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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
As he ends his first year on the job, Baltimore police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts is facing questions about whether he is taking too long to remake the agency and develop a crime-fighting strategy. But others say he is being candid about the city's problems and deserves more time to make progress. Batts, 53, said in a wide-ranging interview that he has been making improvements to the agency of nearly 3,000 officers, though not as quickly as he would like. He plans to keep a relentless focus on gangs and address issues of attrition and low pay for officers.
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NEWS
September 29, 1992
ELLICOTT CITY -- Members of the Howard County Police Department are ready to swing like Jack Nicklaus to help their fellow officers.On Oct. 13, the Howard County Police Association will hold its first Howard County Public Safety Golf Tournament at the Turf Valley Country Club here.Proceeds will go to the group's death benefit fund to assist families of officers killed in the line of duty. Officers hope the event will become an annual fund-raiser.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
City officials yesterday approved a $129,000 consultant's contract to make a position-by-position review of the Police Department -- despite a police union protest that the money would be better spent putting more officers on the street.Police officials told the Board of Estimates that the review by Management Partners of Cincinnati would help determine whether more of the city's 3,100 sworn officers could be shifted from support roles to battle violent crime."Can we get more officers on the street?
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1998
The Baltimore County Police Department invited educators and activists to an informal gathering at a Towson restaurant yesterday. The goal was to help make law enforcement careers more attractive to minorities.Black officers make up 11 percent of the 1,635-member department, which serves a county that is about 15 percent black. Hispanic officers make up about 1 percent of the force and Asians account for less than 1 percent.The department needs more minorities and women, but recruiting them is a national problem, said Services Bureau commander Col. M. Kim Ward.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 30, 1999
The Baltimore Police Department will present two Halloween haunted houses this weekend -- one at the Northern District station in Hampden and the other at the Northwestern District.The Northern District event will take place from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. today and from 4: 30 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. tomorrow at the historic police station at 3355 Keswick Road.The free show features creepy creatures, trick-or-treating and a short anti-drug skit by Maryland Institute, College of Art students.The Northwestern District, in conjunction with the Northwestern District Community Relations Council, will present its haunted house in the garage of the district station at 5271 Reisterstown Road from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. today.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
Howard County's Police Department has not met the county's goal of 15 percent minority hiring, but a new recruitment class next spring should improve the diversity on the force, Chief James N. Robey says.The hiring goal was outlined by the county's Office of Personnel in an affirmative action plan that showed that blacks are Howard's largest minority group, about 12 percent or 22,000 of the county's approximately 187,000 residents, according to the 1990 Census.Although women and minorities each make up about 13 percent of the department's 301 sworn officers, Chief Robey says the department recently took a more aggressive approach to boost diversity, particularly among blacks.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 21, 1997
BALTIMORE City Police Department Col. Margaret Patten sat in one of her office chairs, right beside the pest of a columnist who offered his theory on why some police officers might abuse their spouses or girlfriends."
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
The county police department is nearly $47,000 richer after receiving a check from the Justice Department for helping the Drug Enforcement Administration in four different cases, authorities said Friday.The check for $46,744 represents 18 percent of the cash and property seized by federal agents in the cases, said Officer Randy Bell, a spokesman for the department. The money will be used to help pay for department programs.The largest forfeiture was $149,000 seized in the case of Steven Downey, a Linthicum drug kingpin arrested in October 1993.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
Leon N. Tomlin, a retired city police commander who successfully fought 1970s drug traffickers and later led security for Pope John Paul II's Oct. 8, 1995 visit, died Wednesday of a heart attack at Garrett County Memorial Hospital in Oakland. The Deep Creek Lake resident, who lived for many years in Northeast Baltimore's Hamilton, was 63. Among the highlights of his 38 years in the city Police Department -- he rose through the ranks to be a deputy commissioner, the department's second-in-command -- was his role in the 1992 capture of killer Dontay Carter, whose car and hostage Mr. Tomlin spotted.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | March 21, 1993
Officials in the Howard County Police Department will dust off old stripes for some aspiring supervisors next month.About 30 officers will be promoted to corporal, a rank the department abandoned more than a decade ago. The promotions will be made by mid-April, and the officers named to corporal will receive a 5 percent pay increase, said Chief James N. Robey.The promotions will provide career advancement for aspiring supervisors, who will be called on to fill the gap when sergeants are sick, on vacation or in training, the chief said.
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