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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 16, 2008
Col. William L. Rawlings, a highly decorated career police officer who rose from a beat cop to head the Baltimore Police Department's Internal Investigation Division, died Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The 78-year-old Mays Chapel resident died of a head injury he suffered before his admission to the center. Colonel Rawlings was born in Baltimore and raised in South Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Following The Sun's excellent report on the use of undue force by the Baltimore Police ( "Baltimore leaders call for change following investigation into alleged police brutality," Sept. 28), Baltimore immediately launched the typical five point program. Phase One: We need a technological solution. Let's put cameras on all the cops! Phase Two: We need tougher laws and accountability. It's the mayors fault!! It's the City Councils fault!! Let's increase the penalties for bad cops!
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EXPLORE
May 9, 2012
The Aberdeen Room always enjoys getting assistance with extensive record keeping by donors who have been very active in civic affairs in the Aberdeen area. At times we receive help from those who have worked for city government and are very knowledgeable about their work. We were very fortunate to have a visit by retired First Sgt. James Testerman from the Aberdeen Police Department. He brought with him, as a donation, a binder containing pictures and information about the Aberdeen Police Department, from which he had retired after 39 years and 28 days.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating allegations of brutality and misconduct at Baltimore's Police Department, the type of probe that has triggered wide-ranging reforms in other cities. Here's a look at federal investigations in five other jurisdictions: • Pittsburgh — Police officers were accused of making false arrests of people who challenged their authority and of using excessive force against criminal suspects, including individuals wearing handcuffs. The department was also accused of failing to discipline officers for such actions.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Four former and current African-American Annapolis police officers have filed a federal racial-discrimination lawsuit against the city, claiming that they were unfairly treated, subjected to harassment, wrongly turned down for promotions and, for two of them, given walking papers. "African-American officers in the Annapolis police department are subjected to unequal treatment," claims the lawsuit, which was filed this month in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. It also claims that the black officers were singled out for harsher discipline than white colleagues.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | July 10, 2013
When The Baltimore Sun requested three days of emails sent to or by a trio of officers who help run Baltimore's troubled speed camera program, the Police Department made clear the messages would be released only at a cost. As in about $2,000, possibly more. Yet the city Department of Transportation didn't charge The Sun anything for 6,400 pages of emails that were sent to or by several of its employees. Same city government, same legal department, same state public records law - but notably different outcomes that point to inconsistency when it come to applying the Maryland Public Information Act. The Sun asked both the police and transportation departments for emails that were written in mid-April, when the city abruptly suspended its red light and speed camera program amid fresh signs that some motorists had been wrongly ticketed.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | April 23, 2008
The Baltimore Police Department has made wholesale changes to the leadership of the unit that patrols the city's Inner Harbor in the wake of a highly publicized incident in which an officer berated a young skateboarder, put the boy in a headlock and then threw him to the ground. A new lieutenant and a new sergeant took command of the 12 officers charged with patrolling the area from Fells Point to Harbor East. Lt.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
"You don't look so good," says the cop, smiling. "You look like death."Possum nods, the gaunt face bobbing. The Virus hangs on him, hangs on everything in the rented room. Three decades of firing heroin and thieving and turning over criminals to police at $50 to $100 a head, but it isn't a penitentiary or a bullet or a lethal dose that claims him."Yeah, I been sick, you know," says Possum in a mumble, his stick-leg stretched over a table. "I been sick but I'm back now."Possum, showing some life, talking about working.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
Baltimore's police commissioner struck a defiant tone during a radio appearance Tuesday evening and defended his department amid a series of high-profile cases that have cast a pall on the integrity of the 3,100-member force. Answering questions on the "Marc Steiner Show," Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III for the first time in recent weeks confronted some of his agency's recent scandals and tried to answer critics. He discussed several topics that he has refused to comment on in the past week.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman is asking law enforcement professionals from other jurisdictions to examine the county's troubled police department. Since she took over in February from disgraced former executive John R. Leopold, Neuman said Friday, her office has received a steady stream of anonymous notes alleging problems in the agency. Leopold was convicted of criminal misconduct in office for directing his police protection detail to perform political and personal tasks.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake won praise from clergy and community leaders Friday after calling for a federal investigation into allegations of police brutality - a move that is all but certain to draw added scrutiny on City Hall. But careful observers noted the request from Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts came hours after another official - City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young - raised his hand to invite the U.S. Department of Justice in for a closer look.
NEWS
By James B. Astrachan | October 2, 2014
Violations of civil rights by the Baltimore City Police Department are at best a callous disregard for the rights of citizens; at worst, they are criminal. They are also horrendously expensive for the city's taxpayers. More than $20 million has been paid out in the past decade, according to reports in The Sun and Daily Record, to resolve claims that officers used excessive force or engaged in otherwise improper conduct, such as denial of due process, unreasonable searches and seizures and other violations of civil rights.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Baltimore County police have charged a civilian employee who worked in the department's Criminal Investigation Division after detectives found marijuana in her home Wednesday. Investigators searched the home of Susan M. Burke on Glenback Avenue in Pikesville Wednesday morning, where they found marijuana and drug paraphernalia in the house, police wrote in charging documents. Among the items found were grinders, scales, smoking pipes and a mason jar with plant residue, among other items for marijuana use. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said Burke will be reassigned to another county government position.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
The suspension of a Baltimore City police officer this week after a videotape surfaced showing him violently assaulting a citizen in June appears to confirm what has become a depressing pattern: A brutal attack that should have merited a swift response from authorities was instead met with a passive indifference - inaction that could easily be interpreted as an attempt to cover up the brutality of the crime. Sound familiar? It should, given the furor over the publication recently of a video showing the Ravens' Ray Rice knocking his then-fiancée, Janay Palmer, unconscious in at Atlantic City casino hotel elevator in February.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake criticized the Police Department's handling of a high-profile police brutality investigation on Wednesday, and said she had directed the police commissioner to develop a "comprehensive" plan to address brutality in the agency. Speaking to reporters at City Hall, the mayor said top commanders should have quickly seen a video of an officer repeatedly punching a man, and should have moved immediately to take the officer off the street. "It is outrageous," Rawlings-Blake said of the conduct of the officer shown in the video, whom authorities have identified as Officer Vincent E. Cosom.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | September 11, 2014
When it comes to policing, in some places less is better than more. Fewer police departments can result in better protection and better service. In places like Ferguson, Mo., hostility toward the police would be far less likely if the parent St. Louis County had fewer police departments - or even better, only one. County governments have evolved over time by a variety of ways, with a tendency toward more centralization. The particular form local government takes matters a great deal.
NEWS
February 6, 1994
Years of poor management, confused priorities and chaotic staffing policies have reduced Baltimore City's once-vaunted 2,900-strong police force to a seat-of-the-pants operation.Its robbery and rape units have been decimated. To cope with the crisis of the day -- be it homicides or bank robberies -- the department has given up much of the specialized investigative work that is the backbone of comprehensive crime-fighting.Over the years, chummy cronyism has replaced clear-headed goal-setting at the top. The department is preoccupied with numbers games that make officials look good.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Howard County police say their speed camera vendor has corrected a year's worth of inaccurate data the company submitted about the cameras there.  In a letter submitted to the County Council this week, Chief Gary Gardner reported that Xerox State & Local Solutions had resolved its data issues to the police department's satisfaction. "Xerox has resubmitted the report to the police department after manually checking the data points and it now includes all of the original, complete information," Gardner wrote.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Almost exactly two years ago this week Anthony Batts arrived in Baltimore to take over the leadership of the city's police department. Since then Baltimore has seen homicides go up, then come down again as Mr. Batts has instituted reforms, shaken up the force and reached out to local residents in an effort to build trust between his officers and the citizens they serve. It wasn't always obvious that the department was making progress on his watch, but it's a measure of his success in all those endeavors that today he enjoys the confidence of public officials who just a year ago were openly questioning whether he was up to the job. That remarkable turnaround in attitudes was reflected in the ringing endorsements Mr. Batts received this week from City Council members who appear set to unanimously approve his nomination for a new six-year contract as the city's top cop. Over the past two years Mr. Batts clearly has proven himself as a leader who can get things done, and he has vindicated the high hopes Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake held out for him when she recruited him from the West Coast where he had spent most of his 30-year career in law enforcement.
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