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Police Corruption

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 1995
After assurances by Mayor Edward Rendell of Philadelphia that the city would consider new ideas to fight corruption in the Police Department, two civil rights organizations and 10 other plaintiffs have agreed to delay filing a federal lawsuit seeking reforms to combat police corruption and abuse.Stefan Presser, the legal director for the Philadelphia chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the lawsuit was to have been filed yesterday.But after meeting on Tuesday with the mayor, Police Commissioner Richard Neal and city legal advisers, the plaintiffs said they were willing to wait while city officials considered recommendations for change in the Police Department.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
An alarming rise in summer violence continued Thursday, as the past week's death toll rose to 12 in Baltimore and politicians began sniping over blame. City police announced arrests — including men charged in previous violence — even as detectives found themselves with new killings to investigate. Two men were fatally shot and one wounded early Thursday in West Baltimore, and three women were taken to hospitals after a shooting in Northeast Baltimore Thursday night. In all, 35 people have been shot since last Friday.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
The indicted police officers sit in federal court every day but have never spoken to the men and women who will decide their fates. For two weeks, detectives William A. King and Antonio L. Murray have watched silently as jurors absorbed hour upon hour of the officers' conversations that were secretly recorded by the FBI. Federal prosecutors say wiretaps show how King and Murray masterminded an illegal drug-dealing operation, nicknamed "grinding," that...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Two brothers whose Rosedale auto body shop became the focus of a federal investigation into widespread corruption in the Baltimore Police Department were sentenced to prison Wednesday. Hernan Alexis Moreno, 32, of Rosedale and Edwin Javier Mejia, 29, of Middle River received prison terms of 33 months and two years, respectively, for paying officers to bring them business. The kickbacks scheme was uncovered last year. Their sentences conclude a federal case that sullied the reputation of the Police Department, implicating roughly 60 officers and resulting in 15 being sentenced in federal court to prison terms between eight and 42 months.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- Officer Erika Alcaraz walks up to cabbie Reynaldo Lazcano just as he is taking on a passenger on Avenida Tasquena.On this 15-yard stretch of this major thoroughfare, no fewer than four signs prohibit the taking on and unloading of passengers. Yet somehow Lazcano finds it in himself to argue strenuously that he didn't know this was an infraction.So, as Alcaraz writes up the ticket, an enraged Lazcano writes down Alcaraz's name and badge number, promising to report her behavior to her superiors.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Peter Hermann and Caitlin Francke and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
Trying to defuse an ugly fight between them, Baltimore police and prosecutors have tentatively agreed to the establishment of a special unit to handle police corruption cases, city officials said yesterday. Key to the agreement is the removal of prosecutor Elizabeth A. Ritter from her role as chief of the division in the state's attorney's office that handles police misconduct cases, police and City Hall sources said. The city has agreed to give State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy funds for the new unit as long as a different prosecutor takes over the cases, according to three sources.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Two brothers whose Rosedale auto body shop became the focus of a federal investigation into widespread corruption in the Baltimore Police Department were sentenced to prison Wednesday. Hernan Alexis Moreno, 32, of Rosedale and Edwin Javier Mejia, 29, of Middle River received prison terms of 33 months and two years, respectively, for paying officers to bring them business. The kickbacks scheme was uncovered last year. Their sentences conclude a federal case that sullied the reputation of the Police Department, implicating roughly 60 officers and resulting in 15 being sentenced in federal court to prison terms between eight and 42 months.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
Baltimore police have substantially reduced a backlog of internal affairs investigations and are changing the focus of police corruption probes, officials said last week. The department is also planning to add detectives to the unit that conducts integrity tests and is refining how those checks are conducted to more carefully target possible police corruption. "We were going fishing," Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark said of the past internal investigations. "We're not fishing. ... My approach is totally different."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
In an effort to crack down on possible police corruption and other serious problems, Baltimore's acting police commissioner is clearing a backlog of minor disciplinary cases that he said has tied up internal investigators for years. Edward T. Norris began yesterday to send out nonpunitive counseling letters to more than 230 officers, warning them that their alleged misconduct is unacceptable but will not result in a permanent mark in their file. It is the first step in streamlining an Internal Affairs Division that commanders say is overburdened by trivial infractions dating back as long as three years -- such as officers who wear the wrong color socks with their uniform.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
A chief prosecutor has been named for the new police corruption unit in the city state's attorney's office, closing another chapter in a bitter feud between city law enforcement agencies and the mayor. The appointment of A. Thomas Krehely Jr., a former prosecutor with the state agency that investigates public officials, comes after Mayor Martin O'Malley and Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris sharply criticized State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy and her office's handling of police misconduct cases this past winter.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
Whoever Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake had chosen to replace retired Baltimore City Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III would have had a tough act to follow. But in Anthony Batts, who comes to Baltimore after a 30-year career in California that included stints as police chief in Long Beach and Oakland, the mayor may have found a leader whose skills and experience match Baltimore's needs. If Mr. Batts can build on the solid accomplishments of his able predecessor, he will find a warm welcome in this city.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | June 18, 2012
Cynthia Gross' first interaction with Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III came at a community meeting about seven months ago, when she stood up to complain about officers being overly aggressive. In a room full of stone-faced officers, you could hear a pin drop, she recalled. That night, Bealefeld offered to walk through her East Baltimore neighborhood with her to talk through her concerns. "I was complaining," she said of that meeting. "I wasn't a fan. But he's a man of his word, and we were able to work with him. " During his five-year tenure leading the city force, Bealefeld emphasized community relations, attending sometimes three neighborhood walks per week and trying to repair the Police Department's image.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, Julie Scharper and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III announced his resignation Thursday, ending a 31-year career on the force that included overseeing a steep decline in the murder rate — but left him exhausted by the pressures of the job. His departure — scheduled for Aug. 1 — stunned some city officials and triggered a nationwide search for a new leader to run the nation's eighth-largest police department. "While I am saddened to announce his retirement, I respect his decision to retire after decades of service to spend more time with his family," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
A Baltimore police officer has been charged with attempted theft of groceries at a Northeast Baltimore store after a cashier — the officer's daughter — rang up items for her at reduced prices, police said Saturday. "We demand, we expect more from the people who wear this badge," Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. The officer is facing both an internal investigation and a criminal summons. The charge comes within days of the department's suspending John A. Ward, 32, a four-year veteran of the force.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
A Baltimore police officer has been suspended for his "conduct" in the aftermath of the shooting of a 13-year-old girl, and after the weapon police suspect was used in the crime was found in his personal vehicle, according to law enforcement sources. Police investigators believe the off-duty officer, whose name was not released, was in a relationship with a relative of one of the juvenile suspects charged Monday with involuntary manslaughter, sources said. Investigators are trying to determine whether he advised the juveniles after the shooting occurred.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 28, 2007
YEKATERINBURG, Russia -- Kirill Formanchuk, like almost everyone who drives in Russia, was used to being pulled over by the police and cited for seemingly trumped-up infractions. Yet instead of resigning himself to paying a bribe, he turned traffic stops into roadside tribunals, interrogating officers about their grasp of the law, recording the events and filing formal complaints about them. There are 28 million cars now, three to four times more than at the end of communism in 1991, experts estimate.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF Staff writer Walter F. Roche Jr. contributed to this article | December 18, 1998
The FBI is investigating whether a high-ranking Baltimore police officer helped protect a gambling ring connected to a city tavern that took in $300,000 a year in bets on lottery numbers and horse racing.Six people have been indicted by federal authorities, who describe a sophisticated bookmaking operation that involved clerks who kept meticulous records and secretly tape-recorded telephone conversations of customers making wagers.A now-retired city police colonel was questioned a year ago by the FBI, but reportedly is not a target.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
A Baltimore police officer has been suspended for his "conduct" in the aftermath of the shooting of a 13-year-old girl, and after the weapon police suspect was used in the crime was found in his personal vehicle, according to law enforcement sources. Police investigators believe the off-duty officer, whose name was not released, was in a relationship with a relative of one of the juvenile suspects charged Monday with involuntary manslaughter, sources said. Investigators are trying to determine whether he advised the juveniles after the shooting occurred.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2006
Police and prosecutors could have put Stephon Wallace in prison for years, after they say he was caught with 18 baggies of crack cocaine last year. But the Baltimore state's attorney's office dropped the charges when the arresting officers got into trouble themselves - indicted in a corruption case that crippled a squad in the Southwestern District. So instead of prison, Wallace - who was already on "double probation" for separate handgun and drug violations - was handed his freedom. Months later, police said, Wallace, a suspected member of a Bloods gang, fatally shot Sheldon Lee Anderson Jr. in the face on Edmondson Avenue.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
The indicted police officers sit in federal court every day but have never spoken to the men and women who will decide their fates. For two weeks, detectives William A. King and Antonio L. Murray have watched silently as jurors absorbed hour upon hour of the officers' conversations that were secretly recorded by the FBI. Federal prosecutors say wiretaps show how King and Murray masterminded an illegal drug-dealing operation, nicknamed "grinding," that...
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