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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III outlined the city's Independence Day security plan Monday evening, in the wake of an early morning shooting downtown near the Inner Harbor, where thousands are expected to gather tonight for the fireworks. "Several hundred uniformed and plainclothes police officers" from the city, as well as the Maryland State Police, the Maryland Transit Administration and the Maryland Transportation Authority were deployed to "ensure that we have a secure and safe July 4 t h celebration," Bealefeld said.
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NEWS
October 8, 2014
The recent coverage of police brutality in Baltimore has been unnerving ( "Civil wrongs," Oct. 5). However, the recent column by Dan Rodricks reflects exactly how disgusted I've been with every other area of city governance. Mr. Rodricks points out how the police commissioner and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake turn a blind eye to paying fines and never delving into the problem ( "Mayor should have seen troubling brutality trend," Oct. 5). But to raise taxes to cover the consequences while raising their salaries and enjoying all the "perks" of office is not fixing the problem.
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NEWS
December 3, 2009
A former Baltimore police commissioner has lost another round in his five-year legal battle challenging his firing. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, in Richmond, Va., upheld Wednesday a lower court's dismissal of Kevin Clark's federal lawsuit. Clark also has unsuccessfully sought reinstatement in Maryland's state courts. Clark and two high-ranking deputies were fired in 2004 by then-Mayor Martin O'Malley. The officers alleged in their federal lawsuit that the mayor and other officials had violated their constitutional rights by having police seize their badges and other equipment and escort them from the building.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts was confirmed Monday by the City Council for a full six-year term. Batts has led the city's police force since October 2012, when he was selected to fill the unexpired term of the previous commissioner, Frederick H. Bealefeld III. His appointment was confirmed unanimously on a voice vote without discussion. He will receive a salary of $201,700, reflecting an $8,000 raise. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said Batts has made "some improvements" and that he was especially pleased with the commissioner's efforts to put more police in neighborhoods.
NEWS
June 13, 2012
Once again our elected leaders in Baltimore have shown that you don't have to be the brightest bulb in the room to have enough common sense to appoint a search committee to find a new city police chief. Two or three of the panel members now lead their own police forces, so they know what best practices are and what it takes to lead the fight against crime. Joe Heming
NEWS
Baltimore Sun reporter | May 3, 2012
This official biography of Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III was provided by the Baltimore Police Department. Frederick H. Bealefeld, III was appointed Police Commissioner of the City of Baltimore, Maryland on November 20th, 2007 and commands the eighth largest police agency in the United States. With over three decades of service to the Baltimore Police Department, Commissioner Bealefeld is credited with reducing city homicides and violent crime to the lowest levels since the 1970's.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Anthony W. Batts was officially sworn in Thursday as Baltimore's 37th police commissioner, pledging to build trust with the community while continuing to reduce violent crime. Batts, who spent three decades with departments in California, has been guiding the city police force since his arrival in late September following the retirement of agency veteran Frederick H. Bealefeld III. The city's homicide numbers are on track to rise compared to last year, when Baltimore saw fewer than 200 killings for the first time since the 1970s, but overall gun violence continues to trend downward.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2010
Baltimore's top prosecutor accused the city's police commissioner Friday of using the power of his badge to help her opponent in next month's primary State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said in a statement that Frederick H. Bealefeld III has broken years of precedent with "overt actions … to influence the outcome of an election" — which she warned "can only lead to divisiveness and distrust in the community. " Jessamy said it was "unprecedented and inappropriate" for the city's top police officer to put a campaign sign on his lawn.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
However Baltimore's plain-spoken police commissioner is remembered, when he departs on the first day of August, he will leave his successor a challenging target. The number 200. That is the standard by whichFrederick H. Bealefeld III's successor will be measured. Under his watch, Baltimore recorded 196 homicides in 2011, breaking a symbolic barrier that eluded nine previous chiefs, all the way back to 1977. Fairly or unfairly, the mayor and commissioner - along with the city as a whole - have been judged and have judged themselves on the annual body count.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
As communities across Baltimore gathered Saturday for events designed to address the violence troubling the city, mayhem occurred once more. In a chaotic chain of events, the city's police commissioner came across a shooting in a Northeast neighborhood, prompting a police response that led to an accident and left several people injured. About 50 people turned out in midafternoon for a three-mile walk of the Sinclair Lane neighborhood to celebrate the beginning of the school year and to provide positive role models in the hope that children will steer away from violence.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Almost exactly two years ago this week Anthony Batts arrived in Baltimore to take over the leadership of the city's police department. Since then Baltimore has seen homicides go up, then come down again as Mr. Batts has instituted reforms, shaken up the force and reached out to local residents in an effort to build trust between his officers and the citizens they serve. It wasn't always obvious that the department was making progress on his watch, but it's a measure of his success in all those endeavors that today he enjoys the confidence of public officials who just a year ago were openly questioning whether he was up to the job. That remarkable turnaround in attitudes was reflected in the ringing endorsements Mr. Batts received this week from City Council members who appear set to unanimously approve his nomination for a new six-year contract as the city's top cop. Over the past two years Mr. Batts clearly has proven himself as a leader who can get things done, and he has vindicated the high hopes Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake held out for him when she recruited him from the West Coast where he had spent most of his 30-year career in law enforcement.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
As communities across Baltimore gathered Saturday for events designed to address the violence troubling the city, mayhem occurred once more. In a chaotic chain of events, the city's police commissioner came across a shooting in a Northeast neighborhood, prompting a police response that led to an accident and left several people injured. About 50 people turned out in midafternoon for a three-mile walk of the Sinclair Lane neighborhood to celebrate the beginning of the school year and to provide positive role models in the hope that children will steer away from violence.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts set an example for his fellow officers when he met recently with Baltimore's transgender community to discuss the murder of a 26-year-old transgender woman whose body was found in a Northwest Baltimore alley last week. The death of Mia Henderson on Wednesday, and the slaying last month of Kandy Hall, another transgender woman, sent shock waves through the LGBT community that have left many members fearful of being targeted by violence, yet reluctant to turn to police for help.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
During a June meeting of leaders from Baltimore's law enforcement and judicial circles, city police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts gave a report on crime that included a surprising statistic. Half of all cars stolen in Baltimore had their keys left in the ignition, he said. The comments were made as he informed officials that car thefts had increased 4 percent compared with the same period last year. This month, he repeated the same "50 percent" estimate to the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, which includes local judges, prison officials, federal and state prosecutors.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
When Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts appeared at a recent town hall, a woman stood to ask about police brutality, a touchy topic for both residents and officers. She said she worried for her young nephew, who was frequently stopped by police. Batts' 10-minute answer ranged from the personal to the practical. He talked about his upbringing in South Central Los Angeles, drawing laughs about the fried bologna sandwiches his family ate to survive. He explained why people must sit cross-legged on curbs for officer safety, but understood police interactions can be demeaning for those detained.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
I had to laugh as I read in The Sun about the "stroll" by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake ( "Rawlings-Blake, Batts stroll to show safe harbor," June 4). If this was a walk to promote "safety" downtown, why was it necessary to be surrounded by a phalanx of police officers and the city's police commissioner? I think the irony here speaks for itself. However, I salute her prudence. F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
A group of children play ball in the courtyard after dark as Anthony W. Batts walks through a high-crime West Baltimore public housing project wrapped around the Edgar Allan Poe House. It's quiet here, with an officer permanently stationed on-site, but the new police commissioner's department is dealing with problems across the city - two people will be killed in shootings by the end of the night. As Batts travels through Baltimore to learn on the job about his new town, he'll also get a close look at the uneven relationship between police and the community.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
The mayor's "safety walk" would have been more impressive if she had taken it after sundown - and if she hadn't been accompanied by at least seven uniformed members of Baltimore's Finest, including the police commissioner ( "Rawlings-Blake, Batts stroll to show safe harbor," June 4). Ron Zaczek, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
As his security detail struggled with an armed man this month, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts held a gun to the suspect's head and punched him in the face before gaining control of the man's weapon, court documents show. Batts and his three-member security detail arrested Alante Moultrie, 20, on May 16 in the 2300 block of E. Monument St., shortly after they left the scene of a police-involved shooting. Moultrie is being held without bond on drug and gun charges. According to charging documents, Batts' driver pulled over for an unspecified reason and members of the detail - dressed in suits - approached six men standing in front of a deli.
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