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NEWS
October 8, 2014
The recent coverage of police brutality in Baltimore has been unnerving ( "Civil wrongs," Oct. 5). However, the recent column by Dan Rodricks reflects exactly how disgusted I've been with every other area of city governance. Mr. Rodricks points out how the police commissioner and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake turn a blind eye to paying fines and never delving into the problem ( "Mayor should have seen troubling brutality trend," Oct. 5). But to raise taxes to cover the consequences while raising their salaries and enjoying all the "perks" of office is not fixing the problem.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Baltimore pastor Jamal H. Bryant was among protesters arrested in Ferguson, Mo., on Monday, as he and other clergy demonstrated against police brutality and misconduct. Bryant was on the front lines of a crowd of hundreds of protesters and faith leaders marching from a church to the Police Department in Ferguson, the town where unarmed teenager Michael Brown was fatally shot by police two months ago. In a tweet posted Monday afternoon, Bryant said he had been released. "Just released from St Louis county!"
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NEWS
August 4, 2010
Well, I finally switched my position on the Second Amendment, and it's all due to a renegade dirt bag cop who can't control himself ("Officer shoots, kills dog in Arundel," Aug. 4). I'm talking about the piece of garbage who killed a defenseless dog because he didn't like the way it played with other dogs. What a worthless, disgusting excuse for a human being. I hope that the recent rulings by the Supreme Court result in every person carrying a handgun wherever they go. If so, that worthless scumbag would have gotten the punishment he deserves -- to die in a hail of gunfire from decent, law-abiding citizens.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
It wasn't long after Ashley Overbey won approval for a $63,000 settlement from Baltimore's government that anonymous critics began their assault against her on the Internet. Commenting on news accounts of the settlement - which ended her lawsuit alleging police brutality - they accused the 27-year-old of initiating her arrest to get a big payout. She responded, defending herself and recounting details of the incident - a move that led the city to withhold $31,500 from Overbey's payout this week.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner outlined Tuesday a sweeping plan to reduce police brutality, including the possibility of equipping officers with body cameras, while reiterating that they are committed to restoring public trust in the agency. "We didn't create these problems, but as leadership in charge today, it's our obligation to do everything that we can to fix the breach between the community and police," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said about the 41-page report outlining their plans.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
It wasn't long after Ashley Overbey won approval for a $63,000 settlement from Baltimore's government that anonymous critics began their assault against her on the Internet. Commenting on news accounts of the settlement - which ended her lawsuit alleging police brutality - they accused the 27-year-old of initiating her arrest to get a big payout. She responded, defending herself and recounting details of the incident - a move that led the city to withhold $31,500 from Overbey's payout this week.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Where are the cameras? We know bad cops exist. We know their actions have cost this city millions in court costs and degraded the police department's public image. Message received (" Call in the feds ," Oct. 6). Our leaders have abandoned the search for a solution that is already on the table: "CopCams. " The mayor and police chief are "reviewing" the idea, but what's to review? Many of us own smartphones with video. A quick trip to the Internet reveals helmet cameras and a full array of other video tools.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Following The Sun's excellent report on the use of undue force by the Baltimore Police ( "Baltimore leaders call for change following investigation into alleged police brutality," Sept. 28), Baltimore immediately launched the typical five point program. Phase One: We need a technological solution. Let's put cameras on all the cops! Phase Two: We need tougher laws and accountability. It's the mayors fault!! It's the City Councils fault!! Let's increase the penalties for bad cops!
NEWS
October 5, 2011
As a nonviolent activist, I read with interest your article "Wall Street protesters to target N.Y. police" (Sept. 30). I have had considerable contact with the police on the front lines of various protests over the years, and while most police officers have treated me with respect, on occasion some brutes have revealed their macho side. Unfortunately, the New York City Police Department has an awful reputation for mistreating protesters. Since almost everyone has a camera these days, one would expect the police to be on their best behavior, but some still get out of control, presumably because they do not fear any punishment from their superiors.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Baltimore lawmakers and community activists called Sunday for more reforms and federal oversight of the city's Police Department after learning about broken bones and battered faces from an investigation into allegations of police brutality in recent years. Responding to results of a six-month Baltimore Sun investigation , two councilmen said they had not known that the city paid money in more than 100 settlements or jury verdicts since 2011. "The administration likes to keep some of that quiet," said Councilman Warren Branch, head of the panel's public safety committee.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
WEATHER Mostly sunny with a high of 68, and a low of 53.   TRAFFIC Get the latest on delays for this morning's commute from baltimoresun.com     FROM LAST NIGHT  Police are searching for a suspect they believe shot his girlfriend's ex-husband with a BB gun at Hereford High School last night.     TODAY'S FRONT PAGE Federal officials announced that they will screen international passengers at five major U.S. airports. A U.S  Department of Justice official promised that his agency's investigation of police brutality in the Baltimore Police Department would be a “candid”  assessment.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Where are the cameras? We know bad cops exist. We know their actions have cost this city millions in court costs and degraded the police department's public image. Message received (" Call in the feds ," Oct. 6). Our leaders have abandoned the search for a solution that is already on the table: "CopCams. " The mayor and police chief are "reviewing" the idea, but what's to review? Many of us own smartphones with video. A quick trip to the Internet reveals helmet cameras and a full array of other video tools.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A U.S. Department of Justice official promised Wednesday that his agency's months-long investigation of police brutality in Baltimore would be a "candid" assessment, and federal lawmakers threw their support behind the probe. Ronald L. Davis, director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, said he met with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts in Arkansas on Wednesday at a U.S. Conference of Mayors event focused on police misconduct.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Complaints of excessive use of force and other misconduct by police are nearly as old as modern police departments themselves; the first known use of the term "police brutality" appeared in The New York Times in 1893, and it's been a problem for law-enforcement officials ever since. If police brutality isn't new, neither was much in the plan to combat it unveiled this week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts. Most of the steps it outlined, such as beefing up the department's internal affairs unit, giving the chief greater power to discipline officers and studying the idea of equipping police with body cameras that record their interactions with the public were little more than hasty rehashes of the strategic plan Mr. Batts commissioned in 2012 when he took over the department.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
The recent coverage of police brutality in Baltimore has been unnerving ( "Civil wrongs," Oct. 5). However, the recent column by Dan Rodricks reflects exactly how disgusted I've been with every other area of city governance. Mr. Rodricks points out how the police commissioner and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake turn a blind eye to paying fines and never delving into the problem ( "Mayor should have seen troubling brutality trend," Oct. 5). But to raise taxes to cover the consequences while raising their salaries and enjoying all the "perks" of office is not fixing the problem.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner outlined Tuesday a sweeping plan to reduce police brutality, including the possibility of equipping officers with body cameras, while reiterating that they are committed to restoring public trust in the agency. "We didn't create these problems, but as leadership in charge today, it's our obligation to do everything that we can to fix the breach between the community and police," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said about the 41-page report outlining their plans.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
State and local politicians continued the call Monday for heightened scrutiny of Baltimore police officers who are the focus of brutality allegations, urging tougher penalties for offenders and greater disclosure of internal discipline. "Police brutality is completely inexcusable. I'm going to apply justice fairly, even to those who wear a badge," said Marilyn Mosby, who is expected to be the next Baltimore state's attorney. The Democrat is the only major party nominee on the ballot, though she faces opposition in the Nov. 4 election from a write-in candidate.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A U.S. Department of Justice official promised Wednesday that his agency's months-long investigation of police brutality in Baltimore would be a "candid" assessment, and federal lawmakers threw their support behind the probe. Ronald L. Davis, director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, said he met with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts in Arkansas on Wednesday at a U.S. Conference of Mayors event focused on police misconduct.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Following The Sun's excellent report on the use of undue force by the Baltimore Police ( "Baltimore leaders call for change following investigation into alleged police brutality," Sept. 28), Baltimore immediately launched the typical five point program. Phase One: We need a technological solution. Let's put cameras on all the cops! Phase Two: We need tougher laws and accountability. It's the mayors fault!! It's the City Councils fault!! Let's increase the penalties for bad cops!
NEWS
October 6, 2014
The decision last week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts to call in federal investigators to probe allegations of excessive use of force and other misconduct by Baltimore police is as embarrassing as it was unavoidable. No city attempting to polish its image as an attractive place to live and work wants to admit having a problem with police brutality it can't handle. But since a six-month investigation by The Sun uncovered evidence of a dysfunctional department seemingly inimical to reform, it's been apparent that the city needs help.
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