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By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - An obscure but powerful arm of Congress is trying to take custody of all government records related to the anthrax attack on Capitol Hill, a move that could make it more difficult to get a public accounting of the cost of cleaning up the Hart Senate Office Building. But officials of the Environmental Protection Agency, which helped direct the cleanup effort, balked this week at surrendering their files. If strictly followed, an order issued by the U.S. Capitol Police Board would require federal agencies such as the EPA to destroy all copies of documents relating to the anthrax incident at the Capitol complex.
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NEWS
July 1, 2014
A year after Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake pledged to reinvigorate the city's civilian police review board, panel members say nothing much has changed. That's hardly surprising. The board still lacks the power to investigate citizens' complaints of police misconduct in a timely fashion, and its recommendations are routinely ignored by the department. A panel so toothless that even its own members publicly wonder whether their efforts are a complete waste of time obviously isn't accomplishing its mission as a mediator of police-community relations.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
Lawyers for Anne Arundel County and a fired police officer clashed before the state's top court yesterday, arguing over what standard an internal discipline board should use to decide whether an officer is a thief. The case stems from the firing of Charles Coleman, a county police corporal, in 1998 after a board determined that he had stolen cash during a test of his integrity. At stake for Coleman are his pension, estimated to top $1 million, which he cannot collect because he was fired just before reaching 20 years on the police force, and his reputation and ability to get a security-related job. The legal issue affects police around the state, said Coleman's lawyer, Byron L. Warnken, because this case could lead to a ruling setting one standard for police boards throughout Maryland.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Six city residents were sworn-in Monday to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's effort to remake a panel described as irrelevant and ineffective. The civilian board, which is tasked with reviewing police misconduct complaints, has sat half-vacant for years, and the panel's recommendations are rarely followed, according to reports in The Sun. The mayor also appointed a new chairwoman to lead her Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 1997
A Howard County police officer who was fired from the force Monday says he plans to take legal action against the county over alleged racist slurs against his Asian fiancee.Officer Paul Smith, 38, was fired after an internal review board last week found him guilty of conduct unbecoming an officer and falsifying a police report in connection with an incident involving the clerk of a Jessup video store in August 1996.But Smith -- a 10-year veteran of the Howard force -- says the real reason he was fired was because he filed a formal complaint against a superior officer in September 1996, accusing him of speaking in broken English while referring to Smith's Taiwanese fiancee, Kuei "Amy" Huei Lin, who was a witness in the video store incident.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2002
A Baltimore police officer who shot and killed an apparently unarmed teen-ager in 1993 was given a letter of reprimand and his police powers were taken away in October, city police officials disclosed yesterday. The shooting led to a six-year saga in criminal courts for Officer Edward T. Gorwell II. It culminated in 1999 when prosecutors dropped manslaughter charges as a result of new evidence. The department was seeking to fire Gorwell, but reached an agreement with him that revoked his police powers but kept him on the Police Department payroll - instead of taking him before an internal police board - for a variety of reasons, said Sean R. Malone, head of the legal affairs unit of the department.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Days after Baltimore officials were booed at a hearing on police practices, the City Council called for expanding the powers of a civilian board charged with scrutinizing the department's use of force. The nonbinding resolution introduced by Council President Sheila Dixon asks the General Assembly to pursue legislation to allow the board to investigate allegations of false arrest and imprisonment - a key point of contention at last week's hearing. "There is still a great deal of mistrust," Dixon said in an interview.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
The highest-ranking state police supervisor ever to be charged with sexual harassment at the agency allegedly exposed himself to a female trooper in his office and forced her hand between his legs while sitting in a squad car.Those and other previously undisclosed allegations by six women are part of a secret report detailing a series of incidents in the case against Maj. Edward E. "Earl" Dennis Jr., a 22-year veteran of the force who was convicted last...
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | January 23, 1991
The naming of a "blue-ribbon" commission to evaluate and possibly reorganize the county police department has briefly been put on hold ascounty officials sort through a surprising rush of applicants.The commission was to be announced Tuesday, but calls from about 25 to 30 citizens interested in serving on the 15-member Citizens' AdvisoryCouncil for Public Safety have forced a delay, said Beverly Wilhide,administrative assistant to County Executive Charles I. Ecker.Officials did not invite applicants, and the calls from citizens were a surprise, said Wilhide.
NEWS
By Shelly Greenberg | March 19, 1999
CITIZEN oversight of local police is essential. However, establishing an independent civilian review board to oversee discipline of Baltimore police officers is not.Independent civilian review boards have merit in some cities where they help restore the public's willingness to file complaints once police officials have demonstrated that they are unable or unwilling to discipline officers.This is not the case in Baltimore. The vast majority of police officers are committed to protecting individual rights, adhering to law and policy and providing a high degree of service.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
In a mostly empty ninth-floor conference room on a recent Thursday evening, the civilian panel charged with investigating police misconduct in Baltimore met for its monthly meeting. There are supposed to be nine members, but four chairs were empty - those positions have been vacant for years. Of the five positions that are filled, four of the members said they want out, having long overstayed the limits of their terms. When the board was created more than a decade ago, boosters promised it would prove a crucial check on brutality and abusive language by police officers.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake called Thursday for the city's fire and police pension board to sue to recover funds lost in the Bernard L. Madoff financial scandal. The pension fund lost about $3.1 million after a hedge fund in which it was invested, Union Bancaire Privee Asset Management, placed money in another fund that invested with Madoff. During a council meeting she called to discuss the matter, Rawlings-Blake pointed to a recent Wall Street Journal article that alleges UBP researchers warned its money managers not to do business with Madoff.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Days after Baltimore officials were booed at a hearing on police practices, the City Council called for expanding the powers of a civilian board charged with scrutinizing the department's use of force. The nonbinding resolution introduced by Council President Sheila Dixon asks the General Assembly to pursue legislation to allow the board to investigate allegations of false arrest and imprisonment - a key point of contention at last week's hearing. "There is still a great deal of mistrust," Dixon said in an interview.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
Saying that children are endangered every time a driver fails to stop for a school bus flashing its red lights, Carroll County school officials highlighted yesterday a partnership with local police departments to target law-breaking motorists. As the first day of school started, school officials emphasized at a news conference yesterday that police on the streets are looking for drivers who don't stop for buses that are picking up or dropping off children. "Police presence was everywhere" throughout the county yesterday, said Jim Doolan, the school system's transportation director.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - An obscure but powerful arm of Congress is trying to take custody of all government records related to the anthrax attack on Capitol Hill, a move that could make it more difficult to get a public accounting of the cost of cleaning up the Hart Senate Office Building. But officials of the Environmental Protection Agency, which helped direct the cleanup effort, balked this week at surrendering their files. If strictly followed, an order issued by the U.S. Capitol Police Board would require federal agencies such as the EPA to destroy all copies of documents relating to the anthrax incident at the Capitol complex.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2002
A Baltimore police officer who shot and killed an apparently unarmed teen-ager in 1993 was given a letter of reprimand and his police powers were taken away in October, city police officials disclosed yesterday. The shooting led to a six-year saga in criminal courts for Officer Edward T. Gorwell II. It culminated in 1999 when prosecutors dropped manslaughter charges as a result of new evidence. The department was seeking to fire Gorwell, but reached an agreement with him that revoked his police powers but kept him on the Police Department payroll - instead of taking him before an internal police board - for a variety of reasons, said Sean R. Malone, head of the legal affairs unit of the department.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
In a mostly empty ninth-floor conference room on a recent Thursday evening, the civilian panel charged with investigating police misconduct in Baltimore met for its monthly meeting. There are supposed to be nine members, but four chairs were empty - those positions have been vacant for years. Of the five positions that are filled, four of the members said they want out, having long overstayed the limits of their terms. When the board was created more than a decade ago, boosters promised it would prove a crucial check on brutality and abusive language by police officers.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | April 30, 1991
A county police officer charged with beating a man during a traffic stop last year was found innocent by a departmental hearing board yesterday, despite testimony from three witnesses who said they saw him hit the man.After more than two hours of deliberation, the board of three county officers found Officer Donald Staten innocent of excessive force, failing to file a report and failing to identify himself.The officer said he was happy with the verdict and added, "Overall, with the new chief, there is a better rapport, and I think the trial boards will be a lot fairer."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
A Baltimore police disciplinary panel found Brian L. Sewell guilty yesterday of misconduct stemming from the arrest of an innocent man on drug charges last year. The board recommended that Sewell be fired. Sewell was found guilty of making false statements in police reports and a statement of charges, misleading police and prosecutors, and misconduct in office. Sean R. Malone, head of the department's legal affairs office, said the case was "an important one for the Baltimore Police Department" and showed that police officials were serious about cracking down on bad officers.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2001
An Anne Arundel County police trial board recommended yesterday firing an officer for neglecting his duty when he did not seek medical attention for a drunken-driving suspect who died in police custody in December. The three-member board found Officer Charles R. Atwell II guilty of seven departmental charges, including failing to perform his duty and conduct unbecoming an officer in connection with the death Dec. 15. Philip A. Montgomery, 20, a Calvert County electrician's apprentice with a history of mental illness, died of antifreeze poisoning in a Southern District holding cell about six hours after Atwell mistakenly arrested him for drunken driving.
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