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NEWS
February 5, 1999
THE PLEA OF Columbia village officials for more patrols by Howard County police is understandable. With nearly 90,000 residents, unincorporated Columbia is a city in every respect except legal designation.But it is a community without a police force that must take law enforcement measures beyond the meager steps of its governing homeowners association.Toward that end, the Columbia Council next Thursday should give Howard County police more authority over the 3,100 acres of open space Columbia owns.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
When a police sergeant approached a black Jeep Cherokee parked on the side of Piney Orchard Parkway in Anne Arundel County, its hazard lights blinking, she thought it would be a routine check on a stranded motorist. But the encounter was the first in a series of events that ended with the motorist's death. Police said that when the sergeant approached, 41-year-old Patrick Raphael Toney, an academic adviser at Bowie State University, got out of the vehicle, threw items onto the ground and spat.
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | June 26, 1991
The city Board of Estimates has approved a police mutual aid agreement with Baltimore County that would give police officers full police powers in both jurisdictions.Action by county officials is necessary before the agreement can take effect. The agreement fully expands limited police authority granted in previous years by the state legislature, which governs the hot pursuit of suspects across jurisdictional lines and drug investigations."To our knowledge this is the first police mutual aid agreement between jurisdictions in Maryland with this kind of full police powers," said city Deputy Police Commissioner Michael C. Zotos, who presented the agreement to the board this morning.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2011
As the three men rifled through his pockets and upended beds in his Southeast Baltimore home, Moises Pacheco says he spotted a small detail that made him begin to suspect the intruders were not the police officers they claimed to be. One of the men had a walkie-talkie, and it looked like a children's toy, said Pacheco, a native of Ecuador who has lived in Baltimore for the past eight years and speaks limited English. After the men found $1,800 in his wallet — money he says he planned to use to purchase a car — they took off running.
NEWS
By Peter Moskos | July 31, 2009
Apparently even Henry Louis Gates Jr. isn't immune to being arrested for "contempt of cop." Discretionary arrests for minor charges happen all the time. It's only rare when it happens to somebody of Professor Gates' stature and becomes national news. If you're a police officer and run into the director of Harvard's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research - even if he is rude to you - best to let it slide. Really. In my book Cop in the Hood, I described how officers can invite a person outside in order to arrest him for disorderly conduct.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Saying dejectedly that they have seen it all before, civil rights groups and activists foresee serious new threats to individual liberties from the rising demand among politicians for a crackdown on militant anti-government forces.As President Clinton widened his public complaint yesterday against those who "spread hate" and official Washington planned to move swiftly on new "counterterrorism" proposals, civil libertarians argued strenuously against going too far.But the fear being expressed from more liberal groups was also matched by some concern in conservative circles.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2011
As the three men rifled through his pockets and upended beds in his Southeast Baltimore home, Moises Pacheco says he spotted a small detail that made him begin to suspect the intruders were not the police officers they claimed to be. One of the men had a walkie-talkie, and it looked like a children's toy, said Pacheco, a native of Ecuador who has lived in Baltimore for the past eight years and speaks limited English. After the men found $1,800 in his wallet — money he says he planned to use to purchase a car — they took off running.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
Concerned about vandalism and safety problems at two neighborhood centers in Columbia's Oakland Mills village, the Columbia Council has given Howard County police the authority to patrol and make arrests on the privately owned properties.The Columbia Council's decision, by a unanimous vote during its meeting last Thursday, is in line with the Columbia Association's larger effort to include all of the new town's wooded areas, pathways and tot lots under Title 19.Title 19 is a Howard County ordinance that gives police the latitude to enforce laws on private property -- such as the new town's open space -- without first having to contact the property owner.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 1995
JERUSALEM -- Israel's foreign minister and the leader of the Palestinians sat down yesterday for what they said was the final drive for an agreement whose every paragraph and period has been the result of grueling struggle.Resuming talks after a 24-hour break for the Jewish Sabbath, Shimon Peres, the Israeli foreign minister, and Yasser Arafat, the Palestine Liberation Organization leader, expressed confidence that they could finish before the two-day Jewish New Year holiday, which begins at sundown today.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, heeding a plea by the state of Maryland, agreed yesterday to spell out the authority of police to order all passengers out of cars they have stopped, to control occupants' movements.At issue is the constitutionality of a police order, after a car is stopped for a traffic violation, that all the passengers get out -- a move that the state contends is required to assure police safety.Maryland's highest court, the Court of Appeals, ruled in August that the Constitution's Fourth Amendment does not allow police to routinely order passengers out of vehicles.
NEWS
By Peter Moskos | July 31, 2009
Apparently even Henry Louis Gates Jr. isn't immune to being arrested for "contempt of cop." Discretionary arrests for minor charges happen all the time. It's only rare when it happens to somebody of Professor Gates' stature and becomes national news. If you're a police officer and run into the director of Harvard's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research - even if he is rude to you - best to let it slide. Really. In my book Cop in the Hood, I described how officers can invite a person outside in order to arrest him for disorderly conduct.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 8, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israeli police with sledgehammers and chain saws broke into a fortified building in the West Bank city of Hebron yesterday and dragged out more than 200 spitting, stone-throwing Jewish settlers who had defied a court order to leave. The showdown in the center of the city sparked debate in Israel over the source of authority for its army. Seven army officers and soldiers were disciplined Monday for refusing, on religious grounds and with rabbinical blessing, to serve as backup for the police operation.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The mortar attack that skimmed a barracks roof late Wednesday gives Capt. Kevin Hanrahan an unwelcome feeling. After a poor night's sleep, Thursday doesn't look much better. Hanrahan wants to introduce a visiting reporter to Lt. Col. Fares Jaber Malek, a Baghdad police station chief. Malek, whose predecessor was slain, has become an Iraqi hero for steeling his new recruits to take on insurgents. But Malek is nowhere to be found, so Hanrahan takes the reporter and heads to another police station.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley wants the Maryland Senate to reject legislation that would restrict the authority of city police to conduct raids of liquor stores and bars, placing him at odds with a city senator with whom he has clashed in the past. O'Malley said yesterday that a bill sponsored by Sen. Joan Carter Conway of Baltimore would hamper the crime-fighting efforts of police, and should be killed. "We've been making some really important strides in reducing violent crimes," O'Malley said in an interview.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2003
MURPHY, N.C. - For five years, the mystery of Eric Rudolph's whereabouts provided a kind of parlor game for residents here along the forested flanks of the Appalachians. But the arrest over the weekend of the man accused of four bombing attacks placed a new question on the lips of just about everyone in this western North Carolina town, locals and visitors alike: How did he do it? As authorities began yesterday to retrace the steps that led to Rudolph's capture behind a supermarket on the edge of town, there was only speculation about how the former handyman managed for years to elude a manhunt by federal agents seeking him in connection with several blasts across the South.
TOPIC
By Geoff Earle and Geoff Earle,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 2002
HAMBURG, Germany -- Since Mohammad Atta and other terrorists hid out undetected in Hamburg for years before the Sept. 11 attacks, Americans have a strong interest in how Germany participates in the "war on terrorism." Germans, like Americans, have been reluctant to give up cherished social liberties in a society that severely restricts state power. In practice, that has led to such severe restriction on authorities that it leads some to question whether Germany will again become a potential haven for terrorist plots.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1996
Hagerstown authorities will resume their search today for a shoplifting suspect who eluded police Friday night by jumping off a highway bridge into the swift-moving, icy Potomac River.Police said the man, who is suspected of stealing $800 worth of tools from a Hagerstown Sears store, last was seen in the river minutes after he jumped, heading toward West Virginia, said Cpl. Greg Spickler of the state police barracks in Hagerstown.The man plunged 50 to 60 feet into the Potomac River from the Interstate 81 bridge near Williamsport, about seven miles from the Hagerstown store, police said.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley wants the Maryland Senate to reject legislation that would restrict the authority of city police to conduct raids of liquor stores and bars, placing him at odds with a city senator with whom he has clashed in the past. O'Malley said yesterday that a bill sponsored by Sen. Joan Carter Conway of Baltimore would hamper the crime-fighting efforts of police, and should be killed. "We've been making some really important strides in reducing violent crimes," O'Malley said in an interview.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Peter Hermann and Caitlin Francke and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1999
Concerned that arrests of hundreds of protesters at Monday's baseball game against Cuba could flood the local jail, Baltimore prosecutors, jail and court officials urged police in a last-minute meeting yesterday not to arrest protesters.Officials want police to issue criminal citations or simply to detain troublemakers at police stations for a short time. Police have told the officials that they expect up to 1,500 protesters and as many as 600 arrests, meeting participants said."I don't want to have 600 people arrested," said Deputy State's Attorney Haven H. Kodeck.
NEWS
February 5, 1999
THE PLEA OF Columbia village officials for more patrols by Howard County police is understandable. With nearly 90,000 residents, unincorporated Columbia is a city in every respect except legal designation.But it is a community without a police force that must take law enforcement measures beyond the meager steps of its governing homeowners association.Toward that end, the Columbia Council next Thursday should give Howard County police more authority over the 3,100 acres of open space Columbia owns.
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