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NEWS
May 7, 2002
Double standard on race saves city solicitor Why is it that City Solicitor Thurman W. Zollicoffer Jr. can refer to our police officers as "white Gestapo" and get support from the mayor ("O'Malley stands behind solicitor in row with police," May 2), when a police officer lost his job simply because he issued a memo requesting that all black men around a particular bus stop be stopped and questioned regarding the rape of a woman? He gets the mayor's complete support? He doesn't even get a slap on the wrist?
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Hundreds of demonstrators streamed into the Inner Harbor on Thursday evening to protest police misconduct and brutality and stand in solidarity with residents of Ferguson, Mo., where the fatal police shooting of an 18-year-old has sparked days of civil unrest. The rally began as dozens of people gathered outside the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, then walked southeast to city police headquarters to decry the deaths of men in the custody of Baltimore police or after police interactions.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Sedation may have played a factor in the death of a 19-year-old hospital patient who was stunned by police during an altercation, a city council member said Friday. The teen died Thursday after falling into a coma after a May 7 altercation with Good Samaritan Hospital security guards and police, in which a city officer used a Taser. Police are investigating the man's death to determine whether police action was responsible. City Councilman Robert Curran, who represents the district where the teen died, said drugs the patient was given may have played a role in his death.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Sedation may have played a factor in the death of a 19-year-old hospital patient who was stunned by police during an altercation, a city council member said Friday. The teen died Thursday after falling into a coma after a May 7 altercation with Good Samaritan Hospital security guards and police, in which a city officer used a Taser. Police are investigating the man's death to determine whether police action was responsible. City Councilman Robert Curran, who represents the district where the teen died, said drugs the patient was given may have played a role in his death.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | October 21, 2001
AUSTIN - On war, and rumors of war. In 1950, the United States got involved in a war and called it a police action. We are now involved a police action we're calling a war. The semantic confusion is having unfortunate effects on everyone. As we bomb Afghanistan, Secretary of State Colin Powell is waging a diplomatic offensive in the region, including plans for a broad-based future government to include "moderate elements of the Taliban" - an arresting concept. This must be as confusing to the Afghans as it is to us. However, it makes perfect sense in the context of a police action with limited aims and a substantial humanitarian commitment.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1996
Baltimore police yesterday moved in on a 65-square block section of West Baltimore besieged by drugs and guns, culminating a series of raids over the past two months aimed at returning streets to citizens.Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier opened a substation at 1910 N. Longwood St., which he said was in the "epicenter" of illegal activity."We strongly believe that you ought to feel safe to walk down the sidewalk and be able to go shopping and do the kinds of things you need to do in your everyday life without being afraid," Mr. Frazier said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
FLORENCE, S.C. - It had been less than a day since Carol Grause ended a multi-state hunt for a man accused of a Baltimore County slaying and his 11-year-old daughter, but she was reluctant to take any credit. The trim, 53-year-old woman, who wore a silver cross embellished with small diamonds around her neck, said she believes God orchestrated Caitlyn Virts' rescue. "I am not the hero; the hero is those who started prayers for that girl," Grause said early Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
WOODLAWN -- The cop barked the orders and the four black teen-agers followed; they got out of the car one by one, put their hands in the air and dropped to their knees on the pavement."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
City and state legislators say they will push for greater regulation of longstanding but little-known laws that allow security guards to be granted law enforcement powers to arrest and search citizens. "If special police make sense, if they're necessary, and if they really do provide enhanced public safety, then at a minimum there needs to be oversight, accountability, training, and qualifications that are set by the state," Sen. Brian Frosh, who chairs the Judicial Proceedings Committee, said Monday.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
When members of Baltimore County's tactical unit burst into a Reisterstown home this summer, they were looking for potentially armed suspects in the attempted murder of a 15-year-old boy. But in the chaos of the raid, Officer Carlos Artson shot and killed the home's owner - who was not a suspect - after he thrust a large sword at the officer, police said. That raid - and its outcome - mirrored a 2005 Baltimore County police action, in which officers equipped with a battering ram and flash grenades stormed into a Dundalk home to search for drugs.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
FLORENCE, S.C. - It had been less than a day since Carol Grause ended a multi-state hunt for a man accused of a Baltimore County slaying and his 11-year-old daughter, but she was reluctant to take any credit. The trim, 53-year-old woman, who wore a silver cross embellished with small diamonds around her neck, said she believes God orchestrated Caitlyn Virts' rescue. "I am not the hero; the hero is those who started prayers for that girl," Grause said early Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
City and state legislators say they will push for greater regulation of longstanding but little-known laws that allow security guards to be granted law enforcement powers to arrest and search citizens. "If special police make sense, if they're necessary, and if they really do provide enhanced public safety, then at a minimum there needs to be oversight, accountability, training, and qualifications that are set by the state," Sen. Brian Frosh, who chairs the Judicial Proceedings Committee, said Monday.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
When members of Baltimore County's tactical unit burst into a Reisterstown home this summer, they were looking for potentially armed suspects in the attempted murder of a 15-year-old boy. But in the chaos of the raid, Officer Carlos Artson shot and killed the home's owner - who was not a suspect - after he thrust a large sword at the officer, police said. That raid - and its outcome - mirrored a 2005 Baltimore County police action, in which officers equipped with a battering ram and flash grenades stormed into a Dundalk home to search for drugs.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | December 13, 2011
Baltimore joined several other cities from Boston to Los Angeles by sending in the police to disband occupiers who have taken over town squares. Like some but unlike many, Baltimore police evicted more than three dozen protesters and homeless people without making a single arrest. Nearly two dozen were sent to homeless shelters, and police in riot gear acted responsibly and with restraint. Protesters left without any trouble. The picture has been radically different across the country.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
"Lovely," Kari Snyder groaned as she rode shotgun with Officer David Bednar on patrol in Southeast Baltimore. A call had just come over the radio for two men selling drugs on a corner that just happened to be at the end of the 29-year-old's street in Highlandtown. Just then, Bednar swung his cruiser across one lane of traffic near Patterson Park and slammed on the brakes. Earlier, at roll call, where Snyder and about 20 other residents met with officers before hitting the streets as part of a citywide ride-along with police, a sergeant had instructed officers to be on the lookout for a man wanted for questioning in an arson.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | April 15, 2008
Frustrated by the amount of information provided in the wake of the apparent accidental shooting of two teenage boys by an undercover officer, residents of the Howard County neighborhood where the incident took place vented their anger at police last night. Some residents of the Pleasant Chase community in Jessup say they believe that the actions of the officers conducting drug surveillance April 7 put people at risk. About 50 residents attended a meeting last night to air their concerns and get information, with several complaining that officers at the shooting scene were rude and would not tell them what was going on. At one point in the meeting, as Howard County police Chief William McMahon described the victims, who are ages 14 and 15, as "young men," one resident shouted "kids."
NEWS
By Martin A. Schwartz | April 19, 2000
SINCE THE END of the Earl Warren Supreme Court in 1969, the court has continuously and substantially watered down Fourth Amendment protections against police action. It has done so principally by sanctioning an ever-increasing array of warrantless searches and by creating exception after exception to the rule requiring that evidence obtained as a result of an unconstitutional search be excluded at trial. The Supreme Court decisional law is riddled with so many exceptions to the warrant requirement that we have reached the point where warrantless searches are the norm.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 20, 1996
Erika Gaines took her 10-month-old daughter with her to the post office the night of Dec. 9, 1993. Then she spent the next 19 hours in jail when a city police officer arrested her after she "rolled her eyes and gave lip motion," according to official reports.The officer, Tiffany Mack, testified in a civil trial last month that she arrested and charged Gaines with disorderly conduct only after Gaines refused to hand over her driver's license and registration. Mack had stopped in the 4200 block of Nicholas Ave. Gaines -- returning to her home in the 4300 block of Nicholas Ave., with her daughter Jasmine crying from hunger -- pulled up behind her, honked her horn and then drove around the officer.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
The Rev. Charles Neal and his wife, Dana Neal, recalled his arrest in May, when he spent 17 hours in Baltimore's Central Booking and Intake Center for driving with a suspended license - a charge he called bogus. Another man spoke of "jump-out Tuesdays," when, he said, Baltimore police officers "jump out the car, two to three of them, and lock you up." The Rev. Jeffrey Mitchell of First Greater Harvest Church said his son was driving members of the church choir home about a year and a half ago and was arrested after he was not allowed to retrieve his license and registration from the trunk of his car - which was towed and sold at auction.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
Howard County police have launched an internal investigation into the conduct of three officers after one of them shot fireworks from the balcony of his apartment, prompting at least one neighbor to report gunfire, a police report says. The incident unfolded about 2:20 a.m. March 11 when the neighbor called 911 to report seven explosions at the apartment building, the location of which was blacked out in the police report. Police with rifles were en route to the apartment and others had begun establishing "a perimeter" around the building when Officer Kevin Layman reported -- first by phone and then by police radio -- that the fireworks had come from the golf course behind his apartment.
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