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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
New research has found that the Mediterranean diet is linked to a healthy heart. The diet is rich in vegetables, fish, olive oil and nuts. Thinking of switching or adopting some of the principals of the diet? Here is a Mediterranean diet recipe from the Mayo Clinic to get you started. Have a healthy recipe you'd like to share? Send it to andrea.walker@baltsun.com. Ingredients 1 small eggplant, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small yellow zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small green zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 6 medium mushrooms, sliced 1 sweet red pepper, seeded, cored and cut into chunks 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 6 cups water 1 1/2 cups coarse polenta (corn grits)
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
New research has found that the Mediterranean diet is linked to a healthy heart. The diet is rich in vegetables, fish, olive oil and nuts. Thinking of switching or adopting some of the principals of the diet? Here is a Mediterranean diet recipe from the Mayo Clinic to get you started. Have a healthy recipe you'd like to share? Send it to andrea.walker@baltsun.com. Ingredients 1 small eggplant, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small yellow zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small green zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 6 medium mushrooms, sliced 1 sweet red pepper, seeded, cored and cut into chunks 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 6 cups water 1 1/2 cups coarse polenta (corn grits)
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 14, 2001
Although I am not a football fan, my grown son is. I suggested that for the Super Bowl he serve his friends a casual supper. This all-in-one entree is robust and satisfying, yet inexpensive and easy to assemble. Pork with Chilies and Lime Over Cumin-Scented Polenta Makes 6 servings PORK: 6 tablespoons oil, plus more if needed 1 1/2 cups chopped onions 1 cup diced ( 1/2 -inch-cubed) carrots 2 tablespoons (about 2 peppers) minced serrano chili peppers (see Note) 3 pounds boneless pork loin, trimmed of all excess fat and cut into 1-inch cubes 1/2 cup flour Kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons minced garlic 1 (28-ounce)
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 26, 2012
It is said that if you want really good Italian food, you should go to a restaurant where the chef is from Casablanca, Morocco. Nah, I made that up. But it could be a truism. The kitchen of Salute Ristorante Italiano, just over the Howard County line, in downtown Laurel, turns out some very, very good Italian fare indeed. The 53-seat storefront eatery at 504 Main St. has a theater as a neighbor, and a little bit beyond is a liquor store. This is important information, because although Salute doesn't have a liquor license, owners Abdellah and Meriem Kass invite you to bring whatever spirits you wish to accompany the dinner he prepares for you and she serves to you. My party of four recently visited Salute for dinner, since the restaurant is only open for the evening meal, except if you're planning a large private party at lunchtime.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 19, 1996
It seemed like an ordinary Maryland Tuesday, when routine ruled and supper would be nothing special.But onto the scene came a bag of polenta and a visitor named Luigi. The polenta, golden cornmeal, arrived via an Italian food store, Trinacria on North Paca Street, near Baltimore's Lexington Market. The visitor, Luigi Ferrucci, came to Baltimore from Florence, Italy, via Bethesda.Luigi is a physician and was in Bethesda for one of his periodic research stints at the National Institute on Aging.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | December 31, 1997
* Item: Elite Foods Polenta* Servings per package: 4* Cost: $3.19* Preparation time: 10 to 15 minutes* Review: If you're ready to broaden your culinary horizons, try polenta -- an Italian side dish made from cornmeal mush. Preparation of this product couldn't be simpler. Refrigerated plastic-sealed tubes allow you to slice the stuff, then bake, grill or fry it in olive oil or butter. Despite the chanterelle, shiitake, porcini and oyster mushrooms in the wild mushroom polenta, I found it lackluster when served plain.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 4, 2001
I love to include polenta wedges or squares as side dishes in planning menus for entertaining. For the past few months, though, I have been experimenting with cooking the softer variety almost completely in advance and quickly finishing it when needed. Soft polenta has a creamy-smooth consistency. I was delighted with the results and began exploring variations, one of which follows. For a fall menu, you could offer boiled artichokes as a first course, follow with the shrimp and polenta, and finish with poached pears and homemade or bakery-purchased cookies.
FEATURES
By Joan Drake and Joan Drake,Los Angeles Times | April 19, 1992
Italian polenta is very similar to American cornmeal mush. In fact, when polenta meal isn't available, stone-ground yellow cornmeal, available in many health food stores, may be substituted.But polenta wasn't always made from corn. Before corn was introduced from the Americas, polenta was made from barley (in Latin, "polenta" meant simply "barley flour"), millet or even ground chestnuts.Traditionally, polenta is cooked in a round-bottomed copper pan, or "paiolo." But you can get good results using a heavy saucepan.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1991
POLENTA IS a trendy dish.Once considered a "poor man's food," polenta now shows up on fine china in the most elegant of restaurants in Baltimore and throughout the country as an appetizer or the centerpiece of a main course. A highly satisfying food made from cornmeal, polenta is preferred over pasta or bread in certain regions of Italy, notably the Veneto and Friuli regions.Depending on the cornmeal used, the texture of polenta can be either coarse or fine. Using a mixture of both can result in a just-right combination.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 5, 1994
Just try telling the radicchio crowd that polenta is nothing more than expensive cornmeal mush. They'd probably pelt you with pink peppercorns.But it's essentially true. The homemade cornmeal mush I made last week tasted almost identical to homemade polenta. The main difference was the amount of elbow grease that went into the making -- 40 minutes of stirring for the polenta, and only 15 for the mush.For you Spam types who have spent the last five years in the heat 'n' eat aisle, polenta is creamy, cooked cornmeal that usually is chilled, cut into shapes and grilled.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 8, 2012
Southworth reflects: I chose this particular dish because I love the smell of slow-cooking meat on a brisk fall day. The slow cooking breaks down the meat to make it melt in your mouth. And I just love blue cheese (Gorgonzola) with beef; the flavors burst in your mouth. The Calvados Sidecar pairs nicely with the meal, especially because of the fall-evoking apple flavor of the brandy. Cab Braised Short Rib Ingredients: Short Rib: •    4 pounds beef short ribs •    1 tablespoon fresh rosemary •    1 tablespoon fresh thyme •    1 tablespoon kosher salt •    1 tablespoon black salt •    ¼ cup vegetable oil •    1 750-milliliter cabernet sauvignon •    1 tablespoon butter •    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour Polenta: •    5 cups chicken stock •    1 ¾ cups polenta •    ¾ cup crumbled Gorgonzola •    ¿ cup heavy cream Gremolata: •    ¼ cup chopped parsley •    3 tablespoons grated lemon zest •    2 cloves garlic, minced •    2 tablespoons chopped rosemary •    2 tablespoons chopped thyme Directions: Mix rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper and sprinkle over ribs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2011
Now this is dining. The polenta appetizer ($14.95) at Trattoria Alberto has a consistency and silkiness rarely associated with cornmeal. But then again, polenta is the pasta of Northern Italy, and this is a Northern Italian restaurant. The pleasure delivered by this dish is lifted even higher by the sauce that accompanies it, a rich, flavorful reduction of cream, sun-dried tomato and mushrooms. Hard though it is to top the polenta, the vegetarian lasagna ($21.95) soars. This is a delicate house-made pasta layered with fresh vegetables that have been cooked just enough to release their flavor.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 11, 2007
Polenta is a culinary chameleon: it may be either sweet or savory, and crisp, soft and creamy, or cake-like. Polenta is also sold fully cooked, as in this recipe, in tubes that are usually about 1 pound. Open the package over the sink -- when you cut open the plastic, liquid will come out. POLENTA WITH MEATY TOMATO SAUCE Makes 4 servings 1 pound tube (precooked) polenta 1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup chopped onion 1/2 green pepper, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon dried basil (or 1 tablespoon chopped fresh)
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS? and ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS?,NEWSDAY | May 17, 2006
Polenta and grits are both made by cooking dried, ground corn with water to achieve a porridge. The difference between them lies in how the corn is processed and ground. Corn is a grain native to the Americas, and it didn't arrive in Europe until Columbus brought it back upon his return to Spain. Europeans came to appreciate field corn, a starchier variety that is ground into cornmeal and used as animal feed. Northern Italians took to it and used the meal in the grain porridge called polenta that had been eaten since Roman times.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 7, 2005
We love polenta, that Northern Italian cornmeal dish that is adaptable to so many uses. But who has time for all that stirring for a quick weeknight dinner? Not us. Instead, we use fast-cooking versions, which aren't bad at all. We tried this recipe using the precooked version sold in a tube and a boxed variety; both worked well. The polenta is cooked with broth to become somewhat soupy, then topped with a simple tomato sauce studded with precooked chicken sausages and wilted greens. It all makes for a soul-satisfying dish on cold nights, but without a lot of fat. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the analysis for the recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2004
There was a full house -- er, full tent -- at the Walters Art Museum Gala recently. That's the tent the museum always sets up in the middle of Mount Vernon Square for the swanky sit-down dinner and dancing. This year, the party's theme was "Merci Beaucoup," and giving a big thank you was exactly what chairs Millicent and Peter Bain and Walters head honcho Gary Vikan were doing as they greeted guests that evening. The French theme was inspired by the Walters' fall exhibition, The Road to Impressionism: Landscapes From Corot to Monet.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS? and ERICA MARCUS WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POLENTA AND GRITS?,NEWSDAY | May 17, 2006
Polenta and grits are both made by cooking dried, ground corn with water to achieve a porridge. The difference between them lies in how the corn is processed and ground. Corn is a grain native to the Americas, and it didn't arrive in Europe until Columbus brought it back upon his return to Spain. Europeans came to appreciate field corn, a starchier variety that is ground into cornmeal and used as animal feed. Northern Italians took to it and used the meal in the grain porridge called polenta that had been eaten since Roman times.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 7, 2005
We love polenta, that Northern Italian cornmeal dish that is adaptable to so many uses. But who has time for all that stirring for a quick weeknight dinner? Not us. Instead, we use fast-cooking versions, which aren't bad at all. We tried this recipe using the precooked version sold in a tube and a boxed variety; both worked well. The polenta is cooked with broth to become somewhat soupy, then topped with a simple tomato sauce studded with precooked chicken sausages and wilted greens. It all makes for a soul-satisfying dish on cold nights, but without a lot of fat. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the analysis for the recipe.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 4, 2001
I love to include polenta wedges or squares as side dishes in planning menus for entertaining. For the past few months, though, I have been experimenting with cooking the softer variety almost completely in advance and quickly finishing it when needed. Soft polenta has a creamy-smooth consistency. I was delighted with the results and began exploring variations, one of which follows. For a fall menu, you could offer boiled artichokes as a first course, follow with the shrimp and polenta, and finish with poached pears and homemade or bakery-purchased cookies.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE INTERNATIONAL | February 25, 2001
When I visit Paris, I love to sample the new and unusual creations of talented French chefs and then try to reproduce them in my own kitchen to share with you. At L'O a la Bouche, a small, unpretentious place on the Left Bank, I ordered a saddle of rabbit stuffed with spinach and served with wedges of polenta studded with prunes, all napped with a light mustard sauce. With each mouthful, I became more seduced by the exquisite pairing of flavors. In the States, I decided to replace the rabbit, which is not readily available, with pork fillets and simplified the preparation by omitting the spinach filling.
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