Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPolaroid
IN THE NEWS

Polaroid

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BRIDGE NEWS | October 17, 2000
NEW YORK - Polaroid Corp., the instant film and camera maker, posted third-quarter earnings yesterday that fell well below Wall Street estimates, blaming soft film sales, slower retail orders and a weaker euro. Net income fell to $18.4 million, or 40 cents a share, compared with $22 million, or 50 cents a share, in the third quarter last year. Analysts surveyed by First Call/Thomson Financial had expected profit of 54 cents a share. Sales fell 1 percent to $458.2 million from $463 million, although revenue increased 2 percent when adjusted for foreign exchange and discontinued businesses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Hartney and Mary Hartney,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
The subtle chirps of digital cameras may now be the norm when it comes to photography, but there are still a devoted few who champion the click-whirr of a Polaroid camera. They savor the unpredictability of development and delight in not just the nostalgia, but in the artistry and creativity of instant film. Although the writing has been on the wall for a while that Polaroid would stop making its instant films and cameras, the death of the iconic film has sparked life, inspiration and creativity.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 11, 2002
In addition to a tough job market and depressed conditions throughout the photo industry, Polaroid Corp.'s thousands of former employees face an unusual challenge as they seek new jobs. Prospective employers must pay a fee and negotiate a complicated voice-prompt phone menu just to verify the employment history of former Polaroid staffers. For two years the company - which filed for bankruptcy protection in October - has outsourced the service to a Massachusetts firm, Employ- ment Verification Service.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 24, 2008
Millions of families once snapped Polaroid photos and enjoyed passing around the newly minted prints on the spot, instead of waiting a week for them to be developed. Now, Polaroid hopes to conjure up those golden analog days of vast sales and instant gratification again - this time with images captured by digital cameras and camera phones. This fall, the company expects to market a hand-sized printer that produces color snapshots in about 30 seconds. Beam a photo from a cell phone to the printer and, with a purr, out comes the full-color print, formed and dry to the touch.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,1987 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 606ll | June 5, 1991
Q. None of my stocks are going anywhere. I had hoped for better. What should I do about my shares of PolaroidA. Positive signs are developing. Hold your shares of Polaroid Corp. (around $25 a share, New York Stock Exchange) because this famous maker of photographic equipment and film has improved its bottom line in this lean earnings period, advised Alexander Henderson,analyst with Prudential Securities." Polaroid cut its work force by a large margin when its instant camera sales dipped and it also ventured into other areas, such as VCR tapes," said Henderson.
NEWS
March 2, 1991
Edwin H. Land, 81, inventor of instant photography and founder of Polaroid Corp., died yesterday after a long illness in Cambridge, Mass.Mr. Land, who founded Polaroid in 1937 and the Rowland Institute for Science Inc. in 1980, introduced the instant camera in 1947.The idea was said to have struck him when he took a picture of his 3-year-old daughter and she asked why she had to wait to see it.During his tenure at Polaroid, the company introduced instant color photography in 1963 and made a major breakthrough in 1972 with the SX-70 system, which produced a vivid picture outside the camera.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1995
Gary T. DiCamillo, who headed Black & Decker Corp.'s worldwide power tool division for the last two years, yesterday was named chairman and chief executive officer of the Polaroid Corp., the company that invented instant photography but whose image has faded with investors in recent years.Mr. DiCamillo, 44, is only the fourth chairman for the 58-year-old Cambridge, Mass.-based company and the first to come from outside its ranks. He will be under intense pressure to improve the company's lackluster performance.
NEWS
By Mary Hartney and Mary Hartney,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
The subtle chirps of digital cameras may now be the norm when it comes to photography, but there are still a devoted few who champion the click-whirr of a Polaroid camera. They savor the unpredictability of development and delight in not just the nostalgia, but in the artistry and creativity of instant film. Although the writing has been on the wall for a while that Polaroid would stop making its instant films and cameras, the death of the iconic film has sparked life, inspiration and creativity.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 1, 2007
The rise of digital photography spelled doom for the old-fashioned instant film cameras from Polaroid Corp. But now a team of Polaroid veterans plans to make digital cameras more like classic Polaroids, with a device that fits in a shirt pocket and prints digital snapshots in seconds, without using ink. "It's going to go places where no printer has gone before," said Wendy Caswell, president and chief executive of Zink Imaging LLC. Zink unveiled its...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 24, 2008
Millions of families once snapped Polaroid photos and enjoyed passing around the newly minted prints on the spot, instead of waiting a week for them to be developed. Now, Polaroid hopes to conjure up those golden analog days of vast sales and instant gratification again - this time with images captured by digital cameras and camera phones. This fall, the company expects to market a hand-sized printer that produces color snapshots in about 30 seconds. Beam a photo from a cell phone to the printer and, with a purr, out comes the full-color print, formed and dry to the touch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | March 15, 2007
New York artist Matthew Kern snaps photos with his Polaroid SX70 camera, then alters the film to create layered collages. An exhibit of his work opens tomorrow at Gallery Imperato. The works range from larger grids to smaller, single-image pieces. Works by Matthew Kern are on display tomorrow through April 28 at Gallery Imperato, 921 E. Fort Ave., Suite 120. The opening reception is 7 p.m.-10 p.m. March 23. Hours are 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays and Sundays and Mondays by appointment.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 1, 2007
The rise of digital photography spelled doom for the old-fashioned instant film cameras from Polaroid Corp. But now a team of Polaroid veterans plans to make digital cameras more like classic Polaroids, with a device that fits in a shirt pocket and prints digital snapshots in seconds, without using ink. "It's going to go places where no printer has gone before," said Wendy Caswell, president and chief executive of Zink Imaging LLC. Zink unveiled its...
FEATURES
February 21, 2006
Feb. 21 1947: Edwin H. Land demonstrated his Polaroid Land camera, which could produce a black-and-white photograph in 60 seconds. 1965: Former Black Muslim leader Malcolm X, 39, was shot to death in New York by assassins. 1972: President Richard M. Nixon began his historic visit to China.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Word about a new hip-hop song with a line about Polaroid pictures began to create a quiet buzz at the camera company's headquarters in Massachusetts last summer. Then the buzz became a roar. The Grammy-winning song by OutKast, "Hey Ya," and its catch phrase "Shake it like a Polaroid picture" begin to shoot up the music charts. Entertainment Weekly described it as one of the hottest lines of the year. Everyone from a 59-year-old presidential candidate to teen-agers not even born during the camera's heyday were singing along.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | May 16, 2002
New Polaroid Mio takes small, instant photo close-ups Decades after the first instant Polaroid print began developing right in front of the photographer and his subjects, people are still fascinated with the technology. Polaroid knows what fun it is to watch pictures develop and came up with the $80 Mio instant camera for more intimate pictures. More intimate in that the pictures are business-card size and ready to be slid into your wallet. The 5-inch-tall Mio uses a 60 mm aspheric lens to create wonderful little portraits with great color accuracy.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 11, 2002
In addition to a tough job market and depressed conditions throughout the photo industry, Polaroid Corp.'s thousands of former employees face an unusual challenge as they seek new jobs. Prospective employers must pay a fee and negotiate a complicated voice-prompt phone menu just to verify the employment history of former Polaroid staffers. For two years the company - which filed for bankruptcy protection in October - has outsourced the service to a Massachusetts firm, Employ- ment Verification Service.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2001
Saddled by debt and overtaken by better technologies, Polaroid Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection yesterday, a depressing milestone for a firm that 30 years ago was regarded as one of the top investments in America. "It's a sad ending to a unique company," said James Hardesty, president of Hardesty Capital Management in Baltimore and a longtime professional investor who remembers when Polaroid was one of the "Nifty Fifty" group of stocks. Polaroid's Chapter 11 filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., listed about $1.81 billion in assets and $948.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1947: First supersonic airplane1947: Bell Labs invents transistor1947: Polaroid camera developed1948: Israel created
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 16, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - Polaroid Corp. received a bankruptcy judge's permission yesterday to draw $40 million from a $50 million bankruptcy credit line to finance operations while it reorganizes its debts. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Peter Walsh scheduled a hearing for Nov. 5 to consider whether to allow the company to borrow the full $50 million. A group of banks led by J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. is providing the line of credit. Faced with declining instant film sales as digital cameras become more popular, the largest instant-photography company sought bankruptcy protection Friday.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2001
Saddled by debt and overtaken by better technologies, Polaroid Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection yesterday, a depressing milestone for a firm that 30 years ago was regarded as one of the top investments in America. "It's a sad ending to a unique company," said James Hardesty, president of Hardesty Capital Management in Baltimore and a longtime professional investor who remembers when Polaroid was one of the "Nifty Fifty" group of stocks. Polaroid's Chapter 11 filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., listed about $1.81 billion in assets and $948.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.