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Polarization

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NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | April 30, 1996
BROADWAY, Va. -- For those of us who feel ourselves to be participants in America's present culture war, it is difficult to understand the conflict other than as a battle between an ''Us'' who are right and a ''Them'' who are wrong. Whether the issue is law and order, the expression of human sexuality, the balance between rights and responsibilities, or any of today's other charged and divisive issues, we see ourselves as embodying wisdom and virtue and our opponents as misguided and possibly even evil.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
To his friends and supporters, Eric T. Costello is just what the City Council needs: a smart, hard-working community president with financial experience that could save taxpayers money. To his critics, however, Costello is just what Baltimore doesn't need: an ambitious, sometimes volatile leader more interested in pleasing the powerful than his neighborhood's residents. Costello, 33, a New York native, has been a magnet for controversy during his relatively short tenure in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | December 7, 2007
BOSTON -- I am drawn to the brand known as Generation Obama. This presidential candidate has repeatedly offered himself as the post-boomer, the one person in the race who can take us past the great divides of the last 40 years. In announcing his candidacy, Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois used the word "generation" 13 times. In The Audacity of Hope, he described boomer politics with something close to disdain, as a psychodrama "rooted in old grudges and revenge plots hatched on a handful of college campuses long ago."
SPORTS
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
Lorde, the 17-year-old singer-songwriter from New Zealand, waited more than halfway through her hourlong set to satisfy the majority of the Preakness InfieldFest crowd on Saturday afternoon. They wanted "Royals," Lorde's Grammy-winning hit single. With the opening line, "I've never seen a diamond in the flesh," the crowd finally perked up. Under a chandelier hanging above the stage, Lorde completed the one-two punch by following "Royals" with "Team," another radio favorite. Sing-alongs commenced as white confetti showered the audience.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun staff | November 12, 2006
For years, political scientist Morris Fiorina has been going against the tide of conventional political wisdom that points to the growing polarization of the nation's electorate. The Stanford faculty member says that voters are not all that polarized, that there is actually a broad consensus on many seemingly divisive issues. He blames the political system for forcing voters to stake out polarized positions. "I'm feeling really good today," Fiorina said after last week's elections. "I think it was the revenge of moderation, the revenge of the middle."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 9, 1997
Americans cheered again last week after the announcement of the verdict in the O.J. Simpson civil trial as the media reflected yet again about the polarization of the races. But are race relations as bad as the media say? Is anything as bad as the media say?Let's rehash a bit of history that, while downright nasty, might well indicate that racial polarization might not be as horrid as we think it is. Most Americans should remember the case of Emmett Till, the black Chicago youth who was all of 14 in 1955 when two Mississippi white men beat him to death for supposedly getting fresh with a white woman.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck | November 30, 1992
Polarization sharpens computer's sightIt's no problem for a toddler or even, heck, a frog. But simple vision -- being able to identify elements in a video image -- is among the most daunting challenges of computing.Taking a clue from nature, Johns Hopkins University computer science professor Lawrence B. Wolff has built a camera that uses polarized light to present a "richer" picture to a computer trying to interpret an image.Computer vision research "has been biased by the fact that people use color and intensity" to see, Dr. Wolff said.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | December 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Well, you can add another outrageous scandal to the long list of humiliations that have marked Marion Barry's tenure as mayor of this city.Police Chief Larry D. Soulsby resigned a week ago, hours before his roommate, police Lt. Jeff Stowe, was charged with embezzling $46,767 from three police department cash funds that he managed, and of trying to extort $10,000 from a married man whom Mr. Stowe had seen leaving a nightclub for homosexuals.Under fireMr. Soulsby had been under fire for months from citizens who accused him of presiding over a force that is incompetent, corrupt and inclined to hide the misdeeds of Mr. Barry, who named Mr. Soulsby as chief 28 months ago.The police department's homicide record is so bad that wags here say this is the city of perfect crimes.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | November 6, 1992
Washington. -- It was supposed to be a social and political no-no. You just couldn't put two Southern white men on a presidential ticket and hope to win.I thought about this as I listened to the victory speeches of Bill Clinton of Arkansas and Al Gore of Tennessee -- especially when Mr. Gore noted that they had erased an old stigma and made geography irrelevant. I was moved when he pledged that the Clinton-Gore administration would make race, gender and religion irrelevant and let diversity become a strength of America.
NEWS
April 8, 1993
MOST of the time, American cultural exports are embraced with enthusiasm in Britain. Not this time.Donald Treshman, the anti-abortion activist who is the national director of Rescue America, landed in London last week and wound up behind bars within 48 hours. Now the British government wants to kick him out. The home secretary has decreed that Mr. Treshman's specialty was one American export that should be turned away at the water's edge.But Mr. Treshman is still in London, along with a few dozen followers from his group -- the same group that staged the Florida demonstration at which Dr. David Gunn was shot dead on March 10. While Mr. Treshman fights deportation, he has managed to inject some old-fashioned American polarization into the staid politics of England.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
If you were hoping that this winter's freezing temperatures had sent the hated stink bugs packing, you are out of luck. Turns out, they have the good sense to come in from the cold. "I would be nice to think that winter killed them," said Stanton Gill of the University of Maryland Extension, where he specializes in integrated pest management. "But I doubt it. They are good at finding places to hunker down. " While one researcher recently found that nearly 98 percent of brown marmorated stink bugs died in the cold outside his lab, other experts expect to find no more than a 50 percent death rate over the winter.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
The first time seemed alarming for Emma Conger, who emerged from the 30-ish-degree water of the Chesapeake Bay with her face flushed, eyes wide, mouth agape, hair soaked, as if she'd been ambushed with a barrel of ice. "Oh my gosh, yeah, I couldn't believe how cold it was, it was freezing," said Conger, 15, of Clarksville, sloshing out of the water at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis with several hundred other hardy souls who took the noon dip...
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
With sunny skies and temperatures expected in the 50s, a scaled-down Polar Bear Plunge was scheduled at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis on Saturday afternoon after the Special Olympics Maryland fundraiser was canceled in January for the first time ever for dangerous weather. Some 7,000 plungers had signed up for the event last month, but it was not clear how many were expected for Saturday, with a trimmed down schedule of events. Organizers had said the event held in partnership with the Maryland State Police was expected to raise about $1.8 million, short of the $2.5 million goal.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
While most of the continental United States shivered amid the "polar vortex" last month, globally, it was the fourth-warmest January on record and warmest since 2007. The average temperature was 1.17 degrees above the 20th century average of 53.6 degrees, according to the National Climatic Data Center's State of the Climate report. The average temperature just over land was 2.11 degrees above average, at 37 degrees. While cold temperatures dominated the eastern U.S., the warmest temperature anomalies occurred in Alaska, Greenland and eastern China and Russia, according to the report.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Enjoy a mild weekend ahead while you can -- temperatures 20 degrees below normal or colder are expected across the eastern United States by late next week. The U.S. Climate Prediction Center in College Park is calling for strong chances, nearly a certainty, that colder-than-normal temperatures will descend on much of the country, from the northern Plains to the Great Lakes to the Mississippi Valley, the mid-Atlantic and New England. It is the result of a strong ridge of high pressure forecast to develop over the western U.S., according to the Weather Underground's Jeff Masters , while cold air spills southward across the rest of the country.
NEWS
By Pat van den Beemt | February 20, 2014
A week before the Polar Bear Plunge at Sandy Point State Park was canceled because of high winds and freezing temperatures, a hardy group of North County folks took their own dip into frigid water. On Jan. 18, some 15 members of Ravens Roost 99 plunged into a pool outside of A-Town Bar and Grille on Brick Store Road in Hampstead, where they meet each month. And like those who were scheduled to jump into the Chesapeake Bay, the Ravens Roost 99 men and women raised money for Special Olympics Maryland.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 4, 1994
Cernobbio, Como, Italy. -- Decisions rarely are made at Group of 7 meetings, and if made they never are carried out. That comment has been made of past economic ''summits.'' It would be regrettable if it proves true of the meeting of chiefs of state that takes place this week in Naples. The international economy now is in a condition that poses social and political risks to the future of the industrial countries.Thus the interest in a mock G-7 meeting carried out last weekend at this Lake Como resort, at the invitation of the U.S. and Italy.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | April 20, 2006
Thank heaven for the massive marches across the country by those favoring illegal immigrants. These marches revealed the ugly truth behind the fog of pious words and clever political spin from the media and from Democrats and Republicans in Washington. "Guest workers"? Did any of the strident speakers, with their in-your-face bombast in Spanish, sound like guests? Did they sound like people who wanted to become Americans? Were they even asking for amnesty? They didn't sound as if they were asking for anything.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
On Saturday, Jan. 25, Special Olympics Maryland, in consultation with the Maryland State Police, the Maryland Park Service and Natural Resources Police, canceled the MSP Polar Bear Plunge due to a combination of extreme conditions at Sandy Point State Park that were unprecedented in the 17-year history of the event. I want to thank the thousands of plungers for the overwhelming support in the face of disappointment. I understand the implications of canceling an event of this magnitude that people have planned months in advance to attend.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The Polar Bear Plunge, which was canceled this past weekend because of safety concerns amid extreme conditions, has been rescheduled for March 8, organizers announced Tuesday. Winds as high as 35 mph and 3- to 4-foot waves that left snow and ice on the beach at Sandy Point State Park - where thousands romp into the freezing cold waters of the Chesapeake Bay each year - caused the event to be put on hold Saturday. "Keeping people safe is our first concern," said Jason Schriml, spokesman for Special Olympics Maryland, for which this year's event has already raised $1.6 million.
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