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Polar Express

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By Raven Smith and Raven Smith,raven.smith@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Click, clack, click, clack, click, clack, hiiiiiiiissssssss ... the train's wheels sputter and squeak as it rolls to a stop, causing rows of theater seats to rattle and shake. "Ready to go?" a kindly conductor asks. "Go ... where?" asks a puzzled young boy as he tugs on his blue robe. "Why, to the North Pole!" exclaims the conductor. They ride into the night, bound for holiday adventure. Click, clack, click, clack, click ... Like the conductor, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, which is not traditionally thought of as a holiday-time destination, is hoping that its The Polar Express 4-D Experience will stir up some holiday magic this year for visitors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Raven Smith and Raven Smith,raven.smith@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Click, clack, click, clack, click, clack, hiiiiiiiissssssss ... the train's wheels sputter and squeak as it rolls to a stop, causing rows of theater seats to rattle and shake. "Ready to go?" a kindly conductor asks. "Go ... where?" asks a puzzled young boy as he tugs on his blue robe. "Why, to the North Pole!" exclaims the conductor. They ride into the night, bound for holiday adventure. Click, clack, click, clack, click ... Like the conductor, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, which is not traditionally thought of as a holiday-time destination, is hoping that its The Polar Express 4-D Experience will stir up some holiday magic this year for visitors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By JESS BLUMBERG | November 28, 2002
Welcome the Christmas season with the reading of a holiday classic, then create a craft related to the story and enjoy hot chocolate and cookies. The Mountain Road Branch Library invites families with kids of all ages to attend "All Aboard the Polar Express" on Tuesday. Kids and their parents will enjoy The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg, a Caldecott-winning story. The book begins on Christmas Eve with a young boy boarding a train bound for the North Pole. Upon his arrival, the boy meets Santa and is told he can have any gift he wants.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
Go See Bee Season -- A marriage unravels, a daughter becomes a spelling bee champion, and the mystical world of Kabbalah makes heroes of words. Sun score: B-. The Ice Harvest -- John Cusack is a Kansas mob lawyer who, with partner-in-crime Billy Bob Thornton, tries to pull off the perfect crime, which includes stealing more than $2 million in mob money. Sun score: B-. To read Sun movie reviews: baltimoresun.com/movie Go Do Birthday party -- The American Visionary Art Museum turns 10 - and there's even cake this morning at 10 in the Tall Sculpture Barn and exhibit tours all day (free with admission, which is $7-$11)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | December 5, 2004
Last summer, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow proved a box-office fizzle -- the latest in a string of computer-enhanced movies that were ballyhooed as revolutionary advances in the art of filmmaking, but failed to connect with audiences. Moviegoers, however, may not find newfangled technology as off-putting as some industry analysts were beginning to think. Though its box-office performance was mediocre during its first two weeks in theaters, Robert Zemeckis' The Polar Express, based on Chris Van Allsburg's best-selling Christmas fable, is picking up serious steam.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 10, 2004
The Polar Express represents a technical advance that could revolutionize the film industry, all because Robert Zemeckis didn't want the fate of his next movie to ride on the shoulders of some 10-year-old. Friend and frequent collaborator Tom Hanks suggested about three years ago that Zemeckis adapt Chris Van Allsburg's streamlined children's classic, the illustrated story of a train taking skeptical children to the North Pole. But Zemeckis, who has rarely shied away from a technical challenge, balked - for reasons that were entirley human.
FEATURES
By Chris Van Allsburg | December 20, 1998
The North Pole. It was a huge city standing alone at the top of the world, filled with factories where every Christmas toy was made.At first they saw no elves."
FEATURES
By Greg Hernandez and Greg Hernandez,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | December 24, 2004
LOS ANGELES - While Warner Bros.' The Polar Express continues to chug along impressively at the multiplex, the 3-D giant-screen version of the film playing in IMAX theaters has quietly crossed $20 million in box office grosses, IMAX Corp. announced early this week. Polar is the highest-grossing IMAX version of a mainstream film that the company has ever released. The previous top-earner was The Matrix Reloaded, which earned more than $14 million in giant-screen ticket sales last year. "The way audiences have embraced this film speaks volumes about moviegoers' appetite for Hollywood blockbusters in IMAX's format, as well as their willingness to pay a premium for this immersive experience," IMAX co-chairmen and co-CEOs Richard L. Gelfond and Bradley J. Wechsler said in a statement.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 11, 2005
Cool! That's certainly the first word that comes to mind after watching Zathura, the latest film adaptation of a book by Chris Van Allsburg (Jumanji, The Polar Express) and easily the best. Zathura (Columbia Pictures). Starring Jonah Bobo, Josh Hutcherson, Dax Shepard. Directed by Jon Favreau. Rated PG. Time 113 minutes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 10, 2004
The Polar Express is like the coolest train set a kid ever had. It's not real and the faces on the toy people don't look human, but it has bells and whistles galore and will take you as far as your imagination allows. Based on the beloved children's book by Chris Van Allsburg, the movie depicts a boy on the cusp of one of the great tragedies of adolescence - the loss of belief in Santa Claus. Just when all seems lost, a magic train pulls up outside the boy's bedroom window and offers him a ride to the North Pole.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 11, 2005
Cool! That's certainly the first word that comes to mind after watching Zathura, the latest film adaptation of a book by Chris Van Allsburg (Jumanji, The Polar Express) and easily the best. Zathura (Columbia Pictures). Starring Jonah Bobo, Josh Hutcherson, Dax Shepard. Directed by Jon Favreau. Rated PG. Time 113 minutes.
FEATURES
By Greg Hernandez and Greg Hernandez,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | December 24, 2004
LOS ANGELES - While Warner Bros.' The Polar Express continues to chug along impressively at the multiplex, the 3-D giant-screen version of the film playing in IMAX theaters has quietly crossed $20 million in box office grosses, IMAX Corp. announced early this week. Polar is the highest-grossing IMAX version of a mainstream film that the company has ever released. The previous top-earner was The Matrix Reloaded, which earned more than $14 million in giant-screen ticket sales last year. "The way audiences have embraced this film speaks volumes about moviegoers' appetite for Hollywood blockbusters in IMAX's format, as well as their willingness to pay a premium for this immersive experience," IMAX co-chairmen and co-CEOs Richard L. Gelfond and Bradley J. Wechsler said in a statement.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
To look at the smile on Paul Doherty's face, it would seem that the box he heaved atop the counter at M.B. Klein's model train shop in Baltimore was for him. But this isn't so much about Doherty. This is about the Christmas when his 5-year-old son Connor comes of age and no longer has to rely on his father's old model rail system. "I got one when I was 10," Doherty, 38, said with the kind of grin that children give when they pull away the wrapper off a gift. "I still have that, and he plays with that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | December 5, 2004
Last summer, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow proved a box-office fizzle -- the latest in a string of computer-enhanced movies that were ballyhooed as revolutionary advances in the art of filmmaking, but failed to connect with audiences. Moviegoers, however, may not find newfangled technology as off-putting as some industry analysts were beginning to think. Though its box-office performance was mediocre during its first two weeks in theaters, Robert Zemeckis' The Polar Express, based on Chris Van Allsburg's best-selling Christmas fable, is picking up serious steam.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 12, 2004
Although it's not being screened in advance for critics - rarely a good sign - Seed of Chucky opens today with a built-in draw for Baltimoreans. Among the multiple victims of the murderous doll and his family is our own John Waters. "I get to be an accidental victim of his son, Glen, but Chucky is happy," says an apparently delighted Waters, who spent two days in Romania while his part was filmed. "I love the Chucky movies," Waters says. "I used to say in the press that it's the only movie I wanted to be in. I guess the director [Don Mancini]
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 10, 2004
The Polar Express represents a technical advance that could revolutionize the film industry, all because Robert Zemeckis didn't want the fate of his next movie to ride on the shoulders of some 10-year-old. Friend and frequent collaborator Tom Hanks suggested about three years ago that Zemeckis adapt Chris Van Allsburg's streamlined children's classic, the illustrated story of a train taking skeptical children to the North Pole. But Zemeckis, who has rarely shied away from a technical challenge, balked - for reasons that were entirley human.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 12, 2004
Although it's not being screened in advance for critics - rarely a good sign - Seed of Chucky opens today with a built-in draw for Baltimoreans. Among the multiple victims of the murderous doll and his family is our own John Waters. "I get to be an accidental victim of his son, Glen, but Chucky is happy," says an apparently delighted Waters, who spent two days in Romania while his part was filmed. "I love the Chucky movies," Waters says. "I used to say in the press that it's the only movie I wanted to be in. I guess the director [Don Mancini]
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
To look at the smile on Paul Doherty's face, it would seem that the box he heaved atop the counter at M.B. Klein's model train shop in Baltimore was for him. But this isn't so much about Doherty. This is about the Christmas when his 5-year-old son Connor comes of age and no longer has to rely on his father's old model rail system. "I got one when I was 10," Doherty, 38, said with the kind of grin that children give when they pull away the wrapper off a gift. "I still have that, and he plays with that.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 10, 2004
The Polar Express is like the coolest train set a kid ever had. It's not real and the faces on the toy people don't look human, but it has bells and whistles galore and will take you as far as your imagination allows. Based on the beloved children's book by Chris Van Allsburg, the movie depicts a boy on the cusp of one of the great tragedies of adolescence - the loss of belief in Santa Claus. Just when all seems lost, a magic train pulls up outside the boy's bedroom window and offers him a ride to the North Pole.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESS BLUMBERG | November 28, 2002
Welcome the Christmas season with the reading of a holiday classic, then create a craft related to the story and enjoy hot chocolate and cookies. The Mountain Road Branch Library invites families with kids of all ages to attend "All Aboard the Polar Express" on Tuesday. Kids and their parents will enjoy The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg, a Caldecott-winning story. The book begins on Christmas Eve with a young boy boarding a train bound for the North Pole. Upon his arrival, the boy meets Santa and is told he can have any gift he wants.
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