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By Anthony Lewis | August 27, 1993
IN POL POT time," Cambodians will say, they lost five or 10 or 70 members of their family. They use the name of the Khmer Rouge leader for the genocidal years of its rule, 1975-79.Prince Sihanouk and others in Cambodia's transitional government say they want to bring the Khmer Rouge in from its guerrilla strongholds to play some kind of role in the government. But how can they sit with mass-murderers? I put the question to Prince Sirivudh, the foreign minister, who lost many in his family."
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 17, 2013
"Why are there no libertarian countries?" In a much-discussed essay for Salon magazine, Michael Lind asks: "If libertarians are correct in claiming that they understand how best to organize a modern society, how is it that not a single country in the world in the early twenty-first century is organized along libertarian lines?" Such is the philosophical poverty of liberalism today that this stands as a profound question. Definitions vary, but broadly speaking, libertarianism is the idea that people should be as free as possible from state coercion so long as they don't harm anyone.
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NEWS
June 20, 1997
In decades of war in Southeast Asia there was never anythin quite like it.If you were a teacher, you were killed. If you wore glasses, you were killed. If you were a teacher, doctor or laywer, you were killed. If you lived in the capital, Phnom Penh, you were forcibly moved to the countryside. And then killed.That was Pol Pot's Cambodia. As leader of the guerrilla army called the Khmer Rouge, he ruled the country from 1975 to 1979 and oversaw a regime that through starvation and torture and bullets murdered at least a million people for, in most cases, no reason other than that they could read, lived in a city or were not Khmer Rouge.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 8, 2006
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba -- The position of the European left and liberal Democrats on the detention center for suspected terrorists captured on the battlefield has been this: American troops are torturing people on U.S. territory and denying them their civil and human rights. Democratic Sen. Richard J. Durbin of Illinois said so in a Senate floor speech June 14, 2005: "If I ... did not tell you that it was an FBI agent describing what Americans had done to prisoners in their control, you would most certainly believe this must have been done by Nazis, Soviets in their gulags, or some mad regime - Pol Pot or others - that had no concern for human beings.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 23, 1998
PARIS -- The two million or so murders for which Pol Pot and his movement were responsible in Cambodia all were inspired by a desire to outstrip in revolutionary zeal the Chinese cultural revolution, so as to cleanse Cambodia of "all sorts of depraved cultures and social blemishes."A naive ideological vision of agrarian utopia, stripped of urban and bourgeois influences, was responsible for this genocidal program. It had been worked up in student leftist circles in Paris after World War II, and adopted by the man who later renamed himself Pol Pot. The principal author of the ideology, which he developed in the thesis he presented at the Sorbonne in the 1950s, is still alive, in the Cambodian forest.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Pol Pot's death closes a horrific chapter in Southeast Asia's recent past. But it also recalls an inglorious moment in American history.As Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge forces killed perhaps 2 million fellow Cambodians in pursuit of their bizarre agrarian utopia from 1975 to 1979, the United States stood by passively, immobilized by a post-Vietnam aversion to foreign entanglements."There was no response," said Morton Abramowitz, ambassador neighboring Thailand in the late 1970s. "The world has never stopped genocide anywhere, and Cambodia is no exception."
NEWS
June 20, 1997
DURING the four years that the Khmer Rouge ruled Cambodia, 1975 to 1979, at least one million Cambodians -- one of eight -- died of execution, murder, land mines, warfare, starvation or disease. Perhaps two million. More fled, mostly to Thailand and camps of awful squalor.The slaughterer of his own people was a Cambodian peasant who learned his Marxism as a student in Paris and returned to lead the Communist insurgency, adopting the pseudonym Pol Pot. He wound up as Cambodia's dictator, enforcing his own versions of ideological and national purity.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has ordered the Defense, State and Justice departments to devise plans for the arrest and trial of Pol Pot, the shadowy Khmer Rouge leader responsible for the death of perhaps a million Cambodians in the 1970s.Clinton administration officials and Western diplomats said that the Khmer Rouge appeared to be near collapse as a result of mass defections and internal fighting. Pol Pot and other Khmer Rouge leaders are said to be in hiding in the Cambodian jungle only a few miles across the border with Thailand.
NEWS
July 31, 1997
THE SHOW TRIAL of Pol Pot, witnessed by one Western journalist who could identify him, is the first solid evidence that one of the world's most monstrous tyrants has been alive in the 18 years since he was last seen.The tyrant was unknown when he launched a campaign of murder, starvation, torture and intimidation that killed one and perhaps two million of his eight million compatriots in order, he said, to purify them. Four years of hideous misrule ended in 1979 when Communist Vietnam's army overran Communist Cambodia to the relief of its people.
NEWS
April 17, 1998
POL POT came from a prosperous Cambodian peasant family and was fortunate after World War II to be sent to Paris to study electronics. He flunked, becoming instead a person of unnatural evil and cruelty, who acted out of twisted nationalistic and ideological belief.He became boss of the little Cambodian Communist Party in 1963 and led an insurrection five years later. His band of armed children was dubbed the Khmer Rouge, or Red Cambodians, by Prince Norodom Sihanouk, who repressed them without mercy.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - I don't think Sen. Richard J. Durbin's overheated remarks about detainee abuse at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have given the aid and comfort to al-Qaida that some of his overheated critics say they have. But there's no denying the glee the Illinois Democrat's remarks have given to Republicans. By providing his own hide as a convenient pincushion, the Senate's second-ranking Democrat has given the GOP something cheerier to discuss than the reports of detainee abuse that continue to ooze out of the Guantanamo prison camp.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - His voice choking, Illinois Sen. Richard J. Durbin took to the Senate floor yesterday and offered "heartfelt apologies" for comparing America's treatment of prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay detention center to the Nazis, Soviets and other murderous regimes. The apology came after a week of drumbeat criticism against Durbin, the assistant Democratic leader, from the White House, from Republican senators, from conservative activists and, finally, from Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, a fellow Democrat.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 13, 2005
WHAT A visitor from another planet would learn about our national culture by tuning into the NFL playoffs: Only the scariest-looking Americans - mostly fat men wearing face-paint and too-tight team jerseys, their heads adorned with Viking horns, Patriot tricorner hats, etc. - are allowed in the stands at football games. Based on total air time, the single most important issue facing Americans is: Who's been stealing Bud Light from unsuspecting beer drinkers and replacing it with Miller Lite?
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and By Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2000
Twenty-five years ago in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh, the family of Ly Y began its slow journey into the darkness of a four-year midnight. Forced to evacuate the city, his family was shunted along with thousands of others to a distant rural province. Psychologically speaking, his destination was a landscape somewhere between the Dark Ages, the Inquisition and the Reign of Terror. So began the rule of Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge, who from 1975 to 1979 presided over a cultural stripping-down of Cambodia that emptied its cities, schools and businesses while wiping out nearly a quarter of the country's 7.8 million people, through executions, starvation and disease.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 23, 1998
PARIS -- The two million or so murders for which Pol Pot and his movement were responsible in Cambodia all were inspired by a desire to outstrip in revolutionary zeal the Chinese cultural revolution, so as to cleanse Cambodia of "all sorts of depraved cultures and social blemishes."A naive ideological vision of agrarian utopia, stripped of urban and bourgeois influences, was responsible for this genocidal program. It had been worked up in student leftist circles in Paris after World War II, and adopted by the man who later renamed himself Pol Pot. The principal author of the ideology, which he developed in the thesis he presented at the Sorbonne in the 1950s, is still alive, in the Cambodian forest.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 20, 1998
A good thing Bill Clinton gets only two terms. It means Ken Starr cannot have a third.Paula Jones is appealing, sort of.With Pol Pot gone, Saddam Hussein will have to suffice in the demon department.Mount Vernon will get central air conditioning so that tourists will no longer pass out in 100-degree rooms in August. Is nothing sacred?Pub Date: 4/20/98
NEWS
October 27, 1997
IN HIS book, "Drawing Life: Surviving the Unabomber," David Gelernter argues that our society has become "too squeamish to call evil by its right name." Mauled by a mail bomb, he is using his own pain to point out the price we pay by shying away from judgment, by refusing to recognize evil and call it by name.Americans, Mr. Gelernter believes, have become more interested in nurturing victimhood than in using good judgment and denouncing evil. Surely any sane person could agree that the masterminds of the Holocaust were evil, but even that horrific chapter in history spurs some people to hedge their bets, saying only that Hitler was "regarded" as evil.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 1997
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Pol Pot, one of the most brutal dictators of the century, was reported to be on the run yesterday in a remote jungle, pursued by guerrilla fighters he once commanded.Responsible for the murder of as many as 2 million of his countrymen, Pol Pot was being protected by about 300 armed men after ordering the killing of one of his chief lieutenants, a Cambodian government official said.It appeared to be a final, fatal split in the inner circle of his movement, the Khmer Rouge, which ruled Cambodia in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Pol Pot's death closes a horrific chapter in Southeast Asia's recent past. But it also recalls an inglorious moment in American history.As Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge forces killed perhaps 2 million fellow Cambodians in pursuit of their bizarre agrarian utopia from 1975 to 1979, the United States stood by passively, immobilized by a post-Vietnam aversion to foreign entanglements."There was no response," said Morton Abramowitz, ambassador neighboring Thailand in the late 1970s. "The world has never stopped genocide anywhere, and Cambodia is no exception."
NEWS
April 17, 1998
POL POT came from a prosperous Cambodian peasant family and was fortunate after World War II to be sent to Paris to study electronics. He flunked, becoming instead a person of unnatural evil and cruelty, who acted out of twisted nationalistic and ideological belief.He became boss of the little Cambodian Communist Party in 1963 and led an insurrection five years later. His band of armed children was dubbed the Khmer Rouge, or Red Cambodians, by Prince Norodom Sihanouk, who repressed them without mercy.
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