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NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
The co-owner of a South Baltimore club who faces criminal charges for organizing an illegal poker tournament also owes the state nearly $1 million in back taxes stemming from an unrelated case, the state comptroller's office announced yesterday. Joseph A. Cary and his wife, Deborah, owe the state $953,515, said Kevin Kane, a media relations officer for the comptroller's office. Kane said an audit of the Carys' vending machine business, Statewide Amusement Inc., showed that the Pasadena company's gross receipts did not match the sum that they filed with their taxes.
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NEWS
November 22, 2006
8th-grader with knife arrested at school A 13-year-old eighth-grader at Elkridge Landing Middle School was arrested yesterday morning after school staff members confiscated a pocket knife that he displayed on a bus earlier in the morning. The boy, whose identity is being withheld because of his age, was charged as a juvenile with possessing a weapon on school property. Police said the boy showed classmates the 4-inch pocket knife during a bus ride to the Elkridge school. Students later reported him to school staff members.
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NEWS
November 22, 2006
8th-grader with knife arrested at school A 13-year-old eighth-grader at Elkridge Landing Middle School was arrested yesterday morning after school staff members confiscated a pocket knife that he displayed on a bus earlier in the morning. The boy, whose identity is being withheld because of his age, was charged as a juvenile with possessing a weapon on school property. Police said the boy showed classmates the 4-inch pocket knife during a bus ride to the Elkridge school. Students later reported him to school staff members.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | January 28, 2006
The organizer of a well-publicized poker tournament and six dealers hired to manage the games received probation before judgment and fines after pleading guilty to illegal gambling charges in Baltimore District Court yesterday. Event organizer Gerald C. Dickens, 65, had been charged with 25 counts of illegal gambling as a result of a Nov. 2 police raid at the Owl's Nest in South Baltimore. As part of a plea agreement, the Bowie resident pleaded guilty to only three charges -- one for each night an undercover police detective observed him operating the illegal poker tournament.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | December 17, 2005
Police who raided an illegal poker tournament at the Owl's Nest in South Baltimore have filed gambling charges against the club's co-managers, as well as a security guard, two barmaids and a number of card dealers. Club co-manager Joseph A. Cary, 51, of Pasadena was charged with 19 counts of illegal gaming and gambling stemming from the Nov. 2 raid. And co-manager Gerald C. Dickens, 65, of Bowie was charged with 25 counts of illegal gaming and gambling. The men were also charged with two counts each of illegal liquor sales and possession.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | January 28, 2006
The organizer of a well-publicized poker tournament and six dealers hired to manage the games received probation before judgment and fines after pleading guilty to illegal gambling charges in Baltimore District Court yesterday. Event organizer Gerald C. Dickens, 65, had been charged with 25 counts of illegal gambling as a result of a Nov. 2 police raid at the Owl's Nest in South Baltimore. As part of a plea agreement, the Bowie resident pleaded guilty to only three charges -- one for each night an undercover police detective observed him operating the illegal poker tournament.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2005
Despite the success of the taped ESPN World Series of Poker telecasts, there is a question about whether audiences will be satisfied with getting their fix of flops, turns and rivers delayed over months, or if they will demand more immediate gratification. Say, with live poker. Professional player Howard Lederer believes that TV poker will have to take the leap to live broadcasts, despite potential pitfalls such as long stretches of boring hands and the unpredictability of how long a game will last.
NEWS
November 26, 1998
Stu "The Kid" Ungar, 45, a professional poker player who won major tournaments and millions of dollars, was found dead Sunday in a motel on the Las Vegas Strip. An autopsy was planned. Friends and colleagues told the Las Vegas Review-Journal that Mr. Ungar had been addicted to illegal drugs and suffered from numerous health problems.He won the World Series of Poker tournament at Binion's Horseshoe casino in 1980, 1981 and 1997, the year he defeated more than 300 competitors to take home a $1.1 million pot. He once lost $1 million in a single craps session and dropped hundreds of thousands of dollars in no-limit poker games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
Ben Affleck needs to find a new line of work. Nothing against the guy. He has served his term as movie star in an exemplary fashion. He drank to excess, gambled obscene piles of money and was photographed way too much. He said foolish things to the wrong people, lavished cocktail waitresses with extravagant tips and dated Jennifer Lopez. What more could anyone ask of a movie star, except perhaps a short jail term? The problem with Affleck, it seems, is in his ability to make the right decisions when it comes to the movie roles he chooses.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | November 9, 2005
Anne Arundel County accountant Steve Dannenmann, who finished second at the World Series of Poker in July, won $100,000 yesterday when he finished fifth at the Tournament of Champions at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The Tournament of Champions, with a prize pool of $2 million, started Sunday with a field of 114 players including the highest point-earners from a national poker circuit sponsored by Harrah's Entertainment. The field included former World Series main event champions Doyle Brunson, Phil Hellmuth and Johnnie Chan.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | December 17, 2005
Police who raided an illegal poker tournament at the Owl's Nest in South Baltimore have filed gambling charges against the club's co-managers, as well as a security guard, two barmaids and a number of card dealers. Club co-manager Joseph A. Cary, 51, of Pasadena was charged with 19 counts of illegal gaming and gambling stemming from the Nov. 2 raid. And co-manager Gerald C. Dickens, 65, of Bowie was charged with 25 counts of illegal gaming and gambling. The men were also charged with two counts each of illegal liquor sales and possession.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
The co-owner of a South Baltimore club who faces criminal charges for organizing an illegal poker tournament also owes the state nearly $1 million in back taxes stemming from an unrelated case, the state comptroller's office announced yesterday. Joseph A. Cary and his wife, Deborah, owe the state $953,515, said Kevin Kane, a media relations officer for the comptroller's office. Kane said an audit of the Carys' vending machine business, Statewide Amusement Inc., showed that the Pasadena company's gross receipts did not match the sum that they filed with their taxes.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | November 9, 2005
Anne Arundel County accountant Steve Dannenmann, who finished second at the World Series of Poker in July, won $100,000 yesterday when he finished fifth at the Tournament of Champions at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The Tournament of Champions, with a prize pool of $2 million, started Sunday with a field of 114 players including the highest point-earners from a national poker circuit sponsored by Harrah's Entertainment. The field included former World Series main event champions Doyle Brunson, Phil Hellmuth and Johnnie Chan.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | November 9, 2005
Anne Arundel accountant Steve Dannenmann, who won $4.25 million at the World Series of Poker in July, advanced yesterday to the final table in the Tournament of Champions at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas . The Tournament of Champions, with a prize pool of $2 million , started Sunday with a field of 114 players including the highest point-earners from a national poker circuit sponsored by Harrah's Entertainment. The field included former World Series main event champions Doyle Brunson, Phil Hellmuth and Johnnie Chan.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2005
Despite the success of the taped ESPN World Series of Poker telecasts, there is a question about whether audiences will be satisfied with getting their fix of flops, turns and rivers delayed over months, or if they will demand more immediate gratification. Say, with live poker. Professional player Howard Lederer believes that TV poker will have to take the leap to live broadcasts, despite potential pitfalls such as long stretches of boring hands and the unpredictability of how long a game will last.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
Ben Affleck needs to find a new line of work. Nothing against the guy. He has served his term as movie star in an exemplary fashion. He drank to excess, gambled obscene piles of money and was photographed way too much. He said foolish things to the wrong people, lavished cocktail waitresses with extravagant tips and dated Jennifer Lopez. What more could anyone ask of a movie star, except perhaps a short jail term? The problem with Affleck, it seems, is in his ability to make the right decisions when it comes to the movie roles he chooses.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | November 9, 2005
Anne Arundel accountant Steve Dannenmann, who won $4.25 million at the World Series of Poker in July, advanced yesterday to the final table in the Tournament of Champions at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas . The Tournament of Champions, with a prize pool of $2 million , started Sunday with a field of 114 players including the highest point-earners from a national poker circuit sponsored by Harrah's Entertainment. The field included former World Series main event champions Doyle Brunson, Phil Hellmuth and Johnnie Chan.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Las Vegas it's not. But on Thursday nights, Sliders Bar and Grill across from Camden Yards has karaoke downstairs and No Limit Texas Hold 'Em upstairs, with $2 beer for the players. Texas Hold 'Em has swept into Baltimore and you can play somewhere every day of the week, including the occasional Sunday at the 5th Regiment Armory, and outdoors on Fridays and Saturdays at the yuppie block party on Water Street. "I love it. It's out of the world," says Darin Loveland, 30, a dealer at Sliders.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Las Vegas it's not. But on Thursday nights, Sliders Bar and Grill across from Camden Yards has karaoke downstairs and No Limit Texas Hold 'Em upstairs, with $2 beer for the players. Texas Hold 'Em has swept into Baltimore and you can play somewhere every day of the week, including the occasional Sunday at the 5th Regiment Armory, and outdoors on Fridays and Saturdays at the yuppie block party on Water Street. "I love it. It's out of the world," says Darin Loveland, 30, a dealer at Sliders.
NEWS
November 26, 1998
Stu "The Kid" Ungar, 45, a professional poker player who won major tournaments and millions of dollars, was found dead Sunday in a motel on the Las Vegas Strip. An autopsy was planned. Friends and colleagues told the Las Vegas Review-Journal that Mr. Ungar had been addicted to illegal drugs and suffered from numerous health problems.He won the World Series of Poker tournament at Binion's Horseshoe casino in 1980, 1981 and 1997, the year he defeated more than 300 competitors to take home a $1.1 million pot. He once lost $1 million in a single craps session and dropped hundreds of thousands of dollars in no-limit poker games.
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