Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPoker Player
IN THE NEWS

Poker Player

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
October 4, 2012
Wow. County Executive Ulman disagrees with your puritanical anti-gambling view (editorial, Sept. 27). Although you ascribe ulterior motives to his position, maybe he simply realizes that Marylanders like to gamble, and that they would like to gamble in Maryland. As a Maryland poker player who is tired of driving to New Jersey, Delaware and West Virginia, to play poker (a game that a New York judge recently ruled a game of skill, not chance), I urge Columbians to vote in favor of Question 7, which "allows" table games, including poker, so we can finally play here in a regulated, taxed, and secure Maryland poker room.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
As three lawyers for Maryland Live casino entered a federal courtroom Friday morning, it seemed that a list containing information on hundreds of high rollers was on the line, a trove they suspected had been taken by a former employee who had left for a competitor. But as the morning wore on, documents established that the lawyers' problem was considerably smaller. Helena Wong, a former host at Maryland Live, had emailed just 19 elite players. And Wong, who now works at Baltimore's Horseshoe casino, testified that she had gathered the names gradually in the course of her job and had not pulled off a grand heist before leaving.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and Stephen R. Proctor,Sun Staff | April 20, 2003
Positively Fifth Street, by James McManus. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 416 pages. $26. Positively Fifth Street explores those two most American of pastimes -- poker and murder. It is the story of Texas no-limit hold 'em -- the ultimate high-stakes card game -- and the sharpies who flock to Las Vegas every spring for a showdown in the World Series of Poker. And it is the story of the grisly murder of Ted Binion -- a heroin addict and roustabout whose father founded the World Series and who dies, in classic Vegas style, at the hands of a stripper and her boyfriend.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Michael Phelps surprised his best friend and roommate earlier this week by dropping into his poker match in Montreal. "Pumped for the kid today!!" Phelps Tweeted when he arrived at the World Poker Tour competition to support Jeff Gross. "Just surprised him for the final 6 of the #wptmontreal. " Phelps later said in an interview with WPT.com that he had to be there for his buddy. "Gotta support the kid," he told WPT. "Jeff has been my best friend for a long time. I know how excited he is about tonight.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2005
My Poker Player, who won the Maryland Million Sprint a year ago, has been on a vacation, recovering from what humans might term burnout. After 2 1/2 years of making his living pounding East Coast racetracks from here to New York, My Poker Player needed a breather. Now, after three months of rest, he's back, and both owner Roddy Valente and trainer Bruce Levine say he is ready to run. "We've freshened him up," said Valente, who owns a construction company in Albany, N.Y. "He couldn't be any better," said Levine, who brings the 5-year-old son of Not For Love to Laurel Park today in hopes of a repeat win in the $150,000 Sprint.
NEWS
October 29, 2012
When you critically analyze a problem, you can come up with minor faults, major faults, and faults that are inexcusable. I am writing about an inexcusable fault in the bill that supports expanded casino gambling in the state of Maryland ("Path to jobs or bad bet for Md.?" Oct. 25). Let me say that I am a poker player. I am not against casinos in general. I am against giving a gambling license to an outfit that consorts with organized crime. This same outfit once operated in the state of New Jersey.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | February 6, 2007
Tell me, why is it that a course of action that is regarded as folly in virtually every other comparable endeavor is seen as virtue and wisdom when America wages war? In poker, do we call a man a "defeatist" who, when he sees he has a losing hand, folds rather than increasing his bet? No, we recognize that every good poker player knows better than to throw good money after bad. In games of strategy such as chess and Go, what do we call a player who ignores the signs that a part of the board is escaping his control and instead continues to invest his moves in that lost territory?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Michael Phelps surprised his best friend and roommate earlier this week by dropping into his poker match in Montreal. "Pumped for the kid today!!" Phelps Tweeted when he arrived at the World Poker Tour competition to support Jeff Gross. "Just surprised him for the final 6 of the #wptmontreal. " Phelps later said in an interview with WPT.com that he had to be there for his buddy. "Gotta support the kid," he told WPT. "Jeff has been my best friend for a long time. I know how excited he is about tonight.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
The foal was a big one, and it was a rough birth. Wantyoutowantme, the 6-year-old mare, suffered for three days until she had to be euthanized. An autopsy revealed that the foal had punctured his mother's kidney with one of his hoofs. That foal is now a 2-year-old gelding named What's Up Lonely. And yesterday, he charged from sixth as the even-money favorite to win the six-furlong, $100,000 Maryland Million Nursery at Pimlico Race Course by 1 1/4 lengths. Costas Triantafilos, one of the gelding's owners and owner of the Costas Inn restaurant on North Point Boulevard, pulled Cynthia McGinnes into the winner's circle to tell the story.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
As three lawyers for Maryland Live casino entered a federal courtroom Friday morning, it seemed that a list containing information on hundreds of high rollers was on the line, a trove they suspected had been taken by a former employee who had left for a competitor. But as the morning wore on, documents established that the lawyers' problem was considerably smaller. Helena Wong, a former host at Maryland Live, had emailed just 19 elite players. And Wong, who now works at Baltimore's Horseshoe casino, testified that she had gathered the names gradually in the course of her job and had not pulled off a grand heist before leaving.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Caesars Entertainment, which plans to bring a casino to Baltimore, announced Thursday that it would spend $25 million more and hire 500 more people than originally planned to take advantage of opportunities presented by the passage of Question 7. Caesars now will build a higher-end Horseshoe-brand casino rather than a Harrah's on the Baltimore site near M&T Bank Stadium that will focus on table games such as poker and black jack. The Las Vegas-based company had long hinted it would invest more if Maryland expanded gambling because it believes it will draw dedicated cardplayers from around the country to the casino, which now will feature a World Series of Poker room and host series events.
NEWS
October 29, 2012
When you critically analyze a problem, you can come up with minor faults, major faults, and faults that are inexcusable. I am writing about an inexcusable fault in the bill that supports expanded casino gambling in the state of Maryland ("Path to jobs or bad bet for Md.?" Oct. 25). Let me say that I am a poker player. I am not against casinos in general. I am against giving a gambling license to an outfit that consorts with organized crime. This same outfit once operated in the state of New Jersey.
EXPLORE
October 4, 2012
Wow. County Executive Ulman disagrees with your puritanical anti-gambling view (editorial, Sept. 27). Although you ascribe ulterior motives to his position, maybe he simply realizes that Marylanders like to gamble, and that they would like to gamble in Maryland. As a Maryland poker player who is tired of driving to New Jersey, Delaware and West Virginia, to play poker (a game that a New York judge recently ruled a game of skill, not chance), I urge Columbians to vote in favor of Question 7, which "allows" table games, including poker, so we can finally play here in a regulated, taxed, and secure Maryland poker room.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 29, 2012
Mark Turgeon would make a lousy poker player. Everything he's thinking is right there on his face. Or in his body language. And even when it's not, Maryland's coach is almost genetically incapable of holding anything back when it comes to discussing the Terps . Earlier this season, he called redshirt freshman forward Ashton Pankey "brain-dead at times" before adding that "he's a very smart player. " After Maryland's 73-69 win over Virginia Tech on Saturday at Comcast Center, he said high-scoring sophomore guard Terrell Stoglin "was a little selfish" in the first half and was benched twice for poor shot selection.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | February 6, 2007
Tell me, why is it that a course of action that is regarded as folly in virtually every other comparable endeavor is seen as virtue and wisdom when America wages war? In poker, do we call a man a "defeatist" who, when he sees he has a losing hand, folds rather than increasing his bet? No, we recognize that every good poker player knows better than to throw good money after bad. In games of strategy such as chess and Go, what do we call a player who ignores the signs that a part of the board is escaping his control and instead continues to invest his moves in that lost territory?
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
Surviving a week-and-a-half card-playing marathon, a Dundalk native who now lives in Rockville joins eight other players today at the final table of the World Series of Poker Texas Hold 'em World Championship where the first-place prize will be $12 million. Rhett Butler, a 45-year old insurance agent who spent his early childhood in the Baltimore area but has lived in Rockville for most of his life, enters the final round of the tournament with the seventh largest chip stack, nearly 2.4 million chips.
SPORTS
By Steve Dannenmann and Steve Dannenmann,Baltimoresun.com Staff | August 11, 2005
Steve Dannenmann finished second the World Series of Poker main event in Las Vegas on July 16. The 38-year-old Anne Arundel County accountant took home $4.25 million in the No-Limit Texas Hold 'Em Championship. Matthew, Des Moines, Iowa: Did you qualify for this year's WSOP by playing poker online, and if so, how significant a role did this play in your success? Steve Dannenmann: My friend, Jerry Ditzell, and I put up $5,000 each. And right after the tournament Jerry and I went to the cashier's cage at the Rio and split the money.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 29, 2012
Mark Turgeon would make a lousy poker player. Everything he's thinking is right there on his face. Or in his body language. And even when it's not, Maryland's coach is almost genetically incapable of holding anything back when it comes to discussing the Terps . Earlier this season, he called redshirt freshman forward Ashton Pankey "brain-dead at times" before adding that "he's a very smart player. " After Maryland's 73-69 win over Virginia Tech on Saturday at Comcast Center, he said high-scoring sophomore guard Terrell Stoglin "was a little selfish" in the first half and was benched twice for poor shot selection.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 21, 2006
In poker, as with most things, there's no free lunch. Whatever a player hopes to gain from the game, there's a price to be paid - in study, time and often, cash. But occasionally, you really might get lunch paid for, or dinner, or more. At some Atlantic City casinos, poker rooms have developed loyalty programs - roughly patterned after airline frequent flier clubs - to reward customers. Many casino-goers are already familiar with the player cards that are used by slot machine patrons.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | November 10, 2005
City prosecutors announced yesterday that they would throw out gambling charges against 80 poker players swept up in a recent police raid at a South Baltimore club because officers had used the wrong subsection of law in filling out the tickets they distributed the night of the raid. Although the poker players - many of whom thought the tournament at the Owl's Nest was legal because organizers said some proceeds would go to charity - could be recharged, city prosecutors said they would take no further action because it would be a waste of court resources.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.