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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1996: George Burns dies at 100 1996: Rappers Tupac, Biggie slain 1999: "Homicide" canceled 1999: Pokemon catches fire
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BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
A full news cycle after Alex Jones' CNN meltdown, the conservative radio show host -- dubbed the most paranoid man in America -- is still trending. David Bowie's new single is rising up the digital charts and a number of tech stories are gaining traction, fueled by the CES in Las Vegas. || ONLINE TRENDS ||  Alex Jones Trending on: National Twitter Why: It is a rare person indeed who can make Piers Morgan seem understated, but on Monday night conspiracy theorist and gun rights advocate Alex Jones did just that. In what's become the clip heard 'round the world, Jones, who started the White House petition (now with over 100,000 signatures)
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BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
A full news cycle after Alex Jones' CNN meltdown, the conservative radio show host -- dubbed the most paranoid man in America -- is still trending. David Bowie's new single is rising up the digital charts and a number of tech stories are gaining traction, fueled by the CES in Las Vegas. || ONLINE TRENDS ||  Alex Jones Trending on: National Twitter Why: It is a rare person indeed who can make Piers Morgan seem understated, but on Monday night conspiracy theorist and gun rights advocate Alex Jones did just that. In what's become the clip heard 'round the world, Jones, who started the White House petition (now with over 100,000 signatures)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter and Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 8, 2004
Whoa, Pikachu ... we're not in Kansas anymore. And you thought you had seen it all when it came to Pokemania. Those who grew up playing the original Pokemon classics for the Game Boy and N64 are in for a surprise. Those who skipped the whole thing because it somehow seemed too light and fluffy might want to take a closer look. Pokemon Colosseum ($50, for the Nintendo GameCube) in the game's title is fitting. As with the original in Rome, there are some dark and nasty elements to this one. This ain't your kid brother's Pokemon.
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes | August 25, 1999
Pokemon, the children's cartoon/video game/trading card game that originated in Japan, has meant millions of dollars in revenues for U.S. companies that sell Pokemon merchandise.Next up: Pokemon card playing leagues in all 50 states. Maryland's local leagues include ones sponsored by Outtabounds, in Crofton, and The Dugoutzone, in Eldersburg.Lisa Orman, spokeswoman for Zany Brainy, a multimedia toy store chain, says that all five Zany Brainy stores in Maryland -- including ones in Annapolis, Columbia and Timonium -- will soon sponsor Pokemon leagues.
NEWS
October 30, 1999
QUESTION RESPONSESIn October, we asked people to comment on a suit brought by West Coast parents against the manufacturer of Pokemon on the grounds that it promotes illegal gambling, and on the Pokemon craze in general: Can a holographic Charzard card really be worth more than Roger Clemens' rookie card, and does Pokemon have any educational value?Pokemon cards are the creative outlet of the Nineties.If Leonardo DaVinci were alive today, he wouldn't be painting Mona Lisa; he'd be drawing Pokemon cards.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 27, 1999
A CONVENTION of trading card carriers convened on a city street recently, taking both kid and parent beyond frustration to anger and despair. A Pokemon commonplace, it began with proud collectors showing prized acquisitions to friends.They sat on the sidewalk going through their hand-carried archive of cards in ring binders.Not much time passed before one or more of the cards -- the more expensive and rare ones, of course -- went missing. One of the conventioneers was fingered as the likely culprit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cox News Service | November 21, 1999
You hear them everywhere -- especially if you are a parent -- kids talking about Pokemon. Talking and talking, virtual audio encyclopedias of Pokemon facts and ephemera: of Kadabra, Professor Oak and Ash, psychic and grass cards, basic and booster packs, bubble beams and breeders.Even with a hit Pokemon movie out, the latest whoosh in a kid- focused marketing blizzard that has taken the country by storm, most adults are pretty much mystified by all this lingo. They're left dumbfounded as tots flip through their prized albums of Pokemon trading cards, trying in vain to educate their elders.
NEWS
September 28, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times, which was published Friday.IT IS with a straight face that we report that the parents of five San Diego children filed a class-action lawsuit recently alleging that the makers of the wildly popular Pokemon trading cards are setting their kids on the road to rack and ruin by encouraging them to, well, gamble.In essence, the complaint alleges that collecting trading cards is a form of illegal gambling because the odds of finding any one of the 150 different cards in any given package vary greatly.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 8, 1999
A WORD OR TWO about the Pokemon craze, which is even more annoying than the Beanie Baby craze and the Rugrats craze and the $15 yo-yo craze and every other toy craze since the hula hoop.First, let me be perfectly honest here: I'm not exactly sure what the heck Pokemon is, OK?All I know is that my 8-year-old has all these trading cards with pictures of colorful little creatures that look like . . . well, I'm staring at one now called Oddish that looks like a mutant head of lettuce -- a head of lettuce with legs, if you can imagine that.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 16, 2003
You don't hear much about Pokemon anymore; perhaps it's yet another one of those kids crazes (like coonskin caps and Beanie Babies) that have simply run their course. Too bad. Pokemon Heroes, the fifth film about these fantastic creatures with the fantastic powers, may be the best of the lot. It's fast-paced, lushly drawn and filled with way-cool touches (such as one Pokemon's power to let his sister see everything he sees). It's also brimming with values that should serve its young audience well: altruism, friendship, self-sacrifice, responsibility.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
If you know the term Yu-Gi-Oh!, it probably means one of three things: You have children, you are very hip or you were at Towson Town Center yesterday. The mall was swarmed by fanatics of Yu-Gi-Oh! - the latest Japanese trading-card game craze - which makes Pokemon seem as passe as Cabbage Patch Kids and Space Invaders. Baltimore is seventh on a 12-city tour marketing the game and its accessories. "I'm crazed and freaked out about it," said Zak Deickman, 13, of Bel Air, who has covered the walls of his bedroom with game posters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2002
Samuel Tucker Jacobson, a pupil at Deerfield Elementary School in Edgewood, died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a nine-month battle with leukemia. He was 9. Tucker, who was born in Towson and lived in Edgewood, had completed third grade at Deerfield Elementary School when diagnosed with leukemia in August. An avid video game fan and Pokemon collector, Tucker was a rambunctious and energetic child who could at times be delightfully mischievous, said his mother, Dawn Jacobson. "He was the kind of child who always made you laugh.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder Tribune | April 7, 2001
News of Pokemon's death may have been premature. Fans of the animated miniature monsters will be pleasantly surprised with a plot that pumps a little psychological complexity in the franchise. With a story that focuses on characters who have good reasons for doing wrong, "Pokemon 3: The Movie" actually elicits a few tears in between the battles. The plot revolves around Molly, a child whose mother is gone -- probably dead -- and whose father disappears while researching an ancient Pokemon called Unown.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
If life experience mattered much in the game of Pokemon, Jim Van Fleet would have wiped out the competition yesterday. But this is a kid's game, not an adult's. And in his first round at the Pokemon Trading Card Game Tour, 42-year-old Van Fleet was soundly beaten by 15-year-old John Gluth. "Kids have a genius for this," said Van Fleet of Lewisburg, Pa. "They play game after game, for hour after hour. I think they have an advantage that way - adults don't have that kind of time." Which isn't to say that adults don't have the interest.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
How weird is it that the villain of "Pokemon the Movie 2000" is a guy whose only crime is that he collects Pokemon? Pretty weird, given that the billion-dollar Pokemon franchise rests squarely on the backs of hordes of pre-teen Pokemon collectors who will spend every last dollar, and badger every last parent, to possess everything associated with Pikachu and brethren. But there are worse uses for entertainment dollars. "Pokemon the Movie 2000" will keep kids happy and parents mildly entertained.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2002
Samuel Tucker Jacobson, a pupil at Deerfield Elementary School in Edgewood, died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a nine-month battle with leukemia. He was 9. Tucker, who was born in Towson and lived in Edgewood, had completed third grade at Deerfield Elementary School when diagnosed with leukemia in August. An avid video game fan and Pokemon collector, Tucker was a rambunctious and energetic child who could at times be delightfully mischievous, said his mother, Dawn Jacobson. "He was the kind of child who always made you laugh.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder Tribune | April 7, 2001
News of Pokemon's death may have been premature. Fans of the animated miniature monsters will be pleasantly surprised with a plot that pumps a little psychological complexity in the franchise. With a story that focuses on characters who have good reasons for doing wrong, "Pokemon 3: The Movie" actually elicits a few tears in between the battles. The plot revolves around Molly, a child whose mother is gone -- probably dead -- and whose father disappears while researching an ancient Pokemon called Unown.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1996: George Burns dies at 100 1996: Rappers Tupac, Biggie slain 1999: "Homicide" canceled 1999: Pokemon catches fire
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 27, 1999
A CONVENTION of trading card carriers convened on a city street recently, taking both kid and parent beyond frustration to anger and despair. A Pokemon commonplace, it began with proud collectors showing prized acquisitions to friends.They sat on the sidewalk going through their hand-carried archive of cards in ring binders.Not much time passed before one or more of the cards -- the more expensive and rare ones, of course -- went missing. One of the conventioneers was fingered as the likely culprit.
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