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SPORTS
By SAM DAVIS | May 14, 1991
Despite a 10-2 record, Howard High School's boys lacrosse team did not make the state Class 3A-4A playoffs this season. Howard managed to score just 68 points through the state's points system, good for an average of 5.67.The eight 3A-4A team with the highest averages made the playoffs. Howard had the ninth-best average. However, only two of the other eight teams that made the playoffs had more victories than Howard.This raised an old issue."The question is, is it time for Maryland to think about restructuring the playoff system?"
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NEWS
July 8, 2014
Your recent editorial, "The Harris boycott" (July 7) put far too much emphasis on the politics and not enough on what really matters. The Washington, D.C., City Council has just passed the most lenient marijuana decriminalization law in the nation, with a $25 fine that is not only less than the average traffic ticket but involves no point system. Do we really want the capital of our nation and mecca for family tourism to go down this path? The data show that states with lenient decriminalization laws have higher rates of youth use, as reported to the Centers for Disease Control, than those that have stricter decriminalization with higher civil penalties for the first offense, increasing penalties for repeat offenders, and/or requirements for drug education.
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SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
A 15-member committee met Thursday to embark on an eight-month-long study of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association's playoff point system.Announced in the fall edition of the MPSSAA's Scout magazine, the group -- seven of whom are from the Baltimore area -- was chosen during the summer and will work through the season and report its findings in April."The committee formed as a result of a combination of a lot of different questions and concerns regarding the current point system," said committee member Jill Masterman, a specialist in the Baltimore County office of athletics, working with coordinator Ron Belinko.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
A decision was rendered by the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association Board of Governors on Thursday that allows for the implementation of an A Conference football playoff system without adversely affecting the Turkey Bowl — the annual Thanksgiving Day game between Calvert Hall and Loyola. As was the MIAA's original plan, the A Conference will have playoffs for the first time next season. The top four teams in the league — as determined by a point system — will qualify for the postseason.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
A decision was rendered by the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association Board of Governors on Thursday that allows for the implementation of an A Conference football playoff system without adversely affecting the Turkey Bowl — the annual Thanksgiving Day game between Calvert Hall and Loyola. As was the MIAA's original plan, the A Conference will have playoffs for the first time next season. The top four teams in the league — as determined by a point system — will qualify for the postseason.
SPORTS
By Kim Phelan and Kim Phelan,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Seeking a climax to its season and following the lead of NASCAR, the LPGA Tour will adopt a season-long point system, bring the 32 best together in November 2006 and pay a record $1 million to the survivor of what will be dubbed the "Playoffs at the ADT." "Major League Baseball has the World Series and the drama that leads up to it," LPGA commissioner Ty Votaw said. "The NFL has the Super Bowl. NASCAR now has its revised points chase for the championship. Now, the LPGA has the LPGA playoffs."
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | August 15, 1993
Tired of that same old bowling league format? While you're thinking of signing up for fall bowling leagues, consider the match point system of scoring.Match point scoring adds an element of individual competition to team bowling that can make for more interesting team matches.In your traditional bowling league, the team with the most pins for each game wins one point. With another point awarded for total pins for three games, there's a possible four points to be won on a given night.In the match point system, each bowler on a team is paired against a bowler on the other team.
NEWS
October 11, 1991
The state Department of Natural Resources has published an index of the state's 157 largest trees, including 22 champions in Anne ArundelCounty."The Big Tree Champions of Maryland 1990" may be purchased by mail. Send $11.50, including postage and handling, to Big Tree Champions, c/o Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Forestry Division, Tawes State Office Building, Annapolis MD 21041.The trees were chosen under a point system that considers height,girth and crown size.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 19, 1999
The Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association is willing to consider amending its controversial state tournament format as early as this fall.Ned Sparks, MPSSAA executive director, said the 3-year-old open format would be reviewed if member schools "can come up with a plan that's workable for all schools."But a revision cannot be a "reversion to the old point system," said Baltimore County athletics coordinator Ron Belinko, a former MPSSAA president and chairman of a committee assigned to research possibilities.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
Boon or burden? It seems to North Carroll coach Dick Bauerlein that some of the state's most prominent wrestling coaches may have had a change of heart.After two years of promotion, Bauerlein's plan for separate dual-meet state championships, in addition to the 23-year-old state tournament that crowns individual and team champs, begins during late February of the 1993-1994 season.It passed by a 49-0 margin in last month's state association Board of Control meeting, and last Monday got the approval of the state's superintendents.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | June 10, 2007
Call them the Buddy Regs. What else do you give to the man who has everything because he takes what he wants? Thanks to the fish-stealing antics of charter boat Capt. Buddy Harrison last summer - and the slap on the wrist he received as punishment - fired-up fishermen and fisheries officials agreed to revise Maryland's penalty system. The proposed changes will be unveiled Tuesday night at the Department of Natural Resources' Annapolis headquarters. They are the product of more than six months of work by recreational anglers, watermen and charter boat captains.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | May 19, 2007
A key provision of a Senate compromise for sweeping immigration reform would pit educated workers and foreigners with wealth against those with fewer skills, advocates for immigrants warned yesterday. The plan would replace a backlogged system in which employers and family members sponsor immigrants with a complex merit system, giving preference to advanced-degree holders and proficient English speakers. "For so long, the far right has been saying that they are upset that there are people who are trying to come here legally and have to wait so long," said Kim Propeack, director of advocacy and organizing at immigrant advocacy group CASA of Maryland.
SPORTS
By Kim Phelan and Kim Phelan,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Seeking a climax to its season and following the lead of NASCAR, the LPGA Tour will adopt a season-long point system, bring the 32 best together in November 2006 and pay a record $1 million to the survivor of what will be dubbed the "Playoffs at the ADT." "Major League Baseball has the World Series and the drama that leads up to it," LPGA commissioner Ty Votaw said. "The NFL has the Super Bowl. NASCAR now has its revised points chase for the championship. Now, the LPGA has the LPGA playoffs."
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
A performance evaluation system launched by the Baltimore Police Department with transfers of the 27 lowest-rated patrol officers is under fire from critics, who view it as a quota system that could lead to civil rights violations by emphasizing arrests. The criticism - from a city councilman and the police union - escalated yesterday with disclosure by the union president that a Northern District lieutenant also had instituted his own unique program giving scores to his officers for performance ranging from one point per traffic citation to 10 for a gun arrest.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2004
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- NASCAR officials attempted to walk a tightrope yesterday as they unveiled their plan to overhaul the championship points system for the Nextel Cup Series, formerly the Winston Cup Series. NASCAR president Mike Helton eased his way into the announcement, saying the organization wanted to continue its tradition of having a points system based on consistency. "We're not changing much," he said. "We're adding five points to a race winner's point total." And then he dropped the bombshell, saying the first 26 races of the season would be used, more or less, as qualifying events for the last 10 races of the season.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2003
Trainer Dale Capuano won another title at the Timonium meeting that concluded yesterday, then disagreed with the new method that determines the winner. Under a system installed for this year, a winner yields five points to a trainer, a runner-up three, a third place two and a fourth place one. Previously, the championship was determined by wins alone. "I was surprised they made the change," said Capuano, who had been the leading conditioner in Maryland five times in the past six years.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | April 3, 1991
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Mike Flanagan's addition to the roster yesterday was expected -- but hardly routine.Because the lefthander had come to camp without a prearranged agreement, the two sides had to agree on a contract. "A lot of room was left for negotiation," said Flanagan, whose bargaining position was increased significantly by his spring training performance.The Orioles couldn't afford to wait any longer because, without a contract to file with the league office, Flanagan was free to negotiate with any other team, many of whom would have signed him after getting a spring scouting report.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | May 19, 2007
A key provision of a Senate compromise for sweeping immigration reform would pit educated workers and foreigners with wealth against those with fewer skills, advocates for immigrants warned yesterday. The plan would replace a backlogged system in which employers and family members sponsor immigrants with a complex merit system, giving preference to advanced-degree holders and proficient English speakers. "For so long, the far right has been saying that they are upset that there are people who are trying to come here legally and have to wait so long," said Kim Propeack, director of advocacy and organizing at immigrant advocacy group CASA of Maryland.
NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | June 24, 2003
Yesterday's Supreme Court rulings on admissions practices at the University of Michigan produced reactions as mixed as the opinions, but this much was agreed on: Racial preferences in higher education have survived their toughest challenge in years. At campuses in Maryland and around the country, college officials said the two rulings would allow them to leave intact policies that take race into account as a factor in their schools' admissions decisions. "We've been wondering why the weather's been so cold: It's because Christmas was coming in June," said Larry S. Gibson, a professor and admissions committee member at the University of Maryland School of Law. "This is the first time the court has unambiguously said affirmative action is constitutional, that diversity is a compelling state interest, and that affirmative action can be used to achieve it."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 2, 2003
YESTERDAY, the Supreme Court heard arguments about whether the University of Michigan's affirmative action program amounts to a quota system for "underrepresented minorities." Much doom and gloom is predicted if the high court rules Michigan's point system is unconstitutional. Here's what Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, speaking in a story by Sun reporter Mike Adams, predicts will happen if you're black, apply to the school and don't get your 20 points: "What we'll see is a resegregation of the most selective institutions of higher education in this country, and I think that would be a terrible tragedy."
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