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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2009
Question: I was told today that the latex sap in Poinsettias can cause a severe allergic reaction. Is that true? Answer: Poinsettia is in the "Euphorbia" family of plants. Many euphorbias are houseplants or outside ornamental plants and have a chemical in their sap which irritates skin or eyes on contact and should not be eaten. Gloves are recommended when pruning them. Happily, poinsettias are an exception. They do not contain the main chemical irritant. Contacting its sap normally causes no effect, though ingesting it could cause vomiting.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
I saved my poinsettia from last year and it grew happily all summer. I put it in a closet two months ago to make it bloom red again for the holidays, but it is turning yellow instead. What should I do? Poinsettias need bright indirect light to survive. Here's how to get them ready for the holidays: Since poinsettias initiate flowers as days get shorter, any additional light from artificial sources will prevent flower development. To get color for the holidays, give plants no more than 10 hours of daylight and then place them in at least 14 hours of darkness each day. This can be done by placing plants under a box or in a closet each evening from 5 p.m. to 7 a.m. for about two months, generally October and November, so they are ready in December.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
I saved my poinsettia from last year and it grew happily all summer. I put it in a closet two months ago to make it bloom red again for the holidays, but it is turning yellow instead. What should I do? Poinsettias need bright indirect light to survive. Here's how to get them ready for the holidays: Since poinsettias initiate flowers as days get shorter, any additional light from artificial sources will prevent flower development. To get color for the holidays, give plants no more than 10 hours of daylight and then place them in at least 14 hours of darkness each day. This can be done by placing plants under a box or in a closet each evening from 5 p.m. to 7 a.m. for about two months, generally October and November, so they are ready in December.
SPORTS
By Gene Wang, The Washington Post | December 22, 2010
After a practice in advance of Thursday's Poinsettia Bowl against San Diego State, Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo told his players how gratifying this season had been, how being associated with Navy football and this team in particular was his privilege and that the health of the program was never more robust than it is currently. Then the discourse turned to the graduating class, and that's when Niumatalolo paused midsentence to collect himself in the emotion of the moment. "I just want to win this game so badly for the seniors," Niumatalolo said as he choked back tears.
FEATURES
December 25, 1994
The theme for the Christmas show at the U.S. Botanic Garden is holiday dreams. The show is open daily through Jan. 8, including Christmas and New Year's Day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The display includes more than 1,000 poinsettias, along with other holiday plants, two large topiary bears and toys. The East Gallery features a model train. Free. The garden is at 100 Maryland Ave. S.W. Call (202) 225-7099.*"Farm Day During the Winter" exposes children ages 6 to 12 to farm life during winter months at the Old Maryland Farm in Upper Marlboro Tuesday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $15 and includes all activities, snacks and lunch cooked over an open fire.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 9, 2007
In a town born just before The Brady Bunch and burdened with Mike Brady-esque split-levels, people hold fast to what traditions and beauty can be had. Which is why some Columbia "pioneers" will arm themselves with poinsettias at high noon today and march on The Mall in Columbia. The shopping center has a new Christmas display this year. Instead of the two-story poinsettia tree that has heralded the season for 30 years, it's "Santastic" - an elaborate Christmas "experience" with hands-on activities, poufs of fake snow and corporate sponsors.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | December 23, 2006
The first time I watered my poinsettias a little black fly flew out. Should I be concerned? Fungus gnats often enter the home on new plants. Their larvae feed on organic material in potting soil, but also feed on roots. To break their life cycle, allow the poinsettias' potting soil to dry to a depth of about 1/2 inch in between waterings. Now that a gnat is loose in your house, follow this rule for all your other houseplants, too, so its eggs cannot hatch in another pot. I found a bag of old flour, and I'm afraid to use it for holiday baking.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
Now that the presents are wrapped and the tree is trimmed, it's time to enjoy some of the pleasures of the season. And there are still many places to find them.At Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., more than 2,000 red, pink and white poinsettias and other Christmas flowers brighten the conservatories. In one area a group of red poinsettias is mirrored in a reflecting pool, and baskets of poinsettias hang from tall tree ferns. In the East Conservatory a topiary Santa in a sleigh pulled by reindeer is suspended over a sea of red cyclamens and white tulips.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2004
What: Holiday Poinsettia Show Where: The Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens. In Druid Hill Park, near McCulloh Street and Gwynns Falls Parkway. When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Sundays through Jan. 2. Why: Because roughly 1,000 poinsettias are on display in the newly renovated conservatory. The plants were grown at the Cylburn Arboretum, and they'll be shown in the conservatory's north and south pavilions. Information: Call 410-396-0008. There is a suggested donation of $2. - Annie Linskey
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
The abundance of new books with a Christmas theme includes several lovely ones by authors and illustrators who already have plenty of fans in the 4-8 age group.* Tomie dePaola, with more than 200 titles to his credit, is best known for "Strega Nona." But "The Legend of the Bluebonnet" and "The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush" have quite a following, and now he has illustrated "The Legend of the Poinsettia" (Putnam, $15.95, 32 pages).In Mr. dePaola's retelling, the star of the story is Lucida, who lives in a mountain village in Mexico.
SPORTS
By Gene Wang, The Washington Post | December 15, 2010
Navy wide receiver Mike Schupp 's recovery from a torn ACL has not progressed as quickly as the senior had hoped, and it's highly unlikely he'll be able to participate in the Poinsettia Bowl on Dec. 23 against San Diego State at Qualcomm Stadium. Schupp was injured in a season-opening loss to Maryland, 17-14, on Sept. 6 when he planted his leg while trying to block. Most frustrating for Schupp was that the injury occurred even though he never made contact with a defender. "I don't know if got caught on the turf or whatnot," Schupp said after practice on Tuesday, the team's first since beating Army on Saturday, 31-17.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
According to legend, a humble bouquet of weeds placed by a little Mexican girl at the foot of a nativity scene miraculously burst into brilliant red flowers, and from that moment, the poinsettia became the floral symbol of Christmas. Red may be the most popular color of the holiday plant, but thanks to plant-friendly spray paint and plant-friendly glitter, it is not the only color. Not by a long shot. A Ravens fan? You can have your poinsettia in purple and black. An Orioles fan?
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2010
Question: The holidays are over but my poinsettias aren't. Do I have to throw them out? Answer: Not at all. Continue to water them, keeping them in bright but not direct sunlight and a moderately warm, not too hot, room. They should stay perky through winter. You can plant them in the ground when night temperatures stay above 55 degrees and enjoy their red bracts (that we think of as flowers) into the summer. New growth will be green and frost will eventually kill it. If you want to bring your poinsettia into bloom again next winter, cut it back to 3-4 inches and repot in early May. Keep it watered and fertilized through the summer.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2009
Question: I was told today that the latex sap in Poinsettias can cause a severe allergic reaction. Is that true? Answer: Poinsettia is in the "Euphorbia" family of plants. Many euphorbias are houseplants or outside ornamental plants and have a chemical in their sap which irritates skin or eyes on contact and should not be eaten. Gloves are recommended when pruning them. Happily, poinsettias are an exception. They do not contain the main chemical irritant. Contacting its sap normally causes no effect, though ingesting it could cause vomiting.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | December 24, 2008
Joseph Turner's 17-yard touchdown run midway through the fourth quarter gave No. 11 Texas Christian its first lead of the night, which the Horned Frogs preserved for a 17-16 victory over No. 9 and previously undefeated Boise State in the Poinsettia Bowl in San Diego. Boise State (12-1) was trying to finish 13-0 for the second time in three seasons. The Broncos took a 10-0 lead on Ian Johnson's 20-yard touchdown run midway through the first quarter, but their high-scoring offense bogged down against TCU's fast, aggressive defense.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | December 29, 2007
I bought a gorgeous poinsettia at Christmastime in 2001. Its leaves were various shades of pink, rather than the traditional red. The plant survived the following year rather well, but I was disappointed when the leaves remained green throughout the year and the holiday season. I was hoping to see them return to the pink colors they were when I bought the plant. I asked a florist if he knew what I needed to do to get the leaves on my poinsettia to turn their original colors again, and he suggested that I consult you. All colors of poinsettias require specific care and timing for light, darkness, watering and pruning in order for the plants' original display to be re-created.
FEATURES
By Beth Smith and Beth Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 13, 1998
A rose by any other name is still a rose - unless it is 'Winter Rose,' a brand-new poinsettia making its debut this holiday season. It is causing a stir.Unlike a traditional poinsettia, this recently cultivated breed has curly edges that dip and curve inward. It comes in two styles: one bloom perched atop a tall, single stem; or several blooms clustered among the wavy-edged leaves of a multi-branched plant.At Hillcrest Nursery in Millers, Jim and Steve Hershfeld nurtured 200 'Winter Rose' cuttings from the Paul Ecke Ranch in Encinitas, Calif.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | December 13, 2006
The 70,000-square-foot glass greenhouse is mostly empty at Greenstreet Growers Inc. Only two weeks ago, red, white and mauve poinsettias lined row after row of tables. By the end of this week, 90 percent of the 30,000 plants will be gone, sent to retail nurseries across the region. As trucks rolled out along the Lothian farm's gravel roads Monday, workers continued to put the finishing touches on the blooming plants, sprinkling gold glitter to gild red petals, known as bracts, and spraying a blue "frost" or purple stripes on white poinsettias.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | December 20, 2007
Vernadetta Rawls' voice comes over the telephone line from Anchorage, Alaska, deep-throated and full of enthusiasm. She has been asked about her nephew, Zerbin Singleton, the Naval Academy's senior slotback, whom she helped raise and whose young life could be the material of one of those Family Channel inspirational movies. "He's always been an amazing kid," Rawls said. "He started walking at 6 or 7 months, and he could understand what you said to him, too. He came into the world stubborn and determined."
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