Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPoetry
IN THE NEWS

Poetry

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Childs Walker | February 28, 2010
Nine Maryland high school students gathered Saturday at the Enoch Pratt Free Library to compete for the state championship in the national Poetry Out Loud competition. The students recited memorized selections by Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Frost, Alfred, Lord Tennyson and other giants. They clenched their fists and clutched their hearts to accentuate dramatic passages. Competitors were judged on presence, articulation, understanding of the poem and the difficulty of their selections. The winner, Nora Sand- ler, a senior at Richard Montgomery High School in Rockville, received a $200 prize and advanced to the national finals in Washington at the end of April.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
It's hard to imagine what the snarling football coaches of yesteryear — think Bear Bryant or Woody Hayes — would have made of the poetry on the helmet and sleeves of the uniforms the University of Maryland played in Saturday. But the Under Armour designers of Maryland's "Star-Spangled" uniforms, which highlight the Francis Scott Key poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" in cursive, would like to think that the old-school coaches might have approved. The uniforms, which the Terrapins wore in Saturday's home loss to West Virginia, were intended to promote the team and inspire players and fans.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
Despite the title "Earth and Sky," audiences will not see a nature study during Colonial Players' current production of Douglas Post's 1989 drama. Instead, they can expect to find a fast-paced murder mystery that transforms CP's in-the-round theater space into a poetic film-noir setting. Post has created a poet heroine devoted to the works of Welsh poet Dylan Thomas, whose poem, "This Side of Truth," provides the play's title. His poetry consoles the heroine when she is in doubt: "They are only dead who did not love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
"I don't know, sister, what I'm saying, nor do no man, if he don't be praying. I know that love is the only answer and the tight-rope lover the only dancer. … - From the poem " Some Days (for Paula)" by James Baldwin The tightrope lover was 40 years old in 1983 when Baldwin published a book containing this prescient verse. The author hoped that "Some Days" would help his younger sister steady her nerves and find her footing as she inched along the thin path to safety.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | April 29, 2013
This episode includes poetry and haggis. Actually, poetry and haggis together! A little haggis always makes the poetry go down easier, don't you think? Let's kick things off with ... Airport Shenanigans of Mistaken Euphoria You know that feeling you get when you get the last tickets to Scotland on an earlier flight, and your least favorite teams are stuck on a flight three hours later? You do a little dance, skip around, maybe plan to do some sightseeing with all that free time you'll be enjoying?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield's restless and moving "Putty Hill" is about a pocket of working-class Baltimoreans reacting to the overdose death of a 24-year-old man. It finds seductive underlying forms in what outsiders might consider shapeless lives. When skateboarders and BMXers streak up and down and over a course of concrete dips and valleys, and a teenager tags a wall with a spray-paint baroque version of "Rest in peace, Cody," they prove that they have poetry in them. The director doesn't impose his poetry on them.
NEWS
By DANIEL MARK EPSTEIN | September 7, 1994
When I came to live in Baltimore in 1971 I did not know any of the writers in the city. But one writer soon became known to me, as I introduced myself to strangers in the old Peabody Book Store and O'Henry's Bar, telling people I was a poet. As soon as I called myself a poet I would get a reflex response that was inevitable no matter whom I talked to.''Do you know Joe Cardarelli?''I did not know Joe Cardarelli, but after hearing his name two or tTC three times it began to ring a bell. I had seen his poems in a popular anthology called ''Quickly Aging Here,'' a book by writers who were in their 20s in the late 60s. Now the title resonates with irony.
NEWS
By David Beaudouin and David Beaudouin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 1998
Gertrude Stein, seminal Baltimore poet and post-modern counterweight to this town's Poeish ways, once measured Charm City so: " ... Nothing really can stop any one living and feeling as they do in Baltimore." In doing so, Stein distinctively framed that maverick streak in Baltimore's literary arts which even today blooms as unexpectedly as Bradford pears up Charles Street.Certainly generations of these poetic "culture workers" (a term popularized by the late and much admired Baltimore poet Joe Cardarelli)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew M. McDermott and Matthew M. McDermott,Special to the Sun | March 26, 2000
Just below the surface of awareness in the city of Baltimore, words and emotions coalesce into something quite remarkable: the local poetry scene. Its merit is often discounted in a town whose poetic identity seems to lie within the first three letters of the word "poetry" itself. But there is life after Poe. Who is emerging as Poetry Month 2000 begins? Octogenarian Chester Wickwire's refreshing first-collection of poems, "Longs Peak" (Brickhouse Books, 78 pages, $10), exudes a virility that betrays any misconceptions that stagnation comes with age. This is not the pull-my-finger grandpappy poetry that beckons back to Thanksgiving lap rides and embellished fishing stories of summers past.
NEWS
January 20, 1993
Maya Angelou's presence at Bill Clinton's inauguration today marks the first time a poet has participated in a presidential swearing-in ceremony since Robert Frost appeared at the inauguration of John F. Kennedy in 1961.The nation has come a long way in the interim, and Mr. Clinton's choice of Ms. Angelou is a fitting reminder of the vast social and demographic changes that have transformed America over the past three decades.Mr. Frost's was the voice of a Norman Rockwell America of New England small towns and farms, a place where family values and hard work were taken-for-granted emblems of the national purpose and civic virtue.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Allen Grossman,a prize-winning poet who spent 15 years teaching his craft to students at the Johns Hopkins University, died June 27 at his home in Chelsea, Mass. He was 82 and had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease. "Allen was an inimitable instructor," said Douglas Basford, assistant director of composition at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and a former student of Dr. Grossman's at Hopkins. Remembering a class he audited in poetry and poetics, Mr. Basford recalled the instructor "probing and prodding to get, as he did in his critical prose, to the core of how a poem worked [and]
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  TERPSICHOREAN Though many evangelical Christians have been leery of dancing, the Greeks held it in high esteem, numbering dance as one of the gifts of the Muses, along with epic poetry, lyric poetry, erotic poetry, sacred poetry, history, comedy, tragedy, and astronomy. Each was anthropomorphized, and Terpsichore was personified as the muse of dance.  From her name we derive the adjective terpsichorean  (pronounced terp-SIK-uh-ree-an)
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 2, 2014
I was listening to a local radio news program when I heard the anchor say that Dr. Maya Angelou had passed. To make sure the report was accurate, I called a friend, who knows her through a close friendship with Angelou's grandson. She confirmed what I was hoping was not true. The world had lost an icon in the passing of Angelou at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C. She was 86 years old. Through her autobiographies, poems, essays, lectures and work in front of and behind the camera, as well as on stage, Angelou touched generations - my mom's, mine, my nieces' and nephews' generation and their children's.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Gayle Danley called the Wilde Lake Middle School eighth-graders "poets," a label that sounded hip and eclectic and, by the tone of her fiery prose, non-negotiable. After introducing them to the world of "poetry slam" - competitions involving artists who recite their original works - the former national and international slam champion sought a way last week to bring out the teens' inner muses. "Pick up the pencils and write the words: 'You can't do that to me!'" commanded Danley, a Baltimore resident and artist-in-residence who visits middle schools through Baltimore and Washington, teaching students to use poetry to express themselves about the more pressing issues in their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
At the 11th hour on Nov. 11, 1918, "the monstrous anger of the guns" and "the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle" - to quote two of poet Wilfred Owen's indelible phrases - finally subsided. The First World War, the one to end all wars, was over. The silence probably would not have impressed Owen, a lieutenant in the British army. He had already written about the way soldiers "walked quite friendly up to Death" and "laughed, knowing that better men would come, and greater wars. " The poet, killed by a sniper a week before the Armistice at the age of 25, left behind a collection of searing verses that would become integral to Benjamin Britten's "War Requiem," a 1962 score that combines Owen's words with the text of the Latin Mass for the Dead.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 8, 2013
For poet Moira Egan, a few sleepless hours before dawn were no longer a chance to write in peace and solitude. There were too many of them during too many nights. Her poetic personality was always "mood-swingy. " But things were getting wild, and her husband asked if she was OK. Well, she was and she wasn't. She was 50 and lucky enough to still be alive to experience the unpleasantness of menopause. "Since I am a poet, the least I could do is write a bunch of poems about it," said Ms. Egan, who grew up in Baltimore, the child of poet Michael Egan, and taught here for a while.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Contributing Writer | February 1, 1993
According to Julia Randall, "There is no excuse for poetry, unless there is an excuse for being." Introducing the first full-length collection of her poems, "The Puritan Carpenter" (1965), Ms. Randall goes on to say that she believes there is an excuse for poetry.It is in the act of creating, she says, of "making new."Ms. Randall, who was born in Baltimore and received her master of arts degree from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars, has published widely. She has won numerous awards, including the Shelley Award and the first Poet's Prize for "Moving in Memory," her sixth book of poems.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
A family vacation, a fleeting sensual moment, reading with a daughter on the couch: This is the stuff of daydreams - and the stuff of Michael S. Glaser's poems. He always has sought to share these poems, and those of others, with as many people as possible. Since he came to St. Mary's College of Maryland as a professor of English in 1970, Glaser has been a champion of poetry in the classroom, at the bi-annual literary festival he founded, and at readings around the state for audiences of all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | April 29, 2013
This episode includes poetry and haggis. Actually, poetry and haggis together! A little haggis always makes the poetry go down easier, don't you think? Let's kick things off with ... Airport Shenanigans of Mistaken Euphoria You know that feeling you get when you get the last tickets to Scotland on an earlier flight, and your least favorite teams are stuck on a flight three hours later? You do a little dance, skip around, maybe plan to do some sightseeing with all that free time you'll be enjoying?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Margaret C. Doyle, a retired public school English teacher and poet who later taught for many years at the Renaissance Institute, died Thursday from complications following surgery at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The former longtime Pikesville resident was 85. "Margaret was a magnificent woman. She was brilliant and loving," said Jim Holechek, a retired Baltimore public relations executive and author. "Her husband was an artist and she was a poet, and it was always wonderful to interface with her. She was a very sensitive person and able to express herself very well.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.