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Poetic Justice

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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Rick Bowlus comes by his love of football honestly. But becoming a big-time Ravens fan — that wasn't so easy. Bowlus, who goes by the name "Poetic Justice" on Ravens game days, grew up in Ohio a devoted Browns fan. And he maintained that allegiance even after moving to Maryland in 1970 and becoming a science teacher and assistant basketball coach at Bel Air High School. Unlike the vast majority of his fellow Browns fans, whose allegiance didn't follow when the team headed to Baltimore, Bowlus became a proud Ravens fanatic.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Rick Bowlus comes by his love of football honestly. But becoming a big-time Ravens fan — that wasn't so easy. Bowlus, who goes by the name "Poetic Justice" on Ravens game days, grew up in Ohio a devoted Browns fan. And he maintained that allegiance even after moving to Maryland in 1970 and becoming a science teacher and assistant basketball coach at Bel Air High School. Unlike the vast majority of his fellow Browns fans, whose allegiance didn't follow when the team headed to Baltimore, Bowlus became a proud Ravens fanatic.
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By Los Angeles Daily News | July 27, 1993
"Poetic Justice" was the nation's top weekend box-office draw, despite being barred from opening at the 18-screen Universal City Cinema in Los Angeles, the country's largest-grossing movie complex.Projected weekend receipts for the film, a romance written and directed by Oscar-nominated John Singleton and starring singer Janet Jackson and rapper Tupac Shakur, were $12.1 million.The decision not to show the film at Universal complex adjacent to the new Universal CityWalk shopping and dining promenade has been condemned as discriminatory by Los Angeles politicians and civil-rights leaders.
NEWS
From The Aegis | April 11, 2012
The Bel Air Kiwanis Club held its first Decoy Dunk March 3 at Flying Point Park in Edgewood. In all, 40 dunkers and at least 100 spectators participated. The water felt a little chilly but the air temperature was a warm 60 degrees. The event raised approximately $3,000 for the Boys & Girls Clubs and other charitable organizations in Harford County. The dunkers were individuals and teams, from young to old and all excited about raising funds for great causes. Organizers said the day could not have been a success without the help of Harford County Parks and Recreation, WAMD Radio Station, Abingdon Fire Company, Patterson Mill High School Key Club and Conway Management (and especially Carl Conway)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 23, 1993
Poetry hasn't been celebrated in an American movie since 1966's "A Fine Madness," where Sean Connery played a goatish versifier spilling his seed and his lyrics up and down the East Coast with equal abandon. It earned him a lobotomy. The poetry in "Poetic Justice" isn't as erotic or dangerous, but it's lovely nonetheless, coming originally from Maya Angelou.And the movie loves poetry. It stops and lets Angelou, through the vessel of a vibrant Janet Jackson playing a Los Angeles hairdresser with a great well of hidden talent, do exactly what a poet does: define a mood.
BUSINESS
By Mary Moore and Mary Moore,Special to The Sun | December 27, 2007
Joseph Galli Jr. swears he does not "wake up in the morning, thinking I have to kill Black & Decker." But he does call it "poetic justice" that he is about to be in a position to at least inflict injury. Nearly nine years after being fired as head of Black & Decker's power tools division, Galli is expected to be named CEO of the Towson toolmaker's largest competitor, Techtronic Industries Co. Ltd., in early January, according to TTI sources. Galli, who still lives in Baltimore, has been out of the tool business since leaving Black & Decker and was forbidden by a clause in his contract with a subsequent employer from working in the industry for much of that time.
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From The Aegis | April 11, 2012
The Bel Air Kiwanis Club held its first Decoy Dunk March 3 at Flying Point Park in Edgewood. In all, 40 dunkers and at least 100 spectators participated. The water felt a little chilly but the air temperature was a warm 60 degrees. The event raised approximately $3,000 for the Boys & Girls Clubs and other charitable organizations in Harford County. The dunkers were individuals and teams, from young to old and all excited about raising funds for great causes. Organizers said the day could not have been a success without the help of Harford County Parks and Recreation, WAMD Radio Station, Abingdon Fire Company, Patterson Mill High School Key Club and Conway Management (and especially Carl Conway)
FEATURES
By Iain Blair and Iain Blair,Entertainment News Service | July 11, 1993
It's a long, long way from the mean streets of South Central Los Angeles to a plush office in the Capra Building of Sony Studios. But when you enter the headquarters of John Singleton's New Deal Productions, it's quickly apparent that the 25-year-old Wunderkind writer-director hasn't forgotten his roots.While the hushed corridors outside are swarming with suits, inside Mr. Singleton is kicking back in a T-shirt and jeans as he pumps up the hip-hop soundtrack and watches a trailer for his eagerly anticipated new film, "Poetic Justice" (which opens July 23)
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By Esther Iverem and Esther Iverem,Newsday | August 6, 1993
Watch Tupac Shakur -- gangster rapper, son of a Black Panther, rage-filled young man -- break.Watch as his heart breaks in John Singleton's new film "Poetic Justice," in which he plays Lucky, a young postal carrier in South-Central Los Angeles. See the honest, good-hearted laborer who has no concern over his dirty fingernails. So &L emotionally vulnerable that he once fell for a hooker. Hanging by a thread so thin a cousin's death causes it to snap and his eyes to spill over with tears.Watch Tupac Shakur (pronounced Toopok Shakoor)
NEWS
June 22, 2005
IT'S A FORM of poetic justice that Edgar Ray Killen was convicted of manslaughter on the 41st anniversary of the deaths of three civil rights workers in Neshoba County, Miss. That it took the state four decades to seek justice of any kind against Mr. Killen or any of the other alleged Ku Klux Klansmen long known or thought to have been responsible for the killings shows the depth of the racial chasm in Mississippi. But the fact that, however belatedly, the state brought charges and a jury of nine whites and three blacks has found the 80-year-old ailing former preacher culpable in the murders also points to progress made in bridging the divide and the need to continue the process of reconciliation and healing - not only in Mississippi, but across the nation.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | February 13, 2008
To punctuate her point during a high school debate competition that gangsta rap has no place in society, Denaya Barnes ended her oral argument with - what else - a rap: I propose that hip-hop has the struggle And you fake MCs need to be muzzled Thanks to your representation Hip-hop needs an emancipation The lyrics were part of a longer rap that Barnes, a 17-year-old City College student, unleashed on her opponents - two other city public high school...
BUSINESS
By Mary Moore and Mary Moore,Special to The Sun | December 27, 2007
Joseph Galli Jr. swears he does not "wake up in the morning, thinking I have to kill Black & Decker." But he does call it "poetic justice" that he is about to be in a position to at least inflict injury. Nearly nine years after being fired as head of Black & Decker's power tools division, Galli is expected to be named CEO of the Towson toolmaker's largest competitor, Techtronic Industries Co. Ltd., in early January, according to TTI sources. Galli, who still lives in Baltimore, has been out of the tool business since leaving Black & Decker and was forbidden by a clause in his contract with a subsequent employer from working in the industry for much of that time.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
IT'S A FORM of poetic justice that Edgar Ray Killen was convicted of manslaughter on the 41st anniversary of the deaths of three civil rights workers in Neshoba County, Miss. That it took the state four decades to seek justice of any kind against Mr. Killen or any of the other alleged Ku Klux Klansmen long known or thought to have been responsible for the killings shows the depth of the racial chasm in Mississippi. But the fact that, however belatedly, the state brought charges and a jury of nine whites and three blacks has found the 80-year-old ailing former preacher culpable in the murders also points to progress made in bridging the divide and the need to continue the process of reconciliation and healing - not only in Mississippi, but across the nation.
NEWS
By Peter Savodnik | January 4, 2005
KIEV, Ukraine - The revolutionaries who are trying to uproot Ukraine's entrenched government and who electrified democracy movements in Russia, Belarus and Moldova are hardly idealists or faithful lap dogs of their liberal-minded president-elect, Viktor A. Yuschenko. Of course, they have ideals and aspirations. Naturally, they believe their new leader - poisoned, pock-marked, widely regarded as intelligent but not very good on the stump - offers hope and the possibility of something new. Still, theirs is a cordoned-off hope, a democratic notion circumscribed by an ugly memory of post-Soviet Ukraine that prohibits most here from investing too much faith or emotion in any one person or government.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | October 19, 2004
BOSTON - The man in the boot is about to take the mound for the Red Sox. The man in the boot is about to become the most bizarre twist in a long and incredibly twisted tale of the Red Sox's quest to beat the New York Yankees. No chance, right? Fuggetaboutit, right? Deny if you must, but deny at your own risk the plausibility that this implausible scenario is finally the thing that breaks the 86-year logjam for the cursed Red Sox. Take your No Doz. Prepare. Take with a grain of salt what Yankees manager Joe Torre says when he says things are cool.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
Warren A. Brown, Warren A. Brown, the loquacious litigator and City Council hopeful, grabbed air time on 60 Minutes and space in major American newspapers last year in his successful defense of Dontee D. Stokes, the Baltimore man who shot a priest Stokes said had molested him as a teen-ager. Yesterday, Brown requested a temporary move to the other side of the courtroom. In a hyperbolic letter to the city state's attorney's office, Brown asked to help bring sex abuse charges against Maurice J. Blackwell, the priest shot by Stokes in May. While the state's attorney's office and legal scholars deem the move a clear conflict of interest, Brown advocates the unusual legal maneuver on simple grounds: "Poetic justice."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 27, 1994
Irony lovers, TV serves up a major treat today. At the end of this sports-stricken summer, when the only sounds in most major league baseball stadiums (unless they're sharing space with preseason football) are the sounds of silence, ABC is offering up daytime coverage of the 1994 Little League World Series.* "Little League World Series" (3:30 p.m.-conclusion, Channel 13) -- Broadcast live from Williamsport, Pa., this contest has a truer claim to its World Series title than its major-league counterpart: The "Earthquake Kids" of Northridge, Calif.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
Warren A. Brown, Warren A. Brown, the loquacious litigator and City Council hopeful, grabbed air time on 60 Minutes and space in major American newspapers last year in his successful defense of Dontee D. Stokes, the Baltimore man who shot a priest Stokes said had molested him as a teen-ager. Yesterday, Brown requested a temporary move to the other side of the courtroom. In a hyperbolic letter to the city state's attorney's office, Brown asked to help bring sex abuse charges against Maurice J. Blackwell, the priest shot by Stokes in May. While the state's attorney's office and legal scholars deem the move a clear conflict of interest, Brown advocates the unusual legal maneuver on simple grounds: "Poetic justice."
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 2001
WASHINGTON - New York's senators have their limits. They will keep a bet, even read in verse, but they don't do bird imitations. New York Democratic Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Charles E. Schumer made good on their Super Bowl wager with Maryland's senators yesterday afternoon, reciting the 108-line Edgar Allan Poe poem "The Raven" to mark Baltimore's triumph over the Giants. But while an excited Maryland Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski punctuated their performance by repeatedly attempting flight - whipping her arms and bobbing up and down like a raven - Clinton and Schumer stuck to the script and remained decidedly earth-bound.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | September 20, 2000
DAVID GOLD, host of a talk-radio show in Dallas, was genuinely perplexed last week by the press of media attention generated by Indiana University basketball coach Bobby Knight's firing. Gold, a conservative, felt the media should have been covering more important issues - including Vice President Al Gore's pressuring Immigration and Naturalization Services officials to bypass guidelines that allowed immigrant criminals to become citizens. Still, for conservatives, Knight's firing was an important issue.
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