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By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Sometimes they were scrawled on loose-leaf notebook paper. Others were written on the back of police watch sheets or on Baltimore police stationery. But the poems Lawerence E. Mize Sr. brought home show what he was contemplating during long midnight patrol shifts in West Baltimore: how much he loved his wife, Sandy. Now Mize has published these poems and others in a slim volume titled "Thoughts of You: Poems on Life, Love, and Family. " In the introduction to his book, the Southwest Baltimore native describes the first time he ever saw Sandy, who lived across the street, while she was playing badminton with her sister.
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By Ryan Bacic, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
For the first two months of her Western High gym class, special education teacher LaDonna Schemm didn't notice. Then a freshman, the ever-bubbly Joy Keene-El would get out of her wheelchair and do everything thrown her way, from tennis to baseball to swimming. One day, when the physical fitness test came around, she did 61 pushups. But eventually an activity came that Keene-El said she couldn't do. And so an incredulous Schemm asked why not. "Look," Keene-El said, hoisting a pant leg. "I don't have any knees.
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NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
A 41-year-old Ellicott City woman, whose violent slaying prompted a national search for her estranged husband, was an introverted poet who dedicated her life to her children and expected a bright new year without her spouse, friends said.Shirley Scott Harney's fractured and bullet-ridden body was found by police outside her home in the 5000 block of Brampton Parkway Dec. 26.Her husband was in custody last night in Charlotte, N.C. His sons were found unharmed.Neighbors said they knew little about Mrs. Harney.
NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt | May 5, 2014
Timonium resident and poet Ann Kolakowski says that what she discovered when her grandmother turned 99 has haunted her to this day. Now, nearly 12 years later, she has published a book of poetry about that discovery. "When my brothers and I were clearing out our grandmother's home when she moved to an assisted living facility," said Kolakowski, "I found a shabby notebook. I opened it and read, 'Marian Brown, Domestic Science/Warren School, Maryland.' I was really confused. " In fact, the town in which her grandmother, Florence Marian Brown Eichler, had spent her childhood and attended Warren School had been bought, razed and flooded in 1921 to create a municipal water supply.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Keisha Miles' poem "No One Seems to Hear Me" has a long way to go -- at least 4 million miles.Keisha, a seventh-grader at Roland Park Middle School, is one of four young poets whose work has been selected for display inside the Mass Transit Administration's fleet of 850 buses.Through the Poetry Express program, supported by a grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, Keisha can share some of her most private thoughts. "I'm glad people can [see] my poetry and understand the way I think, because I'm really shy and nervous," she says.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 1999
Twelve students from Friendship Valley Elementary School squelched their enthusiasm about graduating from the fifth grade long enough to share their poetry in front of a full house at the Carroll County Arts Council Gallery last night.The pupils opened up "First Thursday," an evening of poetry, music and art sponsored each month at the gallery in Westminster by One Tree Productions and Common Ground on the Hill.Joining the youngsters were Sykesville poet Kathleen Adcock, musician Amy Ferebee and her partner, Steve Snyder.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
Donald Richardson is a man of many roles.Not only is he an English professor at Anne Arundel Community College and a faculty adviser for the college newspaper, he is also a poet in residence for sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders at St. Jane Frances School in Riviera Beach.For the past week, Mr. Richardson, 50, has taught the youngsters different forms and components of poetry -- that it is more than rhyme schemes and haiku. Today, the students will honor the Pasadena resident with a reading of their works.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
Many students read and write poetry in high school, but Pikesville poet Kendra Kopelke wants young people to listen to poetry, as well. "Poems are kind of an odd encounter with words," she said. "To hear them out loud is really different." As the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society's poet-in- residence, Kopelke will read and discuss her poetry in every Howard County High school between October and April. One of her messages is that hearing a poet read his or her work is as valuable as talking about themes, meters and line breaks.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1997
A pizza is a pizza and nothing more, unless one considers it a metaphor. Then, who knows? In the hands of a poet, a pizza -- boxed and resting on the bed of a Motel 6, let's say -- marks a vacant place in the heart. As Baltimore poet Matt Hohner put it:I climb into bed. A warm spotwas left behind by the pizza box where you are not.Hohner was on the road in Oregon that spring of 1995, thinking of his girlfriend. She was back home in Baltimore. Hohner was heading to graduate school at the Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | March 15, 2007
The sun descends behind the mountains. ... The moon floats like a silver boat through the blue lake of heaven. ... My heart is still and awaits its hour. ... " Such imagery of leave-taking, drawn from ancient Chinese poetry, inspired one of the greatest works of Western music, Gustav Mahler's The Song of the Earth (Das Lied von der Erde), for vocal soloists and orchestra. Those particular lines are from The Farewell (Der Abschied), the final movement, which, at more than 30 minutes, takes up half of this piece from 1909.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Around the turn of the 20th century, ancient Chinese poetry grabbed fresh attention in the West and provided inspiration for some notable works. Austrian composer Gustav Mahler, for example, found in a set of German translations of Li Po the impetus to create "Das Lied von der Erde" ("The Song of the Earth"). And four years after the 1911 posthumous premiere of that profound music, American poet Ezra Pound published "Cathay," his influential interpretations of Li Po and other Chinese poets.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Seeing footage of CBS newsman Walter Cronkite, his voice catching as he announces Preisdent John F. Kennedy's death, sends a chill through Diane Scharper, a poet and author who teaches writing at Towson University. "Even now, it brings tears to your eyes," said Scharper, who was a student at the College of Notre Dame when Kennedy was shot in November 1963. She and her advisor, Sister Kathleen Marie Engers, had been in a workroom just off a small theater on campus when they learned the news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Marin Alsop's tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been notable for several things, prominent among them the programming of compositions by Leonard Bernstein, her childhood idol and mentor when she was starting her conducting career in the 1980s. Among the most sizzling performances the BSO has given with Alsop over the years have been those of Bernstein works - the genre-bending "Mass" and two of his three emotionally complex symphonies, No. 1, "Jeremiah," and No. 3, "Kaddish.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 8, 2013
For poet Moira Egan, a few sleepless hours before dawn were no longer a chance to write in peace and solitude. There were too many of them during too many nights. Her poetic personality was always "mood-swingy. " But things were getting wild, and her husband asked if she was OK. Well, she was and she wasn't. She was 50 and lucky enough to still be alive to experience the unpleasantness of menopause. "Since I am a poet, the least I could do is write a bunch of poems about it," said Ms. Egan, who grew up in Baltimore, the child of poet Michael Egan, and taught here for a while.
NEWS
msaarbach1@gmail.com | May 10, 2013
Recently, a poem by Dulaney High School senior Minwei Cao was selected to be included in the "Building Bridges to Celebrate our Global Village" anthology. A student competition to write essays and poems about cultural diversity for the anthology was sponsored by World Artists Experiences, a nonprofit group that promotes worldwide mutual understanding and cross-cultural interaction. The title of Minwei's poem was "Please Do Not Misunderstand. " In it, she writes of the need to strive for a universal language free of hate and prejudice "that will roll off the tongue like water/ smooth and soft/ lovely and peaceful.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Friends and former classmates gathered Saturday at Johns Hopkins University to remember Anne Smedinghoff, a Foreign Service officer who was killed in a bombing in Afghanistan earlier this month, sharing stories of a too-short life marked by adventure. As photographs of Smedinghoff in front of monuments and ruins around the world flashed by on projector screens, friends recalled her various escapades, including a coast-to-coast cycling trip, which saw the young woman eat a live bug to fulfill an item on a scavenger hunt list.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
Almost everyone knows a snippet of Dorothy Parker's tart poetry. Her advice to the lovelorn, for example: "Candy is dandy But liquor is quicker." Or, perhaps ... "Men seldom make passes At girls who wear glasses." Lots of people love the short stories by the brilliant, brittle and erratic Mrs. Parker of the Algonquin Round Table, stories like "The Big Blonde," "A Telephone Call," "Diary of a New York Lady" and a couple dozen more. Lots of her admirers can recite great swaths of her longer poems, such as "Resume."
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | September 2, 2007
Adrianna Amari is a pianist, photographer, psychologist, peacenik and poet. Now, the faculty member with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has assembled a book of poetry by Daniel Berrigan, the longtime antiwar activist who was convicted of burning draft records in the celebrated "Catonsville Nine" case. She placed the highly evocative poems side-by-side with dozens of haunting photographs of cemeteries that she had taken during the decade before she lost her vision as a result of an aneurysm.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 20, 2012
A new book celebrates the career of former Maryland poet laureate Lucille Clifton , including her thoughts on topics from Sunday dinner to cancer, her hips to racism. In the Baltimore Sun, Mary McCauley highlights “The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton, 1965-2010,” which includes a foreword by Toni Morrison. McCauley offers a Q&A with poet Michael Glaser, who co-edited the book with Kevin Young, curator of the Emory University archives where Clifton's papers are held.
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