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NEWS
By Michael Madden | January 26, 2011
Yes, Virginia, there is a Poe Toaster. Now that smoke from the supposed failure of the Poe Toaster to materialize on Jan. 19 has cleared, it is time to consider the fundamental question: Did the Poe Toaster appear, or not? I was among the crowd gathered outside the graveyard at Baltimore's Westminster Hall, hoping for a glimpse of the Poe Toaster — the mysterious visitor who, since 1949, had crept unnoticed into the ancient graveyard on that date, leaving cognac and flowers on the grave of Edgar Allan Poe. The conditions could not have been in better harmony with the event, the wet streets reflecting the dull yellow glare of the streetlights and bathing the entire scene in a Victorian, gas-lit hue. The crowd, however, was solemn — subdued not by the rain or the cold but by the Toaster's unexplained failure to appear the previous year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Bruce Nelson, a longtime Baltimore favorite on the stage, goes macabre for his latest role - the title literary giant in "The Completely Fictional - Utterly True - Final Strange Tale of Edgar Allan Poe. " We'll give you a break after reading that. Still with us? The play, running now through Nov. 25 at Center Stage , focuses on Poe's weird (of course) final days before his mysterious death (again, of course) in Baltimore. And since he's playing the rascally Poe, we had some rascally questions of our own. Thankfully, he brought up Poe marrying his teenage cousin on his own. 1. The title of this play is very intriguing and a bit confusing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A longtime tribute to Edgar Allan Poe may have come to an end with the absence of the "Poe Toaster," who for more than half a century has marked the poet's birthday by laying roses and a bottle of cognac at his original grave site. This is the first time since Jan. 19, 1949 that the person, whose identity is unknown, failed to arrive, said Jeff Jerome, curator of the Edgar Allan Poe House. "I was very annoyed," he said. "I've been doing this since 1977, and there was no indication he wasn't going to show up," Jerome said.
NEWS
January 28, 2012
Could it be that the mysterious visitor to the Edgar Allan Poe grave through the years ("Poe's birthday party loses a famous guest," Jan. 20) was none other than the late Morris Martick, the Baltimore restaurateur who passed away in December? Think about it — ever more! Sam Quigg, Fells Point
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Even in a city defiantly proud of its quirks, the Poe Toaster stood out. Every year for more than half a century, in the early-morning hours of Jan. 19, a mysterious figure would quietly leave three roses and a half-emptied bottle of cognac on the grave of Edgar Allan Poe — a birthday tribute to a towering literary figure. But early Thursday morning, for the third year on a row, the Poe Toaster was a no-show, signaling an end to one of the city's most enduring — and most mysterious — traditions.
FEATURES
b | January 19, 2012
Is one of Baltimore's quirkiest traditions -- the Poe toaster -- dead? In the dark of night, on Jan. 19, the author's birthday, a mysterious, anonymous toaster had for years left cognac and roses at his grave outside Westminster Hall. Now that the stranger has failed to show up -- for the third straight year -- some are declaring an end to the tradition. Here are a few graphs from a story by The Baltimore Sun's Chris Kaltenbach writes: Early Thursday morning, a tired Jeff Jerome, curator of the city's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, "officially" pronounced the Poe-toasting tradition over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach | January 20, 2010
Talk about a midnight dreary. Dozens of fans of Edgar Allan Poe were left standing out in the cold Tuesday when a mysterious nocturnal visitor didn't keep his standing date to toast the author at his Baltimore burial plot. The so-called Poe Toaster's absence yesterday for the first time in more than 60 years has renewed the decades-long fascination with the visitor's identity. It's also an ominous indication that a beloved local ritual, a cherished example of Baltimore quirkiness, might be coming to an end - a possibility that the poet's partisans hurry to deny.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
Taciturn yet opinionated, a mysterious man in black visited the gravesite of Edgar Allan Poe in yesterday's pre-dawn darkness and left a note to accompany his usual tribute of cognac and three roses to mark the author's birth nearly 200 years ago. "The sacred memory of Poe and his final resting place is no place for French cognac," the note read. "With great reluctance but for respect for family tradition the cognac is" placed at the grave. "The memory of Poe shall live evermore!" the note concluded.
NEWS
January 21, 2010
Regarding the article "The man who wasn't there: 'Poe Toaster' fails to show at gravesite" (Jan. 20): The only mystery here is how it could have taken the Toaster so long to figure out that it would be more appropriate to leave birthday gifts for Edgar Allan Poe in Boston where he was born than in Baltimore where he died! Rumor here has it that over the past 48 hours the Toaster, sporting a Red Sox cap and whistling "Yankee Doodle," has been spotted walking between 62 Charles Street South and Edgar Allan Poe Square, searching for the perfect place to leave his cognac and roses.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2001
In a moonlight gesture likely to send Edgar Allan Poe spinning in his grave, a stranger in black marked the writer's birthday yesterday by leaving red roses and a half bottle of cognac on his Westminster burial plot - along with wishes most foul for the Baltimore Ravens. "A Thousand injuries they will suffer," the mysterious figure wrote of the Ravens, who are named for Poe's best-known poem. He went on to extol the supposed superiority of Super Bowl rival New York Giants, known to their fans as "Big Blue."
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Mr. Poe, the microphone is yours. A group of selected mediums and psychics will be spending a March weekend trying to reach Edgar Allan Poe, the literary giant and creator of the modern detective story who has made Baltimore his permanent home since 1849. Officials and friends of Baltimore's Poe House and Museum are organizing what is billed as "Beyond Nevermore. " For two days, on March 3 and 4, psychics will gather at Westminster Hall, a former church just yards from Poe's grave, and try to contact the spirit of the dead author.
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Even in a city defiantly proud of its quirks, the Poe Toaster stood out. Every year for more than half a century, in the early-morning hours of Jan. 19, a mysterious figure would quietly leave three roses and a half-emptied bottle of cognac on the grave of Edgar Allan Poe — a birthday tribute to a towering literary figure. But early Thursday morning, for the third year on a row, the Poe Toaster was a no-show, signaling an end to one of the city's most enduring — and most mysterious — traditions.
FEATURES
b | January 19, 2012
Is one of Baltimore's quirkiest traditions -- the Poe toaster -- dead? In the dark of night, on Jan. 19, the author's birthday, a mysterious, anonymous toaster had for years left cognac and roses at his grave outside Westminster Hall. Now that the stranger has failed to show up -- for the third straight year -- some are declaring an end to the tradition. Here are a few graphs from a story by The Baltimore Sun's Chris Kaltenbach writes: Early Thursday morning, a tired Jeff Jerome, curator of the city's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, "officially" pronounced the Poe-toasting tradition over.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Baltimore schoolkids collected pennies nearly 150 years ago to save Edgar Allan Poe the indignity of lying in an unmarked grave. Now another "Pennies for Poe" campaign is under way, this time with the intention of sparing his North Amity Street house from closure. Which brings us to the fishbowl on the counter at G&A Restaurant on Eastern Avenue, not far from the grill where Coney Island hot dogs sizzle. How does Baltimore's literary giant get mixed up with a Highlandtown diner?
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
PETA and Poe? Oh, woe. The always outrageous People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals made the always financially strapped Edgar Allan Poe House an offer last week that, apparently, the latter can refuse. PETA officials pledged an unspecified amount of money to help keep the Poe House open now that it's lost funding from Baltimore City and is subsisting on the kindness of strangers. The catch, though, is that the house would have to display a PETA poster, one that plays off a famous Poe short story: "The Tell-Tale Heart of a Meat-Eater," goes the ad, which features a drawing of a rather distressed Poe-like man clutching his chest.
NEWS
By Michael Madden | January 26, 2011
Yes, Virginia, there is a Poe Toaster. Now that smoke from the supposed failure of the Poe Toaster to materialize on Jan. 19 has cleared, it is time to consider the fundamental question: Did the Poe Toaster appear, or not? I was among the crowd gathered outside the graveyard at Baltimore's Westminster Hall, hoping for a glimpse of the Poe Toaster — the mysterious visitor who, since 1949, had crept unnoticed into the ancient graveyard on that date, leaving cognac and flowers on the grave of Edgar Allan Poe. The conditions could not have been in better harmony with the event, the wet streets reflecting the dull yellow glare of the streetlights and bathing the entire scene in a Victorian, gas-lit hue. The crowd, however, was solemn — subdued not by the rain or the cold but by the Toaster's unexplained failure to appear the previous year.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2000
CAROL MAID, reading resource teacher at George Fox Middle School, was among the witnesses early Wednesday to an eerie annual graveside ritual marking the birthday of Edgar Allan Poe. She served as one of the observers who watch for the Poe Toaster -- the mysterious visitor who stops by the grave near the western edge of downtown Baltimore every Jan. 19, leaving a half-bottle of cognac and three roses. Jeff Jerome, curator of the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, has been overseeing the ritual since 1977 while trying to protect the privacy of the mystery visitor.
NEWS
November 11, 2004
NATIONAL Gonzales to replace Ashcroft President Bush yesterday nominated his trusted White House counsel Alberto Gonzales to serve as attorney general in the second term, turning to a can-do loyalist and architect of the contentious legal war on terrorism to fill the nation's top law enforcement post. [Page 1a] Vitamin E may be bad for health People who take high doses of vitamin E to improve their health may actually be hastening their deaths, according to a new study. [Page 3a] Peterson juror removed The judge in the Scott Peterson murder trial removed the foreman from the jury yesterday, the second time in two days a juror has been sent home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
In the course of 25 years, actor Jeffrey Combs has gone from reviving corpses to serving as a Ferengi agent to embodying possibly the greatest American literary figure of the 19th century. His fans must get whiplash just trying to keep up with this guy. "I'm just a squirrel trying to keep the engine going here," says Combs, who will be bringing his one-man play "Nevermore" to this weekend's 201st birthday celebration for Edgar Allan Poe. "Running on the wheel, that's all you're doing.
NEWS
January 21, 2010
Regarding the article "The man who wasn't there: 'Poe Toaster' fails to show at gravesite" (Jan. 20): The only mystery here is how it could have taken the Toaster so long to figure out that it would be more appropriate to leave birthday gifts for Edgar Allan Poe in Boston where he was born than in Baltimore where he died! Rumor here has it that over the past 48 hours the Toaster, sporting a Red Sox cap and whistling "Yankee Doodle," has been spotted walking between 62 Charles Street South and Edgar Allan Poe Square, searching for the perfect place to leave his cognac and roses.
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