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By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | December 17, 2005
Peggy McCabe hauled box after box, along with her parents' antique steamer trunk, out of her house in Towson this week. Her belongings were not destined for the garage or a moving truck. She put them in a "pod." "It's just exactly what we needed at this point," McCabe said of the big white box at the top of her driveway. She was clearing the way for her first-floor ceiling to be repaired. The storage units, often used by people preparing to move, have popped up more and more on streets and driveways in the past two years.
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February 20, 2013
An article in the Feb. 22, 1913, edition of The Argus the return of an unwanted visitor. The dog poisoner who has been causing considerable alarm among the owners of valuable canines in Catonsville for some time is again at work. The pretty collie dog of Patrolman August Peters , living on Mellor avenue, was found Thursday morning the victim of poison in her master's yard. The dog was considered the prettiest of its kind in this part of Baltimore county. ***** After keeping their wedding a secret for eight months, Miss Ethel Dykes , of Oella, daughter of James Dykes, and Benjamin Peters , eldest son of Patrolman August Peters , announced to their friends several days ago their wedding which took place in Wilmington, Del., on June 19 last.
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NEWS
September 3, 2000
Mexican sweet chocolate is a blend of ground cocoa nibs (the seeds of cocoa pods), raw (unrefined) sugar, and cinnamon. It should not be confused with "instant" drink mixes, cocoa powder or milk chocolate. Molded into small cakes, it is available at many supermarkets specializing in Mexican foods. Store dried polenta in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. Use within 6 months of purchase. Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
An unlikely scene unfolds daily at City Neighbors High School in Baltimore: Students lounge in cheetah-print beanbag chairs reading books, stretch across stained-wood hutch-style desks as they work on assignments and wash dishes at a kitchen sink. The public charter school, which opened this year with an inaugural ninth-grade class of 90 students, has created a "home away from home" as part of its innovative learning environment. "The idea behind this is, 'How do we make it so that every kid who walks in those doors is known, loved and supported academically,' " said Bobbi Macdonald, the school's founder and self-described "relentless shopper" as she gave a tour of the building she feverishly decorated before doors opened to students this year.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | January 11, 1992
Unicorn plantBotanical name: Martynia louisianaPronuciation: mar-TIN-e-ahFamily: Martyniaceae (Marynia)Origin: Delaware to Indiana, south to New MexicoClass: AnnualDisplay period: SummerHeight: 2 feetOne of those plants with an extra bonus, the unicorn plant, or devil's claw, produces some of the most curious pods around. The pods, which are hooked on the end and turn hard and woody when mature, split open when dry to create an image of a bird-like figure with a long curved beak. The pods -- said to last "forever" and the chief reason for growing the plant -- can be crafted into fanciful creatures, or used unaltered as natural ornaments.
NEWS
By Donna Deane and Donna Deane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 31, 2003
If certain flavors sing of the holidays -- nutmeg and cinnamon, ginger and cloves, a dash or two of good bourbon -- cardamom is certainly not on the list. But, dear baker, this is a mistake. Take a chance, just once, with a batch of butter cookies or maybe a dish of ice cream. Cardamom adds a powerfully sweet, somehow magical note to the simplest pastry or dessert. It's deeply, transportingly aromatic; somehow, cardamom seems celebratory. In Scandinavia and Germany, cardamom traditionally is used in cakes and breads and cookies.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 11, 2008
Discussing the behavior of someone as self-destructive as pro golfer John Daly is dicey business. Too snarky and it comes off as cruel. Too preachy and it comes off as too righteous. I'm not sure we'll sound just the right tone here, but Daly's recent weekend is a pretty instructive primer on the guy. Daly started off at a PGA Tour stop in Palm Harbor, Fla., that's in the greater Tampa-St.Pete-Clearwater area. (The tournament is called the PODS Championship, and, boy, I can really get on a riff about these stupid corporate names for golf tournaments - I mean, PODS are portable storage bins where you stuff junk that you should probably throw out, right?
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2005
I have a perennial called butterfly weed with yellow clusters of flowers. When the seed pods break, like native milkweed, lots of floating white "fairies" come out. How can I grow these seeds for more plants next year? Butterfly weed is a favorite of butterflies. This native flower is easy to raise from seed. Seeds need no special treatment before germination. Until planting, store them in a glass jar in a cool, dry area where temperatures don't fluctuate too much. Start the seeds indoors or directly sow them outdoors in the spring or fall.
FEATURES
By Ann Feild and Ann Feild,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1992
On a chilly, winter day, when the house is filled with the opulent odor of baking cardamom bread, it's easy to understand why fierce wars were once waged over spices.Cardamom lends a rich flavor to savory and dessert dishes alike -- it has charisma, if you like. It's an integral part of many Indian curries, and is very popular in Arab countries where it's used in coffee. But here in America, it's not on every cook's spice shelf.Why? Well, perhaps the cost is prohibitive. The first time I encountered cardamom at a food co-op, I thought there had been a pricing error.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Water chestnuts, not the ones you get at a Chinese restaurant, but noxious plants with spiked seed pods that can cut through a flip-flop, have reappeared in Chesapeake Bay tributaries, threatening to choke off the waterways.The plants, believed to have been introduced to the United States from Eurasia in the late 1800s and first seen in the Potomac River in the 1920s, have nearly covered Owens Creek off the Bird River in Baltimore County and Lloyds Creek off the Sassafras River on the Eastern Shore, according to John Surrick, spokesman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
Inside a tiny trailer outside the Fort Avenue Merritt Athletic Club, a 56-year-old chief financial officer stripped, down to a spandex swimsuit. Out of his office uniform — tweed jacket, jeans — Sam Ulan strapped on a blue swimming cap and climbed onto what looked like an arcade space shuttle. If he looked like a trapped polar bear inside the contraption, he was doing it for a good reason. He was getting his body fat measured. "I'm getting on in years and I'm trying to reach an ideal weight to avoid health problems," he said.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | February 24, 2009
So let's say there are two of us and only one iPod. How'd you like to listen to it together, simultaneously, even if we're up to 30 feet apart? Didn't think so. Other than a possible teen bonding ritual, I can't come up with too many share-an-iPod scenarios in which the Aerielle's i2i Stream wireless digital music broadcaster would be worth $120. Too many people, particularly the demographic that Aerielle appears to target, already have an iPod, anyway. For those who don't own an iPod, $120 comes too close to the cost of a new Nano.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | January 20, 2009
Maybe Aussies don't know us as well as they thought. Or else the designers at Cygnett in Richmond, Victoria, outside Melbourne, badly miscalculated the pampered, iPod-loving American consumer. It built an iPod speaker system, the Unison i-XT, with the on-off switch way, way around back at the base of the rear panel - easily located by anyone wearing a coal-miner's helmet with a safety lamp. And the iPod dock? Not built into the speaker, like most speaker docks, but a lonely stand-alone device.
NEWS
January 11, 2009
In recent years, Apple has been a lifeboat for popular music. While sales of CDs plunged, music stores closed and recording companies failed, Apple sold millions of iPod personal music players. The Apple iTunes store became the largest music outlet in the United States, selling countless cuts at 99 cents apiece via the Internet. Now, Apple is ushering in another music revolution that reflects a larger transformation of the music world. Many iPod owners have long been frustrated by their inability to copy iTunes music tracks into formats that can be played on other machines.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 18, 2008
Saying her administration is "leading by example," Mayor Sheila Dixon pushed through a far-reaching policy yesterday banning the city's 13,000 employees from using cell phones, digital music players or other personal electronic devices while driving on city business. The prohibition, which went into effect yesterday but will not be enforced for 30 days, is broader than any of the cell phone bans adopted in 19 states and the District of Columbia because it does not provide exemptions for speaker phones or other hands-free technology, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | August 10, 2008
I recently downsized into an apartment and must now decide how to make the best use of limited space. The bedroom, for example, is doubling as my home office. I store files in a closet and work on an L-shaped desk with a side return where I keep my computer. Can you suggest where to find an attractive desk with more storage space and a convenient surface for my laptop? Would it have to be custom-made? The bedroom has contemporary black-lacquered furniture. The services of a cabinetmaker may be needed to furnish a home office that succeeds visually as well as functionally.
NEWS
October 22, 2007
KISHO KUROKAWA, 73 Architect Kisho Kurokawa, the influential Japanese architect and theorist behind projects including Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Malaysia, a futurist complex penetrated by a rain forest, died Oct. 12 in Tokyo. He was 73. The cause was heart failure, the Associated Press said, quoting a hospital spokeswoman. Mr. Kurokawa was one of the youngest founding members of Japan's Metabolist movement, which advocated an organic, renewable architecture that could evolve through the addition of clip-on modular units.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and By Elinor Klivans,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2003
Every season has its colors. Summer is a color riot of flowers and fruit, fall has its warm yellows and oranges, winter features cozy browns with the occasional blanket of white. But, spring is green, all green. And, the green vegetables of spring range over the full palette. There is the dark green of baby spinach, the soft green of asparagus, the basic green of peas in the pod, snap and snow peas, and the deep, rich forest-green shades of fiddleheads and of ramps, those elusive wild leeks.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | April 30, 2008
Imagine making a fashion statement by eating fresh peas. Although the idea may seem silly today, indulging in little green legumes was all the rage in 17th-century Europe. It was so popular that it sparked commentary from the court of King Louis XIV. In 1696, according to The Penguin Companion to Food by Alan Davidson, Madame de Maintenon, the king's second wife, wrote: "There are some ladies who, having supped, and supped well, take peas at home before going to bed at the risk of an attack of indigestion.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 11, 2008
Discussing the behavior of someone as self-destructive as pro golfer John Daly is dicey business. Too snarky and it comes off as cruel. Too preachy and it comes off as too righteous. I'm not sure we'll sound just the right tone here, but Daly's recent weekend is a pretty instructive primer on the guy. Daly started off at a PGA Tour stop in Palm Harbor, Fla., that's in the greater Tampa-St.Pete-Clearwater area. (The tournament is called the PODS Championship, and, boy, I can really get on a riff about these stupid corporate names for golf tournaments - I mean, PODS are portable storage bins where you stuff junk that you should probably throw out, right?
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