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By DAVID COLKER and DAVID COLKER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 13, 2006
If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? Updated to the digital era, the Zen koan could be: If a word is uttered in a podcast, can it be found by a search engine? The modern quandary, at least, now has an answer. Two online services are using voice recognition technology to translate speech in podcasts - as well as the latest twist on the form, video blogs - into text that can be searched for specific words, names and phrases. Neither of the services - PodZinger and Blinkx - is perfect by any means, mainly because voice recognition is still an inexact art, at best.
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NEWS
November 21, 2013
Red Maryland is much more than a blog and a  Twitter  presence; it is a burgeoning online radio network, the Red Maryland Network, which encompasses online programming six nights a week. The origins of the network trace back to early 2007 when our Greg Kline began the Conservative Refuge Podcast , which ran from 2007 through the launching of the network. Greg had political guests, analysis and bloggers on the show, which discussed various aspects of conservatism.  In 2008, Warren Monks from WAMD radio in Aberdeen began having on various Red Maryland personalities as guests.
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NEWS
By McClatchy Newspapers | December 29, 2008
Although not as plentiful as fitness podcasts, there are many health, medicine and food science shows from which to choose. Here's a sample of them. HEALTH & MEDICINE "NIH Research Radio" nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm: The good: The National Institutes of Health takes the dry results of studies it produces and jazzes them up for a listening audience. It even manages to make pelvic-floor disorders seem interesting. The bad: The segments sometimes can descend into a public service announcement, which is confusing because they run PSAs between stories.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Sara Toth and Luke Lavoie, Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 11, 2013
A prominent Ellicott City blogger and businessman was stabbed to death by his daughter's 19-year-old boyfriend, who plotted with the 14-year-old girl to kill him so the two could run away together, Howard County police said Friday. Dennis Lane, 58, was found before dawn in his Winding Ross Way home. Police charged Jason Anthony Bulmer and Morgan Lane Arnold, both students at Mount Hebron High School, as adults in his killing; they both face conspiracy and murder counts. Both were held without bail, according to online court records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel Rubin and Daniel Rubin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 25, 2004
Get ready, baby, it's The Dawn & Drew Show, podcasting from an 1895 farmhouse in southern Wisconsin. What's today's program? Some talk about a pencil-necked Wal-Marter they call "the Chicken Boy." A visit to the local porn store. And, as always, her confessions of love for former MTV host Adam Curry. It's the digital world meets Wayne's World (literally: They're in Wayne, Wis.), short audio shows from young marrieds with matching tongue piercings, shows that are delivered right to your MP3 player.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
Elizabeth Tracey and Rick Lange are chatting amiably over a microphone in a room that's a far cry from a recording studio. But in 24 hours or so, their conversation will be online for anyone to hear -- just like all the other productions in the do-it-yourself corner of mass communications known as podcasting. Unlike all the other podcasts, though, this one's for Johns Hopkins Medicine. Make room, early adopters. Businesses are finding their way to the latest domain of the high-tech counterculture, and this time it didn't take them long.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | February 20, 2008
healthcastle.com This eye-catching site has eating and shopping tips from registered dietitians, and offers podcasts for the nutrition-conscious to download on the run.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
SPLURGE OF THE WEEK FLAT-OUT LOVELY A Web site for those who love fresh-cut flowers, flower possibilities.com, offers tips on how to decorate with fresh flowers. The site recently launched monthly podcasts -- downloadable video content -- featuring designer Jill Slater presenting flower arranging techniques and other projects. The Inspirations page rotates among four weekly themes: fashion, gardening, home decor and body. Send suggestions to harry.merritt@baltsun.com.
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 12, 2006
They can go at their own pace. It is like watching a television show on TiVo, but with a class." - JOHN WARNER, chemistry professor at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, on the benefits of replacing in-person teaching with podcasts; more college and university instructors are recording their lectures as downloadable files that students can listen to whenever and wherever they want
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | August 3, 2008
Common targets for family spending cuts include work lunches out, premium cable TV channels and the perennial whipping boy of financial advice, a daily latte. But what if you subscribe to satellite radio? Does paying for radio present a good value proposition for you? Satellite radio, most often found in automobiles using special receivers and antennas, is similar to subscription satellite TV. Though new packages and pricing are supposed to be available in the fall, customers have commonly paid about $13 a month to receive service.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2011
A love of books goes a lot farther than reading for 32-year-old Caitlin Phillips. Her first job was working at a used bookstore, where she saw how many books were damaged and relegated to the trash. In 2004, Phillips created Rebound Designs, rescuing old and unwanted books and turning them into one-of-a-kind accessories such as purses and electronics cases. Originally from Gaithersburg, she now calls the Artists Lofts in Mount Rainier her home. You can see her work in person at the Downtown Holiday Market Washington this week or when she comes to Baltimore for the American Craft Council show at the Baltimore Convention Center in late February.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | July 24, 2009
OAKLAND -- Add the attendance from the two services at St. Matthew's in Oakland and the one at St. John's in Deer Park, and the Rev. Chip Lee is fortunate if he preaches to 100 souls on a Sunday. But the former disc jockey-turned-Episcopal priest has hit on another way to reach the faithful. Once a week or so, Lee settles into the professional recording studio in his house here at the far end of the Maryland panhandle, cues the New Age sound of an American Indian flutist and, in a velvety baritone smoothed by 30 years in radio, begins to read from the Book of Common Prayer.
NEWS
By McClatchy Newspapers | December 29, 2008
Although not as plentiful as fitness podcasts, there are many health, medicine and food science shows from which to choose. Here's a sample of them. HEALTH & MEDICINE "NIH Research Radio" nih.gov/news/radio/nihpodcast.htm: The good: The National Institutes of Health takes the dry results of studies it produces and jazzes them up for a listening audience. It even manages to make pelvic-floor disorders seem interesting. The bad: The segments sometimes can descend into a public service announcement, which is confusing because they run PSAs between stories.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,andrew.ratner@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
For you, today's Election Day. For Gavin St. Ours, a Web designer and video producer who lives in the city's Mount Vernon, and tens of thousands like him across the country, it's also Day 4 of NaNoWriMo. And possibly NaPoPoMo. And NaBloPoMo. And NaKniSweMo. And probably some other 'Mo we're unaware of. It sounds like gibberish, but they're abbreviations for National Novel Writing Month. And National Podcast Posting Month. And National Blog Posting Month. And National Knit a Sweater Month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ariane Szu-Tu and Ariane Szu-Tu,Sun reporter | August 21, 2008
Most residents drive through the same Baltimore streets each day, on the way to work or class. Usually it takes an ill-timed stoplight for them to pass a bored or tired glance over a nearby statue or monument, one of the many throughout the city. Vaguely, some might wonder about the significance of that carved effigy and the small plaque beneath. The Baltimore Museum of Art is offering the opportunity for people to fulfill their curiosity. The BMA has created a self-guided tour that passes through neighborhoods including Charles Village and Patterson Park.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | August 3, 2008
Common targets for family spending cuts include work lunches out, premium cable TV channels and the perennial whipping boy of financial advice, a daily latte. But what if you subscribe to satellite radio? Does paying for radio present a good value proposition for you? Satellite radio, most often found in automobiles using special receivers and antennas, is similar to subscription satellite TV. Though new packages and pricing are supposed to be available in the fall, customers have commonly paid about $13 a month to receive service.
NEWS
February 1, 2006
ANNE ARUNDEL -- Track standout Matt Llano of Broadneck always pushes himself to succeed, both in his sport and the classroom. BALTIMORE COUNTY -- Basketball is one of Randallstown point guard Johnny Higgins' many talents. CARROLL -- Basketball-playing members of Winters Mill's initial senior class look to leave as girls state champions. HARFORD -- An outstanding student, North Harford's Garth Grove uses his intellect to benefit him in sports. HOWARD -- After an injury scare during a brief stint in football, Long Reach standout sprinter Brandon Wright is focused entirely on track.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | February 20, 2008
healthcastle.com This eye-catching site has eating and shopping tips from registered dietitians, and offers podcasts for the nutrition-conscious to download on the run.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | July 5, 2007
The Home Run Derby competitors won't have to worry so much (not that they would) about hitting boaters in the celebrated McCovey Cove area just beyond right field at AT&T Park, as officials are banning all motorized boats, and all nonmotorized boats longer than 20 feet, starting Saturday through the All-Star Game on Tuesday. In the funniest All-Star development, Shana Daum, a Giants spokeswoman, said all media, save (natch) for Fox and ESPN, which have television rights, will be barred from taking their own boats out to the cove, but can pay $200 to board a charter to cover events.
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