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By DAN RODRICKS | August 25, 1997
A FRIEND announced last week that he would no longer eat food from the Chesapeake Bay. I told him he was overreacting. Two days later, the Maryland Department of the Environment announced a halt to oyster harvesting in more of Pocomoke Sound because of fecal coliform bacteria levels there.Of course, the president of an Eastern Shore watermen's association says there are no oysters down there anyway; they haven't grown in the lower Pocomoke since 1985.So, in this case, we don't have to worry about the contamination because there aren't any oysters to contaminate.
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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1999
Two state-funded land trusts have brokered a deal to preserve nearly 1,000 acres of marsh and woodland off Pocomoke Sound on the lower Eastern Shore, some of the southernmost land in Maryland. The Maryland Environmental Trust and the Lower Shore Land Trust accepted a conservation easement from Ralph Partlow, a lawyer for Allfirst Bank in Baltimore, and Ned Gerber, an Eastern Shore conservationist and executive director of Chesapeake Wildlife Heritage. Partlow and Gerber bought the land, five parcels roughly between Jenkins Creek and Ape Hole Creek for $60,000 from 16 property owners, then signed a conservation easement that protects the land from development and frees them from paying property taxes on it. About 30 acres of the tract, the portion closest to Byrdtown, could be developed, but the rest is marsh and would be all but impossible to develop because of state restrictions.
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NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
Eastern Shore watermen got more bad news about water quality yesterday, as high bacteria levels forced state officials to expand an area of Pocomoke Sound that is off limits to the harvesting of oysters and clams.The restriction, effective Sept. 1, closely follows the state's unrelated six-day closure of the lower Pocomoke River this month, when thousands of fish were killed, in part, because of a microorganism called Pfiesteria piscicida in the water.In yesterday's action, the Department of the Environment ordered a halt to shellfish harvesting in the Pocomoke Sound after routine water sampling showed unsafe levels of fecal coliform -- contamination that state officials blamed on wildlife and other natural sources.
TRAVEL
By Bruce Friedland and Bruce Friedland,Sun Staff | August 22, 1999
The morning sun filtered through the forest canopy like a stage light, drawing our attention to another bend in the river. We were making our way slowly upstream from Porters Crossing in a shallow channel at times not much wider than our canoes. Except for a woodpecker off in the distance, the only sound to be heard was the whoosh of paddles breaking the water.Were we experiencing the river much differently than the Pocomoke Indians who lived here three centuries ago? Probably not, although they were likely on the river searching for food.
NEWS
By MARCIA MYERS and MARCIA MYERS,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Timothy B. Wheeler contributed to this article | August 27, 1997
The discovery of about 2,000 dead fish in Pocomoke Sound early yesterday prompted health officials to reissue an advisory against swimming, fishing and other contact with the water in that area.The fish kill is the second in two days in Virginia waters just beyond the mouth of the Pocomoke. Nearly all the fish exhibited lesions like those caused by a toxic microorganism, Pfiesteria piscicida, that is suspected of killing more than 10,000 fish nearby at Shelltown.The organism also is being studied as the possible cause of a string of ailments, including lesions and respiratory problems, that have troubled watermen and others who have had contact with the water in recent months.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
Saying it was all a misunderstanding, Tyson Foods yesterday withdrew its request to relax Virginia pollution limits for a tributary of the Pocomoke Sound where one of its poultry processing plants discharges wastewater.Tyson President Donald "Buddy" Wray wrote Virginia's director of environmental quality after news reports that the state had proposed allowing the company's plant in Temperanceville to discharge up to 2 1/2 times more ammonia into Sandy Bottom Branch.The state's proposal drew fire from officials of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, who contended that the ammonia would add to nutrient pollution problems in Pocomoke Sound, which was closed in the summer after fish kills were blamed on Pfiesteria piscicida.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1999
Two state-funded land trusts have brokered a deal to preserve nearly 1,000 acres of marsh and woodland off Pocomoke Sound on the lower Eastern Shore, some of the southernmost land in Maryland. The Maryland Environmental Trust and the Lower Shore Land Trust accepted a conservation easement from Ralph Partlow, a lawyer for Allfirst Bank in Baltimore, and Ned Gerber, an Eastern Shore conservationist and executive director of Chesapeake Wildlife Heritage. Partlow and Gerber bought the land, five parcels roughly between Jenkins Creek and Ape Hole Creek for $60,000 from 16 property owners, then signed a conservation easement that protects the land from development and frees them from paying property taxes on it. About 30 acres of the tract, the portion closest to Byrdtown, could be developed, but the rest is marsh and would be all but impossible to develop because of state restrictions.
TRAVEL
By Bruce Friedland and Bruce Friedland,Sun Staff | August 22, 1999
The morning sun filtered through the forest canopy like a stage light, drawing our attention to another bend in the river. We were making our way slowly upstream from Porters Crossing in a shallow channel at times not much wider than our canoes. Except for a woodpecker off in the distance, the only sound to be heard was the whoosh of paddles breaking the water.Were we experiencing the river much differently than the Pocomoke Indians who lived here three centuries ago? Probably not, although they were likely on the river searching for food.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
For several weeks there have been reports of large numbers of croakers present in Tangier and Pocomoke sounds, although relatively few had been taken on hook and line.Now, however, according to catch reports from the Department of Natural Resources, the hardheads are on the bite, with anglers taking fish to 3 pounds in the sounds and from Hooper Island Straits.Best baits for croaker are pieces of soft crab or bloodworms, and areas of oyster rock or hard bottom close to sharp dropoffs are the best locations.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | December 30, 1990
From The Sun Dec. 30, 1840-Jan. 5, 1841Jan. 2: Yesterday afternoon Mr. Benjamin Rigden of Harford County was arrested and brought before Justice Jones, charged with harboring two runaway slaves -- Sally and her child -- the property of Mr. James Wilks, of this city.Jan. 5: It is stated in the Catholic Almanac for 1841, just published in this city by Fielding Lucas, Jr., that the Catholic population of the United States is estimated at 1,300,000.From The Sun Dec. 30, 1890-Jan. 5, 1891Dec. 31: Three gowns will be sent from Baltimore today with the White House as their destination and the handsomest of the three will be worn by Mrs. Benjamin Harrison at her reception on New Year's Day.Jan.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
Saying it was all a misunderstanding, Tyson Foods yesterday withdrew its request to relax Virginia pollution limits for a tributary of the Pocomoke Sound where one of its poultry processing plants discharges wastewater.Tyson President Donald "Buddy" Wray wrote Virginia's director of environmental quality after news reports that the state had proposed allowing the company's plant in Temperanceville to discharge up to 2 1/2 times more ammonia into Sandy Bottom Branch.The state's proposal drew fire from officials of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, who contended that the ammonia would add to nutrient pollution problems in Pocomoke Sound, which was closed in the summer after fish kills were blamed on Pfiesteria piscicida.
NEWS
By MARCIA MYERS and MARCIA MYERS,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Timothy B. Wheeler contributed to this article | August 27, 1997
The discovery of about 2,000 dead fish in Pocomoke Sound early yesterday prompted health officials to reissue an advisory against swimming, fishing and other contact with the water in that area.The fish kill is the second in two days in Virginia waters just beyond the mouth of the Pocomoke. Nearly all the fish exhibited lesions like those caused by a toxic microorganism, Pfiesteria piscicida, that is suspected of killing more than 10,000 fish nearby at Shelltown.The organism also is being studied as the possible cause of a string of ailments, including lesions and respiratory problems, that have troubled watermen and others who have had contact with the water in recent months.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 25, 1997
A FRIEND announced last week that he would no longer eat food from the Chesapeake Bay. I told him he was overreacting. Two days later, the Maryland Department of the Environment announced a halt to oyster harvesting in more of Pocomoke Sound because of fecal coliform bacteria levels there.Of course, the president of an Eastern Shore watermen's association says there are no oysters down there anyway; they haven't grown in the lower Pocomoke since 1985.So, in this case, we don't have to worry about the contamination because there aren't any oysters to contaminate.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
Eastern Shore watermen got more bad news about water quality yesterday, as high bacteria levels forced state officials to expand an area of Pocomoke Sound that is off limits to the harvesting of oysters and clams.The restriction, effective Sept. 1, closely follows the state's unrelated six-day closure of the lower Pocomoke River this month, when thousands of fish were killed, in part, because of a microorganism called Pfiesteria piscicida in the water.In yesterday's action, the Department of the Environment ordered a halt to shellfish harvesting in the Pocomoke Sound after routine water sampling showed unsafe levels of fecal coliform -- contamination that state officials blamed on wildlife and other natural sources.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
For several weeks there have been reports of large numbers of croakers present in Tangier and Pocomoke sounds, although relatively few had been taken on hook and line.Now, however, according to catch reports from the Department of Natural Resources, the hardheads are on the bite, with anglers taking fish to 3 pounds in the sounds and from Hooper Island Straits.Best baits for croaker are pieces of soft crab or bloodworms, and areas of oyster rock or hard bottom close to sharp dropoffs are the best locations.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 25, 2013
Millions in federal funds are to be spent in Maryland to help protect Smith Island, Crisfield and other coastal communities from devastating flooding like that caused by last year's Superstorm Sandy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announced Thursday her department would dole out $162 million for 45 restoration and research projects to help Atlantic coast communities fend off storm surges and rising sea level.  The restoration projects focus on shielding marsh and wetlands at wildlife refuges, but studies are to be funded that would improve flooding and storm resilience of coastal communiites as well.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Two men were rescued from a fishing boat in Ape Hole Creek near Crisfield on Wednesday after the boat began taking on water, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The father of a man onboard the fishing boat, the Carolyn Jeanne, alerted crew members at Coast Guard Station Crisfield that the boat was sinking about 2:15 p.m., after his son called him, the Coast Guard said. The a 25-foot Coast Guard boat located the 41-foot Carolyn Jeanne near the Pocomoke Sound Wildlife Management Area about 15 minutes later and quickly made contact with the two men on board.
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