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NEWS
August 23, 2000
A slim schooner of a woman, driven by strong winds and a broken heart, floundered barefoot across the eastern plains until arriving at the edge of a village. Here she cast out a line and collapsed over the tiller. Some people foud her in the morning, asleep in her gale-torn clothes. Upon reviving, she either would not or could not answer their questions about her home. As the local tailor had only just died, the villagers asked her if she could sew. She inclined her head gravely and raised one hand in a graceful but exotic gesture.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 8, 2014
According to a new federal database put online last week, pharmaceutical companies and device makers paid doctors some $380 million in speaking and consulting fees over a five-month period in 2013. Some doctors received over $500,000 each, and some got millions of dollars in royalties from products they helped develop. Doctors claim these payments have no effect on what they prescribe. But why would drug companies shell out all of this money if it didn't provide them a healthy return on their investment?
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NEWS
By [TANIKA WHITE] | August 26, 2007
Ever wished your favorite dress was more user-friendly? Sure, it's pretty, but wouldn't it be nice if it treated you like your best pair of jeans and came with a set of handy pockets for your cash, cell phone and lip gloss? Designers have figured out that today's woman wants more from her clothes than just good looks. Many of the hottest looks in dresses for summer and fall conveniently come with pockets. So ditch the heavy handbag and go hands-free in dresses such as these local favorites: 1. Camille dress by Dace Price: $225 Wear it to work; wear it to a party or just out for the day. This ultra-chic dress is a sexy but comfortable shape and comes in a gorgeous, versatile color: chocolate brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
"To day has bin a memorable day," Emilie Frances Davis wrote in a miniature diary on Jan. 1, 1863, the date the Emancipation Proclamation became law. "I thank God I have bin here to see it. The day was religiously observed, all the churches were open. We had quite a Jubilee in the evening. I went to Joness to a party, had a very blessest time. " Davis, a 21-year-old seamstress and freeborn black woman living in Philadelphia, was jotting down her feelings about the event that came to be known as Jubilee Day in one of three pocket diaries she kept from 1863 to 1865 during the height of the Civil War. The diaries, which somehow avoided destruction, are being published now for the first time.
NEWS
February 13, 1992
An apparently forgetful Overlea man came to the Baltimore County Courts building in Towson this week to get a marriage license but got something else instead.He was arrested on a possession of marijuana charge.It seems David A. Bush, 36, of the first block of Leatherwood Road, tried several times to get through the courthouse metal detector Tuesday, but he kept setting off the electronic signal.The security guard at the Bosley Avenue entrance to thebuilding then asked the man to empty his pockets.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | April 16, 1991
Police are always looking for the smoking gun when they are on a case.Yesterday they were looking for a pair of smoking pants.At 10:30 yesterday morning, Baltimore police say, a man with his hands in his pockets walked into the Capital Savings Bank in the 400 block of North Charles Street and proceeded to help himself to money in two cash drawers.Unbeknownst to the thief, however, he grabbed two dye packs which resemble stacks of cash but are designed to explode and spatter a bank robber with dye to help thwart robberies and immediately identify a suspect.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 18, 1995
Washington -- Six score and 10 years ago, as the great man lay dying, an anonymous mourner carefully emptied his pockets -- perhaps suspecting their contents might offer some insight into the long, lean figure who had just led his country through a Civil War.Surely, he must have realized the irony: The only money Abraham Lincoln had on him that night was a Confederate $5 bill.Yesterday, in the basement of the theater where Lincoln was assassinated on Good Friday 1865, those items -- the bill, a pair of eyeglasses, a pocketknife, a cuff button, a linen handkerchief, a wallet, a handful of newspaper clippings, a watch fob -- were put on display for only the second time ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | January 10, 1992
The Empty Pockets Saloon is a pretty good place to go if your pockets are indeed near-empty, because the food and drink prices at this Locust Point bar are miles removed from those of the nearby Inner Harbor.A glance out the saloon's front window gives as firm a geographic fix on the neighborhood as you could ask for: Formstone-clad row houses stand across the street, and off to the east is the giant Domino Sugar sign looming like a leftover prop from Barry Levinson's filmography.There has been a tavern here for more than 50 years, but the present incarnation dates only to 1990.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | April 13, 1993
After 12 people were shot in an East Baltimore neighborhood during a Saturday night craps game, looters rifled through the pockets of the more seriously injured, stealing money, jewelry and other belongings, police said.The thefts compounded an already tense situation in the community, said Maj. Alvin Winkler of the Eastern District."It is a very difficult neighborhood for us, because the good citizens there are so afraid," Major Winkler said. "What bothers me is that people didn't call us and tell us there were people shooting craps in their neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | July 7, 1993
Stuffed pork chops are common fare, but a contemporary fruity stuffing can lend an exotic element with minimal effort.The stars of our stuffing here are air-dried cranberries which can be found now in the produce sections of most large supermarkets.In the entree recipe, the stuffing not only serves as the starch for the meal, but also keeps the meat moist. Since the meat has pockets sliced into it, you actually have two thin slices of pork that cook very quickly. Be sure not to overcook because the meat will quickly become tough and dry. The simple glaze of jalapeno jelly lends lots of flavor to the pork and is also good for basting other items such as poultry and fish.
NEWS
By David Horsey | June 10, 2014
I'm sure the insurgent conservatives who call themselves the tea party, the folks who have rocked the Republican Partyand pushed the country's agenda to the right, are perfectly nice people. They are good to their grandkids and don't kick their dogs. And I think they genuinely care about their country. What I wonder about, though, is whether they really understand who it is that they are supporting. They claim to represent the interest of average Americans -- the upright, hard-working men and women who pay the taxes, rear the next generation and struggle to make ends meet.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
At 16, Dorant Wells has experienced the complexities of what Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark school desegregation ruling, has wrought: He attended a middle school full of students of different colors and nationalities, but one where he sometimes felt there were lower expectations for black students. Now at his nearly all African-American high school, Milford Mill Academy in Baltimore County, he sees value in the special character of the school, while acknowledging he may be less prepared to enter a diverse world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
No one can beat the Irish when it comes to spinning a yarn. And when they weave threads of satire and bittersweetness in between the humor, we're talking a little bit of verbal heaven. "Stones in His Pockets" is a cool example. The witty work from 1996 by Belfast-born playwright Marie Jones receiving an exhilarating production at Center Stage, is, above all, a great yarn. If you only heard the lines spoken - on the radio, say - this story about the collision of a rural Irish town and a big, dumb movie company from the States would easily spring to life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
"Stones in His Pockets," a play about an American film company invading a community in rural Ireland, has more than a dozen characters, but only two actors. That means a lot of quick switches between genders, ages and, above all, accents. For its production of this work by Irish playwright Marie Jones, Center Stage started with a pair of versatile performers - Clinton Brandhagen, an Everyman Theatre resident member; and New York-based Todd Lawson. Then the company brought in a dialect expert to help those disparate voices ring true.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Most compliments of Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco usually start and end with his strong right arm. However, Flacco's feet are garnering plenty of praise these days. Flacco's ability to get out of the pocket and make throws - or at least avoid a sack - has been at the forefront of the quarterback's improved form recently. In his past two games, Flacco has completed 41-of-61 passes for 524 yards, two touchdowns and one interception.   “Joe has always been pretty mobile, but he has definitely taken that part of his game to another level,” Ravens coach John Harbaugh said.
NEWS
April 24, 2013
Congress passed the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge (STOCK) Act in 2012 in response to the public outcry over members' self-serving insider trading scandal last year. As with most laws, what is a crime for citizens was not illegal or unethical for members of Congress and their staffs. The STOCK Act addressed this loophole by requiring lawmakers and government officials to post their financial transactions online. It was a fleeting moment of transparency and accountability.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | October 1, 1994
When the call came from California, Bill Richardson juggled his schedule and grabbed a plane west.A lengthy courtship was over, and a couple had decided to endow a professorship at Hopkins.Over lunch in Los Angeles, the president of the Johns Hopkins University and the donors pinned down details. He returned to Baltimore with a commitment of yet another $2 million, a gift that is to be announced later this fall.Through the years, he's learned to move quickly when major donors beckon."I didn't want to let it hang fire," Dr. Richardson says, recalling the trip he made last year, "because people can change their minds."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | January 18, 2007
Actor and comedian Jim Gaffigan pauses in mid-sentence to chew. He's chomping down on chili while talking about Hot Pockets - the subject of one of his most famous bits. More than five years after he first started riffing on the ridiculousness of the microwavable convenience food, Gaffigan still does the joke live. Hot Pockets will definitely be a part of his Lyric Opera House show tomorrow. "Sometimes you work on a joke, and it's kind of done," Gaffigan said. "The Hot Pocket phenomenon is just expanding in a never-ending fashion."
NEWS
April 11, 2013
The politicians of Maryland made a major miscalculation during this session. I still have some change in my pocket. Perhaps they should have put a parking meter in front of my house? Leonard Magsamen, Nottingham
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 7, 2013
With zero touchdown passes, one interception and three sacks, quarterback Andrew Luck finished with a 59.8 passer rating in the Indianapolis Colts' 24-9 loss to the Ravens in Sunday's AFC Wildcard playoff game. But the top overall pick in the NFL draft in April impressed the Ravens defensive players with his ability to scramble, which he used three times to gain first downs. “He's amazing. He was keeping plays alive,” cornerback Corey Graham said. “He looked like Big Ben [Roethlisberger of the Pittsburgh Steelers]
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