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By Rita St. Clair | July 6, 2008
There's an 8-foot framed opening between my living room and dining room. It strikes me as an unattractive architectural feature, partly because the furniture styles of the two rooms are not compatible. The opening also gives guests a distracting view into the dining room both before and after dinner.I've considered installing doors, but they would have to be large and there's no wall space for them to open outward. A pair of bi-fold doors might be a good option, though I've never seen any I liked.
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BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair | July 6, 2008
There's an 8-foot framed opening between my living room and dining room. It strikes me as an unattractive architectural feature, partly because the furniture styles of the two rooms are not compatible. The opening also gives guests a distracting view into the dining room both before and after dinner.I've considered installing doors, but they would have to be large and there's no wall space for them to open outward. A pair of bi-fold doors might be a good option, though I've never seen any I liked.
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BUSINESS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Contributing Writer | September 11, 1994
TTC Howard Katz enjoys a bit of rural life in the city.When the Baltimore native tires of his Victorian townhouse and yearns for trees and open spaces, he just strolls across the street to Patterson Park, where he can bury himself in nature.If he wants to enjoy the park from afar, he can climb to his roof deck. Standing on the deck -- three stories above the street -- Mr. Katz sees a wide expanse of green."The park is wonderful," says Mr. Katz, 37. "A lot of people like living near the water, but I like the trees.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | May 23, 2008
From the ornately decorated entrance hall of her Catonsville home, Andy Braid offers a somewhat unusual welcome to first-time visitors: "If you don't like Victorian, you're in the wrong house." No mistaking the era here. From the wraparound driveway off the wide, tree-lined street, through a cast-iron gate emblazoned "1895," along a flagstone path to a covered front porch dripping with gingerbread trim, the intent is clear - a trip back in time. "People feel like they're visiting grandma," said Braid, 49, chief operating officer at nearby Spring Grove Hospital Center.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | May 23, 2008
From the ornately decorated entrance hall of her Catonsville home, Andy Braid offers a somewhat unusual welcome to first-time visitors: "If you don't like Victorian, you're in the wrong house." No mistaking the era here. From the wraparound driveway off the wide, tree-lined street, through a cast-iron gate emblazoned "1895," along a flagstone path to a covered front porch dripping with gingerbread trim, the intent is clear - a trip back in time. "People feel like they're visiting grandma," said Braid, 49, chief operating officer at nearby Spring Grove Hospital Center.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzieand Randy Johnson | November 10, 1990
When Bob and Madelaine Fletcher bought their Baltimore row house five years ago, it didn't have some things they needed, like a decent kitchen or usable bathroom, and it had several things they didn't want, like a lot of dark green paint and an extremely narrow hallway on the first floor.But it also had a lot of exactly what they did want: Room."It was just a large space," Madelaine says, "and that was attractive."They are only the third owners of the circa-1880 house. The previous owners hadn't done much to harm the house, the Fletchers say. For instance, it hadn't been carved up into a warren of tiny apartments, as many of the neighborhood's other houses had been.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
A homebuyer in Baltimore certainly doesn't need to leave the city limits to live in the lap of luxury. One of the area's finest homes is found at 206 Goodwood Gardens in Roland Park. This magnificent Colonial Revival, built of stucco and featuring a side porch that wraps around to the rear of the home, dates to 1907 and was once home to Daniel Willard, who served as president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad for 31 years. Located on almost a half-acre of manicured lawns and gardens, this property is being sold for $2.2 million.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | February 3, 2008
Architectural and decorative detail are built into this Charles Village Victorian house. The main floor's high ceilings have plaster relief designs, some leafy, some geometric. Underfoot, the wood floors feature parquet patterns with distinctive border designs. Deep crown moldings, marble fireplaces and pocket doors add to the picture. A turret distinguishes the house, its windows making the parlor and a third-floor suite bright. "There are lots of arches in this house. You see them repeated in the hallways," said Brett Cohen.
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By Beth Smith | March 3, 1996
Letting light into their dining room was top priority with Baltimore couple when they hired architect Walter Schamu to renovate their 19th-century farmhouse that borders Lake Roland. The entire house had a dark charm," recalls Mr. Schamu. "But we wanted to open it up to light and to the view."The solution for the dining room was inspired by a panel of stained glass that had been designed in the early 1980s by artist Roland Greefkes for the couple's previous home. Used as a window to let light into that house, the panel had been dismantled and moved to the 1850s farmhouse.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Imagine a Baltimore rowhouse so deep that it sits on two parallel streets and, consequently, has two addresses. Mike and Matt Knoepfle, brothers and partners in Building Character, a firm that renovates city houses, have taken on their largest project to date at 2110 Cambridge St. and 2117 Fleet St. The 3,600-square-foot Canton property with five bedrooms, four bathrooms and plenty of entertaining space on multiple levels has an asking price of...
BUSINESS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Contributing Writer | September 11, 1994
TTC Howard Katz enjoys a bit of rural life in the city.When the Baltimore native tires of his Victorian townhouse and yearns for trees and open spaces, he just strolls across the street to Patterson Park, where he can bury himself in nature.If he wants to enjoy the park from afar, he can climb to his roof deck. Standing on the deck -- three stories above the street -- Mr. Katz sees a wide expanse of green."The park is wonderful," says Mr. Katz, 37. "A lot of people like living near the water, but I like the trees.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzieand Randy Johnson | November 10, 1990
When Bob and Madelaine Fletcher bought their Baltimore row house five years ago, it didn't have some things they needed, like a decent kitchen or usable bathroom, and it had several things they didn't want, like a lot of dark green paint and an extremely narrow hallway on the first floor.But it also had a lot of exactly what they did want: Room."It was just a large space," Madelaine says, "and that was attractive."They are only the third owners of the circa-1880 house. The previous owners hadn't done much to harm the house, the Fletchers say. For instance, it hadn't been carved up into a warren of tiny apartments, as many of the neighborhood's other houses had been.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
A traditional floor plan? Almost. Lots of light? Absolutely. Convenient storage? Everywhere. Those were among the key points in discussions with an architect when Mary Ellen and Leon Kaplan sought to have a home built in Cockeysville 15 years ago. They wanted a traditional house with substantial areas open not only for guests, but also so they could watch their four children. "We've had parties with up to 100 people, and you can do more in the summer when you use the patios," Mary Ellen Kaplan said.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
If an English country squire or a wealthy industrialist of the Gilded Age were to have an in-town home, 106 E. Chase St. would fit the bill to a tee. Built in the 1880s, the detached, three-story Romanesque-style home fits well among the other elegant residences in Mount Vernon. "This house is one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable," said listing agent Julie Canard of Long & Foster Real Estate. "There is no way you could duplicate this, for millions of dollars. " The home's original owner, George Jenkins, was enamored of the skill and craftsmanship of builders who emigrated from Europe.
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