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By Michael Pakenham | July 13, 2003
Just Curious About Science, Jeeves, by Erin Barrett and Jack Mingo. Pocket Books. 288 pages. $14. From the nice people who bring you the Ask Jeeves Web site (www.ask.com), now comes a sequel to Just Curious books on animals, nature, history and miscellany. This is not a substitute for a graduate degree in technology, and for lots of people, some of the entries are hardly obscure. But there is enough here to provide an evening of delight, or -- more likely -- dozens of brief delights. How is it that humans and giraffes have an identical number of neck bones?
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By John Coffren and John Coffren,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
CENTREVILLE, Va. - Fifteen Trekkers, including members of the Star Trek Association of Towson, tuned in at a party last night to watch the series finale of Star Trek: Enterprise (2001-2005). What they saw looked more like a lost episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987-1994), with Cmdr. Will Riker and Counselor Deanna Troi (guest stars Jonathan Frakes and Marina Sirtis) getting more camera time than series regulars. Nobody complained. These fans - forced by the size of the party to relocate to a friend's larger Virginia house - were split last night over whether a hiatus is what the franchise needs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 17, 2000
"The New Yorker Book of Literary Cartoons," edited by Bob Mankoff (Pocket Books, 105 pages, $19.95). Adam and Eve, unshockingly naked, sit in a grove of shedding apple trees. The caption speaks for Adam: "I can't help thinking there's a book in this." A few pages later, a beach scene: A uniformed cop stands, mildly menacingly, above a folding-chaise seated man with a large book in his hands and lap. Thc policeman speaks: "I'm sorry, sir, but Dostoyevsky is not considered summer reading.
NEWS
By Jean Patteson and Jean Patteson,The Orlando Sentinel | October 12, 2003
Jackie Walker has been conducting style seminars all across the country for 15 years, and the audience reaction is always the same: "The women crowd around me afterward," she says. "They ask, 'Do you have a book? I want to take this information home with me.' " Now, at last, the wardrobe guru does have a book: I Don't Have a Thing to Wear: The Psychology of Your Closet (Pocket Books, $12). It is co-authored by Judie Taggart, a fashion writer. "My mission is to give women self-esteem.
NEWS
August 23, 1993
POCKET BOOKS is out with its January 1994 catalog. Among its offerings will be the paperback edition of "the story that has all America talking" -- "Amy Fisher: My Story," by Amy Fisher with Sheila Weller."
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | February 10, 1993
Move over, Dr. Spock, there's a new generation of books about pregnancy and parenting out there.From "The Miracle Year," a guide to the six months before and after the birth of a first baby, to "When Good Kids Do Bad Things," a guide for the parents of teen-agers, and everything in between: "The Six Vital Ingredients of Self-Esteem and How to Develop Them in Your Child," "The Seven Secrets of Effective Fathers" and "Raising Your Type A Child."There's even "Miss Manners' Guide to Rearing Perfect Children" and whole bookshelves more -- a boomlet of baby books to keep pace with the boomlet of babies.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times News Service | October 23, 1999
All of us say stupid things. Luckily, there usually aren't tape recorders or videocams around to capture them. But politicians and celebrities, which these days are increasingly difficult to tell apart, aren't quite so lucky.Two books memorialize what happens when celebrities and politicians stray from their scripted remarks. The books, compiled by Ross and Kathryn Petras, are cleverly titled "The Stupidest Things Ever Said by Politicians" (Pocket Books, 1999) and "Stupid Celebrities: Over 500 of the Most Idiotic Things Ever Said by Famous People" (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 1998)
NEWS
By Jean Patteson and Jean Patteson,The Orlando Sentinel | October 12, 2003
Jackie Walker has been conducting style seminars all across the country for 15 years, and the audience reaction is always the same: "The women crowd around me afterward," she says. "They ask, 'Do you have a book? I want to take this information home with me.' " Now, at last, the wardrobe guru does have a book: I Don't Have a Thing to Wear: The Psychology of Your Closet (Pocket Books, $12). It is co-authored by Judie Taggart, a fashion writer. "My mission is to give women self-esteem.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
Ken Starr's report has already cost taxpayers $40 million. Now your local bookstore wants to hit you up for just a little more. At least three publishing companies are hawking instant-book versions of the report -- bound in paperback and, thankfully, un-illustrated. And next month, it arrives on audio-tape. Commuters, beware.You could, of course, get the 445-page document for free inside many newspapers or on the Internet (as almost 6 million people did last weekend). But publishers say customers want a more enduring reference guide to the Lewinsky affair.
FEATURES
By John Coffren and John Coffren,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
CENTREVILLE, Va. - Fifteen Trekkers, including members of the Star Trek Association of Towson, tuned in at a party last night to watch the series finale of Star Trek: Enterprise (2001-2005). What they saw looked more like a lost episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987-1994), with Cmdr. Will Riker and Counselor Deanna Troi (guest stars Jonathan Frakes and Marina Sirtis) getting more camera time than series regulars. Nobody complained. These fans - forced by the size of the party to relocate to a friend's larger Virginia house - were split last night over whether a hiatus is what the franchise needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 13, 2003
Just Curious About Science, Jeeves, by Erin Barrett and Jack Mingo. Pocket Books. 288 pages. $14. From the nice people who bring you the Ask Jeeves Web site (www.ask.com), now comes a sequel to Just Curious books on animals, nature, history and miscellany. This is not a substitute for a graduate degree in technology, and for lots of people, some of the entries are hardly obscure. But there is enough here to provide an evening of delight, or -- more likely -- dozens of brief delights. How is it that humans and giraffes have an identical number of neck bones?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2001
For those of us busy proving once again that Kenneth Grahame got it right when he had Water Rat declare in "Wind In The Willows" that there is nothing more worth doing than messing about in boats, there is cause to lay aside, albeit briefly, our sandpaper, brushes and bottom paint. Publishers, aware of the atavistic urge that drives so many of us to get shipshape as the weather warms, never tire of trying to distract us from our seasonal labors. We are faced this year with a shelfful of maritime books that take us as far back as Jason and the Argonauts, through the great sea battles under sail, to the dwindling craft of wooden boat-building today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 17, 2000
"The New Yorker Book of Literary Cartoons," edited by Bob Mankoff (Pocket Books, 105 pages, $19.95). Adam and Eve, unshockingly naked, sit in a grove of shedding apple trees. The caption speaks for Adam: "I can't help thinking there's a book in this." A few pages later, a beach scene: A uniformed cop stands, mildly menacingly, above a folding-chaise seated man with a large book in his hands and lap. Thc policeman speaks: "I'm sorry, sir, but Dostoyevsky is not considered summer reading.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times News Service | October 23, 1999
All of us say stupid things. Luckily, there usually aren't tape recorders or videocams around to capture them. But politicians and celebrities, which these days are increasingly difficult to tell apart, aren't quite so lucky.Two books memorialize what happens when celebrities and politicians stray from their scripted remarks. The books, compiled by Ross and Kathryn Petras, are cleverly titled "The Stupidest Things Ever Said by Politicians" (Pocket Books, 1999) and "Stupid Celebrities: Over 500 of the Most Idiotic Things Ever Said by Famous People" (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 1998)
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
Ken Starr's report has already cost taxpayers $40 million. Now your local bookstore wants to hit you up for just a little more. At least three publishing companies are hawking instant-book versions of the report -- bound in paperback and, thankfully, un-illustrated. And next month, it arrives on audio-tape. Commuters, beware.You could, of course, get the 445-page document for free inside many newspapers or on the Internet (as almost 6 million people did last weekend). But publishers say customers want a more enduring reference guide to the Lewinsky affair.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 1997
American literary culture appears to be in worse jeopardy than ever. For years, Cassandras have been bemoaning that multinationals have taken over publishing. Myopically focused on the bottom line, they have squandered mega-advances on the likes of the Danielle Steels and the John Grishams, allowing precious few books of literary merit to rise to the surface. That's old news.What's new and of greater cause for alarm is the sad fate of the few works of literary fiction that had been finding publishers.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | November 22, 1991
Leonardtown -- Now Gerry Carroll can enjoy the fun part of having a first novel published. He can savor admiring reviews for "North S*A*R," his book about Navy pilots in Vietnam, and appreciate the experience of a stranger walking up in the post office and telling him, "Good book."It means a lot to get praise from old Navy buddies -- so difficult to fool because they, too, saw it all. One even told him, "It was like you typed up tapes from my youth."But 18 months ago, when Gerry Carroll sat down to write his book, he had the usual neophyte author's doubts, and then some.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | August 11, 1996
I would so love to believe! If creatures from beyond the bounds of Earth are visiting, roaming, conversing here, knowing all about it would make our mundanity richer, more interesting by far. If invaders - endowed with technical and intellectual capacities that make earthlings seem like severely challenged gerbils - are tinkering with us, it would be a gas to be aware.Yes!Consider the odds. There are millions of major objects in our galaxy, galaxies beyond and the constant expansion of consciousness of more galaxies.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | August 11, 1996
I would so love to believe! If creatures from beyond the bounds of Earth are visiting, roaming, conversing here, knowing all about it would make our mundanity richer, more interesting by far. If invaders - endowed with technical and intellectual capacities that make earthlings seem like severely challenged gerbils - are tinkering with us, it would be a gas to be aware.Yes!Consider the odds. There are millions of major objects in our galaxy, galaxies beyond and the constant expansion of consciousness of more galaxies.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
When Vicky Iovine told her husband she was pregnant for the fourth time in six years, he said, "How could you do this to me?" And she said, "Wait -- I thought you did this to me."Nowadays when the youngest one does something that brings tears to his eyes, she has been known to toss out, "And that is the child you didn't want!" and run out of the room as fast as she can.Which is to say, women should not despair at their husbands' initial response to the news of their pregnancy. Most men come around eventually.
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