Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPoaching
IN THE NEWS

Poaching

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A fish poaching case that began in February 2011 with a discovery of mysterious, illegally set nets full of tens of thousands of pounds of striped bass off Kent Island is finally coming to a close. Two Tilghman Island watermen pleaded guilty Friday in U.S. District Court to illegally taking 185,925 pounds of striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. Michael D. Hayden, 41, and William J. Lednum, 42, admitted to selling the striped bass for $498,293 through a ring they operated between 2007 and 2011, according to court documents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Lawrence "Daniel" Murphy, 37, of St. Michaels pleaded guilty Friday to illegally harvesting striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. He served periodically as a helper on the Kristin Marie between 2007 and 2012 with Tilghman Island watermen Michael D. Hayden, Jr. and William J. Lednum. In early 2011, he, Hayden and Lednum attempted to harvest more than 20,000 pounds of striped bass using illegal, unattended and unmarked weighted gill nets fish around "Bloody Point" on the bay before the season was opened.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candy.thomson@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 24, 2010
An eclectic group of outdoors lovers, conservationists and animal rights advocates are asking state lawmakers to toughen poaching laws and give Natural Resources Police officers more authority and tools to do their jobs. In testimony and written pleas before the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee Tuesday, representatives of the organizations painted a grim picture of a law enforcement agency that has seen its responsibilities grow while its ranks have shrunk by nearly half in the last 15 years.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Two watermen were fined nearly $1,500 for oyster poaching on the Eastern Shore, the first conviction stemming from a network of radar and cameras the state launched in 2010 to detect illegal seafood harvesting. Brothers William and Irving Catlin, both of Westover in Somerset County, were fined $1,000 and $450, respectively, after state Natural Resources Police caught them with seven bushels of oysters Nov. 25, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's office said Friday. A police officer detected the watermen's boat in an oyster sanctuary area near Deal Island and monitored it as he responded to their location, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candy.thomson@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 3, 2010
Eight Rock Hall men were charged last week with rockfish poaching, the first arrests under a new system that imposes penalties based on the severity of the crime. On Feb. 23, Natural Resources Police charged William Howard Beck, 43, with possessing striped bass greater than 36 inches and mutilating the tail to mask the size of the fish. Officers said they caught Beck when they checked J & J Seafood in Rock Hall and found striped bass with cut tails. The next day, officers charged John Franklin Riggs, 43, with failing to check in striped bass during the required times.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | December 9, 2009
A Washington fish wholesaler and two of its buyers have been indicted by a federal grand jury in Greenbelt for their alleged roles in the largest striped bass poaching case in Chesapeake Bay history. Ocean Pro Ltd., also known as Profish, and Timothy Lydon of Bethesda and Benjamin Clough of Grasonville have been charged in federal district court with purchasing illegally caught striped bass from the Maryland and Virginia portions of the Potomac River from 1995 through 2007.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Officers have returned to the scene of the crime, where last year they pulled up miles of illegal nets filled with 12.6 tons of striped bass from the frigid waters off Kent Island. This year they are armed with new weapons: side-scan sonar to detect underwater nets, new laws passed by the General Assembly that expand their authority and public sentiment that has demanded a halt to poaching of the state's signature fish. "It was just a few bad apples, but they almost ruined it for everyone," said Natural Resources Police Cpl. Roy Rafter as he prepared to board a waterman's boat Wednesday near a spot known as Bloody Point.
NEWS
By Sarah Polus, Capital News Service | December 30, 2013
The weeks leading to the holidays tend to be the most active for oyster poachers in the Chesapeake Bay, but the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and state police were hoping in recent days that new technology and harsher penalties would help them crack down on illegal oyster harvesting. Poaching includes harvesting undersized oysters, exceeding bushel limits or harvesting in areas designated as sanctuaries, said Natural Resources Police Capt. David Larsen said. Mostly due to overharvesting and disease, "currently less than 1 percent of historic levels of oysters exist in the bay," said Sarah Widman, a Department of Natural Resources Fishery spokeswoman.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
Cold fish may be a pejorative term when applied to a person, but to a pretty piece of summer salmon, simmered gently in aromatic liquid and chilled for serving, it's actually a compliment. Poaching is an easy, low-fat treatment for any kind of fish in hot weather. Though this method does involve some cooking, the fish can be prepared hours ahead - perhaps at a cooler time of day - and served cold with a refreshing salad or vegetables. If you need your fish in a hurry, poaching works, too. Poaching also invites experimentation.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Contributing Writer | July 25, 1993
Because I was intimidated by too many television chef programs, fish poaching was not among my preferred cooking methods. As I watched the masters swaddling a whole fish in cheesecloth and wrestling it into a $150 fish poacher, I decided I'd rather get out the grill. Poaching looked too risky. I could barely fit four hamburgers into my skillet; what could I do with a whitefish?It took me years to realize that poaching enough fish for two is far easier than doing a whole salmon or comparable fish.
NEWS
By Sarah Polus, Capital News Service | December 30, 2013
The weeks leading to the holidays tend to be the most active for oyster poachers in the Chesapeake Bay, but the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and state police were hoping in recent days that new technology and harsher penalties would help them crack down on illegal oyster harvesting. Poaching includes harvesting undersized oysters, exceeding bushel limits or harvesting in areas designated as sanctuaries, said Natural Resources Police Capt. David Larsen said. Mostly due to overharvesting and disease, "currently less than 1 percent of historic levels of oysters exist in the bay," said Sarah Widman, a Department of Natural Resources Fishery spokeswoman.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 18, 2013
A Tilghman Island commercial fisherman has been charged with witness tampering and intimidation in a federal investigation into alleged poaching of striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay, prosecutors announced Wednesday. Michael D. Hayden, Jr., 41,was arrested Tuesday, according to a news release issued by U.S. attorney Rod J. Rosenstein. Prosecutors say agents of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Maryland Natural Resources Police learned while investigating alleged striped bass poaching that Hayden had allegedly tried to manipulate some witnesses' testimony to a grand jury while trying to prevent others from testifying at all.  The criminal complaint against Hayden also alleges he threatened to retaliate against a potential witness he believed to be cooperating with investigators.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Officers have returned to the scene of the crime, where last year they pulled up miles of illegal nets filled with 12.6 tons of striped bass from the frigid waters off Kent Island. This year they are armed with new weapons: side-scan sonar to detect underwater nets, new laws passed by the General Assembly that expand their authority and public sentiment that has demanded a halt to poaching of the state's signature fish. "It was just a few bad apples, but they almost ruined it for everyone," said Natural Resources Police Cpl. Roy Rafter as he prepared to board a waterman's boat Wednesday near a spot known as Bloody Point.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
A federal grand jury in Camden, N.J., has indicted six people, including two from Maryland, and two companies for their part in an alleged oyster poaching scheme from 2004 to 2007. Mark Bryan of New Market and Pam Meloney of Secretary were arrested and charged with creating false federal and state reports for two oyster businesses, Harbor House Seafood in Seaford, Del., and Reeves Brothers of Port Norris, N.J., to hide that they exceeded their New Jersey quota. The indictment says Reeves overharvested some years by as much as 90 percent, with the value of the illegal oysters in excess of $600,000.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
With Baltimore in the midst of Restaurant Week, there are probably many happily dining on rockfish these days, and rightly so. Rockfish (more commonly known as striped bass) represent one of the Chesapeake Bay's most treasured bounties, both a worthy challenge to anglers and a delight on the dinner plate. But if there is a lingering bitterness surrounding the catch of the day, it is the still-fresh memory of last winter's poaching incidents. Natural Resources Police hauled in an estimated 26,000 pounds of rockfish caught illegally in unattended gill nets.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
State fisheries officials outlined a sweeping plan they hope to implement by December to curb commercial striped bass poaching in the Chesapeake Bay. The announcement Wednesday night came just four months after miles of illegal nets filled with 13 tons of fish were discovered by police in the waters off Kent Island. Among other things, the proposal would require real-time reporting by phone and electronically of when commercial boats leave the dock and return, and how many striped bass they caught along with the sequential numbers on the tags that watermen must attach to each fish and a positive identification system for nets.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 10, 2000
LEONARDTOWN - Crockett and Dragon liked to kill bucks, the bigger, the better. And they liked to kill lots of them. Folks around St. Mary's County knew about the hunting prowess of the father-and-son team and their friends, and said they were mighty good and mighty lucky. But their luck ran out in 1998, when Dragon - David Allen Pulliam Jr. - made a mistake that would eventually bring down the entire bunch. Pulliam, 19, shot another hunter, starting an investigation by the Natural Resources Police that resulted in the indictment of six men on 141 counts of criminal and natural resources violations.
NEWS
By Joshua Reichert | July 20, 1999
IN RECENT years, increasing numbers of restaurants in the United States and elsewhere have been offering the savory delights of exotic fish from around the world. Many of these fish are the product of overfishing and poaching practices that put entire species at grave risk. Order one of these as an entree, and you're not the only one who will be paying a steep price.The Patagonian Toothfish, more commonly referred to as Chilean Sea Bass in the United States, is a prime example of how a fish species can suffer when it becomes the latest delicacy.
SPORTS
May 14, 2011
The folks who decide how we gather and protect the Chesapeake Bay's bounty may need to borrow Capt. Jack Sparrow's wacky compass to keep their bearings. Clearly, the headline-grabbing activities of poachers last year and this year have presented the state and its fisheries managers with a window of opportunity to make sweeping changes that address sustainability, accountability and enforceability, not only on the commercial side but on the recreational side, too. But given the attention span of our lawmakers, that window won't be open very long.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.