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By Newsday | June 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- America's first successful criminal defense based on premenstrual syndrome may have helped a Virginia surgeon avoid a drunken-driving conviction, but it has also revived controversy over the validity of making a courtroom issue of the monthly physical and psychological changes reported by many women."
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NEWS
By Mariana Minaya and Mariana Minaya,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
The latest in a series of studies revealing unexpected benefits from vitamin D has shown that a calcium and vitamin D-rich diet may reduce the risk of premenstrual syndrome. Researchers queried about 3,000 women from 1991 to 1999 as part of the Harvard's Nurses' Health Study to determine how much calcium and vitamin D women ingested through their diet and supplements. Researchers did not measure how much vitamin D participants got from sunlight. None of the women in the study had experienced PMS when the study began.
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FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | June 25, 1991
IT'S POSSIBLE we will see this advertisement: ''Have PMS? Call the law office of Steven L. Win, I'll get you off. I win a case at least once a month.''I bet you think I'm kidding. Well, read on.America's first successful criminal defense based on premenstrual syndrome may have helped a Virginia surgeon, a woman, avoid a drunken-driving conviction. Her lawyer used as her defense the fact that she had PMS.The doctor was stopped for driving erratically while transporting her three children and for use of abusive behavior and kicking a state trooper in the groin.
NEWS
By Mark Schwed and Mark Schwed,Cox News Service | November 21, 2004
Killer mood swings. Hormones gone haywire. Hair-trigger tempers. Uncontrollable crying. Bloating. For eons, women have suffered the inconvenience, the indignation and the pain of premenstrual syndrome -- PMS. They've put up with the jokes, the mocking, the misunderstanding. And no matter how much they tried to explain what they were feeling, men just didn't get it. Until, maybe, now. Scientists studying herds of lusty rams in Scotland and a psychotherapist surveying modern man in America have come up with a startling conclusion, one that may have women dancing for joy. Men get PMS-ish, too. Millions of men. "It's payback time," says Jed Diamond, a California psychotherapist and author of the groundbreaking Male Meno-pause.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 8, 1991
There have been days, weeks even, some women say, when they felt they were out of control. When they'd cry for no reason, and scream at their kids over nothing; when they couldn't get out of bed because of depression or heart-racing anxiety or overwhelming fatigue.But they couldn't explain why -- and they couldn't put a name to their symptoms -- until, finally, they recognized the cyclic pattern of premenstrual syndrome, or PMS, and sought treatment."I was a raging looney-tune," confessed Cindy Richardson, 39, of Carroll County, whose mood swings sent her into weeping fits for no reason.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 5, 1995
The tranquilizer Xanax can relieve the tension, irritability and aches of severe premenstrual syndrome, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center researchers say.Their study, published in Wednesday's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, also found that the hormone progesterone is not particularly effective in treating PMS, even though it has been widely prescribed for that purpose for more than a decade.Coming on the heels of a study that found Prozac can help with severe PMS, the new research offers yet more insight into the hormonal and nervous system interactions that trigger the mysterious malady.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 1, 1998
RESEARCHERS are now saying that PMS -- premenstrual syndrome -- is not a psychiatric disorder but one caused by the negative effects of a woman's hormones on her brain, and I'd just like to welcome them to the party.Where have you been, boys?Are any of you married? Know any women?Medical scientists have apparently taken the blindfolds off and can see what has been in front of them all along. It is an elephant, gentleman. And for five or six days out of every month, you can find it sitting on my nerves.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | July 4, 1995
Q: I have tried many different remedies but continue to be terribly irritable before each menstrual period. Is it true that there is a new treatment for this problem?A: A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine reported the results of a Canadian study on the treatment of premenstrual syndrome with fluoxetine (Prozac). Surveys have shown that between 3 percent and 8 percent of North American women suffer from premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms, which may begin seven to 10 days before menstrual periods and end soon after the onset of menstrual flow, include increased tension, irritability, agitation, difficulty sleeping and fatigue.
NEWS
By Mark Schwed and Mark Schwed,Cox News Service | November 21, 2004
Killer mood swings. Hormones gone haywire. Hair-trigger tempers. Uncontrollable crying. Bloating. For eons, women have suffered the inconvenience, the indignation and the pain of premenstrual syndrome -- PMS. They've put up with the jokes, the mocking, the misunderstanding. And no matter how much they tried to explain what they were feeling, men just didn't get it. Until, maybe, now. Scientists studying herds of lusty rams in Scotland and a psychotherapist surveying modern man in America have come up with a startling conclusion, one that may have women dancing for joy. Men get PMS-ish, too. Millions of men. "It's payback time," says Jed Diamond, a California psychotherapist and author of the groundbreaking Male Meno-pause.
NEWS
By Mariana Minaya and Mariana Minaya,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
The latest in a series of studies revealing unexpected benefits from vitamin D has shown that a calcium and vitamin D-rich diet may reduce the risk of premenstrual syndrome. Researchers queried about 3,000 women from 1991 to 1999 as part of the Harvard's Nurses' Health Study to determine how much calcium and vitamin D women ingested through their diet and supplements. Researchers did not measure how much vitamin D participants got from sunlight. None of the women in the study had experienced PMS when the study began.
FEATURES
By Edward M. Eveld and Edward M. Eveld,Kansas City Star | May 24, 1998
As researchers get closer to pinpointing the biological factors of premenstrual syndrome, the race is on to tame it.Health experts have trotted out a variety of pills and powdered potions, even Prozac, as potential remedies for irritability, anxiety and headaches. But some women are finding relief with a much simpler prescription: food.Cravings, especially for sweets, are a well-known component of PMS. But women can handle their cravings in a way that reduces symptoms, said Joanne Mentzel, a registered pharmacist with the Women's Health America group in Madison, Wis. The group of pharmacists specializes in women's health issues, especially PMS and menopause.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 1, 1998
RESEARCHERS are now saying that PMS -- premenstrual syndrome -- is not a psychiatric disorder but one caused by the negative effects of a woman's hormones on her brain, and I'd just like to welcome them to the party.Where have you been, boys?Are any of you married? Know any women?Medical scientists have apparently taken the blindfolds off and can see what has been in front of them all along. It is an elephant, gentleman. And for five or six days out of every month, you can find it sitting on my nerves.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 1996
Virtually every woman who ovulates experiences premenstrual changes that three-fourths of women recognize as an impending period. For many, these changes involve symptoms, like breast tenderness, bloating or food cravings, that may be annoying or discomforting but do not disrupt their lives.Sometimes, however, the physical symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, popularly called PMS, are disturbing enough to prompt women to seek relief. Although women differ in how well they tolerate premenstrual discomfort, it is not "all in their heads."
NEWS
September 27, 1995
An article in Monday's editions of The Sun reported incorrectly that the city pays PMS Parking Inc. $327,000 a year to manage the new parking garage at Penn Station. In fact, the company receives $165,000 as a management fee; the balance goes to the company to cover maintenance and other costs.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 5, 1995
The tranquilizer Xanax can relieve the tension, irritability and aches of severe premenstrual syndrome, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center researchers say.Their study, published in Wednesday's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, also found that the hormone progesterone is not particularly effective in treating PMS, even though it has been widely prescribed for that purpose for more than a decade.Coming on the heels of a study that found Prozac can help with severe PMS, the new research offers yet more insight into the hormonal and nervous system interactions that trigger the mysterious malady.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | July 4, 1995
Q: I have tried many different remedies but continue to be terribly irritable before each menstrual period. Is it true that there is a new treatment for this problem?A: A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine reported the results of a Canadian study on the treatment of premenstrual syndrome with fluoxetine (Prozac). Surveys have shown that between 3 percent and 8 percent of North American women suffer from premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms, which may begin seven to 10 days before menstrual periods and end soon after the onset of menstrual flow, include increased tension, irritability, agitation, difficulty sleeping and fatigue.
FEATURES
By Edward M. Eveld and Edward M. Eveld,Kansas City Star | May 24, 1998
As researchers get closer to pinpointing the biological factors of premenstrual syndrome, the race is on to tame it.Health experts have trotted out a variety of pills and powdered potions, even Prozac, as potential remedies for irritability, anxiety and headaches. But some women are finding relief with a much simpler prescription: food.Cravings, especially for sweets, are a well-known component of PMS. But women can handle their cravings in a way that reduces symptoms, said Joanne Mentzel, a registered pharmacist with the Women's Health America group in Madison, Wis. The group of pharmacists specializes in women's health issues, especially PMS and menopause.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 1996
Virtually every woman who ovulates experiences premenstrual changes that three-fourths of women recognize as an impending period. For many, these changes involve symptoms, like breast tenderness, bloating or food cravings, that may be annoying or discomforting but do not disrupt their lives.Sometimes, however, the physical symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, popularly called PMS, are disturbing enough to prompt women to seek relief. Although women differ in how well they tolerate premenstrual discomfort, it is not "all in their heads."
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Author Carol Tavris likes to sprinkle her lectures with a few mind teasers:If women have PMS (premenstrual syndrome), why don't men have HTS (hypertestosterone syndrome)?Why do women have housewives' syndrome if they stay home -- but superwoman's syndrome if they also work?Why, oh why, do women get all the symptoms and disorders, she muses."I love talking about the question of men and women," said Dr. Tavris, who wrote "The Mismeasure of Woman," a book that attacks society's assumptions about the differences between men and women.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 3, 1993
It was years ago, when those of us who spoke of premenstrual syndrome were on the cutting edge of New Wave feminist topics, and I was trying to explain this curse to a male friend."
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