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BUSINESS
January 14, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer will lead state officials tomorrow in lobbying Weyerhaeuser Co. to make a new fire-retardant plywood in Maryland.The appeal by officials will coincide with the company's introduction of "Blazeguard," an alternative to roofing plywoods treated with fire-retardant chemicals. Blazeguard has a protective sheathing that acts as a fire retardant.Weyerhaeuser, a wood manufacturer based in Tacoma, Wash., makes the product at a plant in Longview, Wash. But the company is searching for an East Coast manufacturing site.
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NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Close on the heels of the eclectic and engaging exhibit of Sondheim Artscape Prize winners at the Baltimore Museum of Art comes the eclectic and engaging exhibit of the Baker Artist Award winners. The annual Baker competition, administered by the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance under the direction of the William G. Baker Jr. Memorial Fund, has an unusual starting point: Artists from the Baltimore area working in any genre are invited to upload their work onto a website for anyone to see. A private jury looks at this online community of artists — more than 700 uploaded entries for this year's competition — and chooses three recipients of the $25,000 Mary Sawyers Baker Prize and awards up to nine $1,000 "b-grants.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | December 23, 1990
A multibillion-dollar potential class-action claim against the major manufacturers and distributors of allegedly defective fire-retardant roofing plywood has been dismissed by a U.S. District Court judge in Baltimore, squelching an attempt at blanket relief for thousands of unhappy town house owners."
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Model trains, not turkey, top the Thanksgiving menu for the Schumm family of Harford County. They have, for the past nine years, forgone the traditional dinner so they can treat thousands of others to a visual feast at the Kennedy Krieger Institute's Festival of Trees, which opens Friday at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. For the past several months, the Havre de Grace residents have been building a massive train garden in a storefront space donated by the operators at the Perryville Outlet Center in Cecil County.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1996
A trailer loaded with plywood overturned at Interstate 70 and U.S. 29 yesterday morning, backing up westbound traffic for several hours, state police said.The driver of the tractor-trailer, whose name state police refused to give last night, was taken to Howard County General Hospital for treatment. He was not seriously injured, state police said.The incident occurred about 9 a.m. while the vehicle was headed north on U.S. 29 on the ramp to westbound I-70. State police said the load of plywood shifted and caused the vehicle to fall on its side.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | August 26, 2001
Can new plywood be installed on a 40-year-old roof without removing the old? Roy Gingrich of Ellicott City has a 40-year-old house with an asphalt shingle roof surface. The existing asphalt shingles need replacement, so he plans to do a tear-off and re-shingle. Because the plywood roof sheathing under the shingles has become brittle and weak, he plans to install new plywood as well as new shingles. But can he simply install new plywood over the old plywood sheathing to avoid the extra time, expense and attic debris that he believes removing the old plywood would entail?
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | April 7, 1991
An Ellicott City professional condominium park is suing a Georgia wood products manufacturer for $1.5 million, claiming the company has knowingly sold defective roofing materials.The lawsuit, filed in Howard County Circuit Court, alleges that Hoover Treated Wood Productsof Thomson, Ga., has "engaged in a fraudulent marketing campaign" that exaggerated the suitability of its fire-retardant-treated (FRT) plywood roof sheathing.Although the FRT plywood roofing controversy is one of the knottier problems being addressed by homebuilders nationwide, the lawsuit is the first legal action in Howard County, where as many as 18,000 homes may be affected.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | August 1, 1991
A local architect has invented a tool to help the owners of town homes decide whether to keep the roofs over their heads.Thousands of town-house roofs are failing because fire-retardant chemicals used to treat the plywood sheathing caused it to deteriorate.As a result, home owners and builders face the prospect of replacing unsound roofs. The cost of a new roof for a typical town house is about $2,000 to $2,500, although it can be much more.Stanley Sersen, head of Architectural Support Group Inc. of Columbia, has invented a proof-load testing device, which is designed to show the strength of the plywood.
NEWS
By FROM SUN AND BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF REPORTS | January 12, 2006
A tractor-trailer overturned this morning in the northbound lanes of the Jones Falls Expressway near the Guilford Avenue exit, spilling plywood across the road and forcing police to shut down northbound lanes for several hours and reroute traffic. Shortly before 3 p.m., the Baltimore City Department of Transportation announced that the highway had reopened. Police said investigators were trying to determine the cause of the accident. There was no initial report of any injuries. Originally published January 12, 2006, 3:06 PM EST
BUSINESS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
Maryland's highest court ruled yesterday that homeowners cannot sue the makers of defective fire-resistant plywood -- used in 30,000 townhouses in Maryland -- because Maryland's consumer laws offer no protection to such buyers.The Court of Appeals ruled, 4-3, that a group of Montgomery County homeowners cannot sue makers of fire-retardant treated plywood.The decision essentially blocked the only avenue of redress for thousands of Maryland homebuyers."This is a black day for a lot of consumers and for a lot of homebuyers in Maryland," said Gary Mason, the lawyer representing the homeowners' group.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
First, an earthquake rattled Carol Boehlein in her Southeast Baltimore rowhouse. Now Hurricane Irene is threatening to blow her windows in. That's why Boehlein and her husband, Bernard, were at a Home Depot in Southeast Baltimore on Friday afternoon with their handyman, buying plywood. They planned to nail the boards to the windows of the house they've lived in for 40 years. "After what happened with the earthquake," Boehlein said, "I don't take nothing for granted. " Across the Baltimore region, people were preparing for the hurricane, the brunt of which is expected to lash Maryland Saturday night and Sunday morning.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,dick.irwin@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Two elementary school students were rescued Wednesday morning by city firefighters after they became stuck in a mound of mud at a construction site near their school, said a spokesman for the Fire Department. Because of their ages, their names were not released. About 8 a.m., the boy, 12, and the girl, 8, were walking along Sinclair Lane near Clareway on their way to classes at Sinclair Lane Elementary School when they entered a muddy area and became stuck several feet from dry land, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, the spokesman.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | March 30, 2007
Arlene Rosenthal, of Columbia, spotted a puzzling item in the Post about a 21-inch snowfall in Texas in 1934. "Most of it melted shortly after reaching the ground," the story said. "Actual snow depth never exceeded 5 inches." If it melted that fast, Arlene asks, "how was the total of 21 inches obtained?" Do I really look that old? Today, snow is measured on a white plywood surface, cleared and remeasured every six hours. Perhaps more-frequent observations inflated the measured depth, while accumulations nearby melted and compressed.
NEWS
By FROM SUN AND BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF REPORTS | January 12, 2006
A tractor-trailer overturned this morning in the northbound lanes of the Jones Falls Expressway near the Guilford Avenue exit, spilling plywood across the road and forcing police to shut down northbound lanes for several hours and reroute traffic. Shortly before 3 p.m., the Baltimore City Department of Transportation announced that the highway had reopened. Police said investigators were trying to determine the cause of the accident. There was no initial report of any injuries. Originally published January 12, 2006, 3:06 PM EST
BUSINESS
By Trif Alatzas and Trif Alatzas,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2003
A sharp increase in plywood prices is rattling the construction industry and leaving consumers with higher costs for new houses and home-improvement projects. Some prices for plywood and other wood-type boards used to build and renovate roofs, floors and walls have doubled since the spring, according to industry figures. Experts blame the increase on a short supply of plywood and stronger-than-expected summer demand for new homes as mortgage interest rates hit historic lows. The weak supply is owed to a collection of factors, including the summer's wet weather, fires in the West and consolidation among wood mill operators after years of depressed plywood prices.
NEWS
May 8, 2003
THE ARMY FESSED up yesterday and admitted that Halliburton Co. stands to make a lot more money out of the mess in Iraq than it had been letting on. Halliburton had gotten a no-bid contract that supposedly was limited to extinguishing oil fires, but then Saddam Hussein's men inconveniently neglected to set many wells ablaze. No worry - there were a few other paragraphs buried in that no-bid contract, paragraphs that talk about Halliburton's "operation of facilities" and - our favorite - "distribution of products."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | August 21, 1991
A Columbia condominium association is suing the property's developer, claiming defective plywood has caused several roofs to deteriorate.The Forsgate condominium association filed suit Aug. 9 against Keough Homes of Allview Inc., seeking $384,000 to replace the wood. Thesuit claims Keough was negligent when it installed fire-retardant-treated (FRT) plywood in the town house roofs.Managers at Keogh Homes of Allview could not be reached for comment.The FRT plywood in the roof sheathing is designed to keep firefrom spreading, according to the suit.
NEWS
February 28, 1997
Police logPasadena: Someone stole $4,040 worth of plywood overnight Tuesday from a home under construction in the 1200 block of Lincoln Drive.Pub Date: 2/28/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen | January 19, 2003
Not a soul around. Just this thing. This thing hanging off a tree in a city alley behind rowhouse back yards. Six, seven feet off the ground, plywood is nailed to tree. This is the backboard. A crate, its bottom cut out, is nailed to the plywood. The crate is orange, but it is not an orange crate. Letters on the side say: "Turner Dairy Farms. Penn Hills, PA." This is the basket. The no-name alley is off Guilford Avenue near Chase Street. Nearby Interstate 83 is loud today. The crate job is clean; the makeshift basket lines up perfectly on its makeshift backboard.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 13, 2002
YESTERDAY morning, with rain beating down on Baltimore and the old town looking like death in that nice, autumnal kind of way, I had this thought: The guy with the aquarium place on West 36th Street in downtown Hampden ought to replace the grooved, ornamental plywood on his storefront, or at least paint it. Really. His little shop would look so much nicer with red tile or glazed brick. But that thought was followed immediately by this one: Who am I to say such a thing? This is Hampden, hon, and I'm just an interloper, a passing tourist on the crowded Avenue of Life.
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