Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPlume
IN THE NEWS

Plume

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John R. Johnson Jr. and John R. Johnson Jr.,Tribune Newspapers | October 17, 2009
NASA's recent lunar-punch mission apparently was not the high-profile flop it first appeared to be. Officials at Ames Research Center in Northern California, which managed the mission, released images Friday that clearly show a plume of debris emanating from the Cabeus crater shortly after the space agency's rocket plowed into it. The plume was estimated to reach a height of about a mile above the lunar surface. Creating a plume was key to the mission's success because the goal was to measure dust kicked up by the Centaur rocket to find out if ice might lie hidden in polar craters that haven't seen sunlight in billions of years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Spring stirs pollen, and also dust - high-flying dust that's blown thousands of miles to reach North America in greater amounts than scientists have known before, with potential impact on the climate and air quality. Mineral dust rises from dry expanses in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, rides upper atmospheric winds for days across the Pacific Ocean to the West Coast of the United States and beyond. More than two miles up, it can reach Maryland, where scientists at College Park, Greenbelt and Catonsville have been tracking its global travels with satellite-based instruments in a way they say is more accurate and covers a longer period of time than previous studies.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | September 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A preliminary CIA computer model shows a plume of sarin nerve gas drifted over elements of seven U.S. Army divisions after American engineers blew up Iraqi munitions containing 4.8 tons of poison at the end of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, according to administration officials.More than 130,000 troops were in these front-line units in southern Iraq and Kuwait that routed Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's army from Kuwait during the weeklong ground war.But U.S. officials say poor record-keeping by the Pentagon has prevented CIA analysts from making an accurate estimate of how many troops were exposed to the cloud of sarin that drifted more than 62 miles south from an Iraqi bunker complex called Khamisiyah.
NEWS
By John R. Johnson Jr. and John R. Johnson Jr.,Tribune Newspapers | October 17, 2009
NASA's recent lunar-punch mission apparently was not the high-profile flop it first appeared to be. Officials at Ames Research Center in Northern California, which managed the mission, released images Friday that clearly show a plume of debris emanating from the Cabeus crater shortly after the space agency's rocket plowed into it. The plume was estimated to reach a height of about a mile above the lunar surface. Creating a plume was key to the mission's success because the goal was to measure dust kicked up by the Centaur rocket to find out if ice might lie hidden in polar craters that haven't seen sunlight in billions of years.
NEWS
November 21, 1996
Police logHickory Ridge: 6200 block of Bright Plume: A bicycle was taken Friday from a garage that was either unlocked or left open. There were no signs of forced entry.Pub Date: 11/21/96
NEWS
September 19, 2004
On September 18, 2004, CLARICEBERNICE BLEVINS of Bel Air, MD; beloved wife of Gerald W. Blevins; devoted mother of Patricia L. Burkholder, Robin K. Vicari; Melissa D. Brooks; sister of Bobby H. Roberts, J. Larry Roberts, Nancy Howell and Dottie L. Roberts. Also survived by grandchildren Kristalyn D. Plume, Jonathan C. Plume, Katelyn T. Linson, B. Angelena Vicari, Samantha M. Brooks; great-grandson Connor I. Plume and step-father John M. Roberts. Services will be held in Oak Grove Baptist Church, Bel Air, on Tuesday, September 21 at 10 A.M. Visitation on Monday 7 to 9 P.M. at church and 9 to 10 before the service.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
About 50 residents from the South Baltimore neighborhoods of Wagner's Point, Curtis Bay and Brooklyn, joined by several local lawmakers, lambasted state environmental officials and a chemical company last night for their handling of a chemical spill last week.The residents crowded into the Curtis Bay Community Center for what was supposed to be an "informational meeting" on a hazardous-waste renewal permit for FMC Agricultural Products Chemicals.However, the Maryland Department of the Environment's agenda for the meeting was tossed aside as angry residents demanded answers to their questions about the herbicide spill on the site that sent a gas plume over their neighborhoods.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 4, 2006
Imagine sitting in a church or sitting in a synagogue, trying to have a ... prayer service, and you have half a million bikes running by every minute of the day and night for three weeks. That's what the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally does to this environment." -- DEBRA WHITE PLUME, a Lakota Sioux from the nearby Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, explaining the impact of the annual event in which more than 500,000 bikers arrive in the Black Hills each August.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
Browning-Ferris Industries, owner of the leaking hazardous waste landfill off Solley Road, is proposing to rebuild and relocate its failed system to purify contaminated ground water and return the water to the ground.The existing system, installed last year and shut down in March because it did not operate properly, was designed to pump contaminated water from the ground near the middle of the 65-acre landfill and reinject cleaned water near its western edge.In its plan submitted to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2005
GRANITEVILLE, S.C. - A lethal plume of chlorine leaking from a shattered rail tanker car kept 5,000 residents of this mill town away from their homes and forced officials to bring in repair crews a day after a pre-dawn train wreck and chemical spill killed eight people and sent scores to hospitals. A rapid response by local emergency officials in the hours after two trains collided Thursday morning helped evacuate hundreds of residents from a "hot zone" of contamination around the still-volatile wreck.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 4, 2006
Imagine sitting in a church or sitting in a synagogue, trying to have a ... prayer service, and you have half a million bikes running by every minute of the day and night for three weeks. That's what the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally does to this environment." -- DEBRA WHITE PLUME, a Lakota Sioux from the nearby Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, explaining the impact of the annual event in which more than 500,000 bikers arrive in the Black Hills each August.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2005
GRANITEVILLE, S.C. - A lethal plume of chlorine leaking from a shattered rail tanker car kept 5,000 residents of this mill town away from their homes and forced officials to bring in repair crews a day after a pre-dawn train wreck and chemical spill killed eight people and sent scores to hospitals. A rapid response by local emergency officials in the hours after two trains collided Thursday morning helped evacuate hundreds of residents from a "hot zone" of contamination around the still-volatile wreck.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
On September 18, 2004, CLARICEBERNICE BLEVINS of Bel Air, MD; beloved wife of Gerald W. Blevins; devoted mother of Patricia L. Burkholder, Robin K. Vicari; Melissa D. Brooks; sister of Bobby H. Roberts, J. Larry Roberts, Nancy Howell and Dottie L. Roberts. Also survived by grandchildren Kristalyn D. Plume, Jonathan C. Plume, Katelyn T. Linson, B. Angelena Vicari, Samantha M. Brooks; great-grandson Connor I. Plume and step-father John M. Roberts. Services will be held in Oak Grove Baptist Church, Bel Air, on Tuesday, September 21 at 10 A.M. Visitation on Monday 7 to 9 P.M. at church and 9 to 10 before the service.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2002
MANDEIKOL, Afghanistan - The demolition specialists took the customary precautions. They moved the residents of this settlement in eastern Afghanistan well away from the cave where 90 Russian rockets had been found a few days earlier. They had U.S. soldiers take cover about half a mile away, behind two big rock formations. Only then did Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Wade, the team leader, detonate 45 blocks of C-4 explosive intended to destroy the rockets. The size of the explosion stunned even Wade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
Niche marketing is firmly entrenched in the publishing world, judging by the career of Suzanne Finnamore. Her 1999 comic novel, Otherwise Engaged, cataloged events leading up to a wedding, while her slim new book, The Zygote Chronicles (Grove Press, 126 pages, $22), offers a comic account of a San Francisco advertising executive who is expecting her first baby. Like her previous effort, Finnamore's second novel will be of interest only to those who are or have been involved in similar circumstances.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2001
Nurseryman and landscaper Kurt Bluemel had dealt with groundhogs, rabbits, and rapacious deer. But nothing in his career prepared him for the destructive powers of elephants and giraffes. "They are like organic lawnmowers!" he says in a Czech accent still strong after 40 years in Baltimore. On a gray winter's day, Bluemel stands inside one of the green- houses that blanket his 40-acre property in Baldwin. Nearby, staffers prepare potted grasses -- a sea of blue fescues, yellow and green zebra grass (Miscanthus sinensis 'Zebrinus')
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
More fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 rained down on Jupiter yesterday in a stunning display that amazed astronomers but promises to be just a warm-up for much larger impacts over the next three days.An infrared image snapped by the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii early yesterday shows two circular plumes of hot gas glowing white, like headlights in the fog, southwest of Jupiter's Great Red Spot.They mark the spots where fragments "A" and "C" -- the first and third of the broken comet's 21 visible pieces -- slammed down Saturday afternoon and early yesterday morning.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
Just when you think you know a comet, it throws you a curve ball called fragment M.Yesterday, astronomers at W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii reported that they had seen signs of an impact on Jupiter that seemed to be that of the comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9's missing fragment M, which was thought to have evaporated last year.The report, if confirmed, suggests that -- far from evaporating -- M was still a hunk of matter perhaps as long as five football fields when it shot into the planet Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2000
A rare fossil of a plumed reptile 75 million years older than the earliest known bird is challenging the popular idea that dinosaurs and modern fowl are birds of a feather. The tiny primordial creature, which predates all but the most primitive dinosaurs, had feathers like a bird, according to new research made public today in the journal Science. That has some questioning a widely held theory that birds are descended from the same dinosaur family that gave rise to Tyrannosaurus rex, Velociraptors and other toothsome denizens of a vanished world.
FEATURES
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1998
"Legends of the Plumed Serpent: Biography of a Mexican God," Public Affairs. 240 pages. $35.Mexico has long been a favorite playground for tourists seeking sun-drenched beaches, discos where the music pumps until dawn, and smooth tequila that makes their heads spin. However, there are also tourists who go to Mexico with their brain turned on.For them, biographer Neil Baldwin has written a book about Mexico that aims to be a mix between travel guide and history text. It traces the creation and the enduring power of a mythological symbol older than the nation itself: the plumed serpent god known as Quetzalcoatl.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.