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By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
John Morris Crocker, former owner of a plumbing supply business on Maryland Avenue, died of kidney failure Sept. 23 at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The former Glen Arm resident was 95. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of E.M. Crocker, founder of a Maryland Avenue plumbing supply company, and Dorothy Laws Crocker, a homemaker. He was a graduate of the Landon Academy in Bethesda, where he was a top scorer on its basketball team and quarterback of the football team.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
John Morris Crocker, former owner of a plumbing supply business on Maryland Avenue, died of kidney failure Sept. 23 at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The former Glen Arm resident was 95. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of E.M. Crocker, founder of a Maryland Avenue plumbing supply company, and Dorothy Laws Crocker, a homemaker. He was a graduate of the Landon Academy in Bethesda, where he was a top scorer on its basketball team and quarterback of the football team.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 19, 1994
Of course you can have the plumbing of your dreams. You can have a new whirlpool tub, and you can move the toilet over to accommodate it. You can drop a new porcelain sink into an antique dresser. You can trade a battered tub for a sleek new shower stall. You can switch the places of sink and toilet for better use of space, and you can add a bath in a former closet. You can have a new sink and dishwasher -- new faucets with a sprayer that works, a refrigerator with an icemaker.You can have just about any plumbing you want, no problem.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Ralph M. Vitale Sr., a retired heating and plumbing contractor, died Jan. 11 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 81. The son of Joseph Vitale, a superintendent with the city's water department, and Mary Vitale, a homemaker, Ralph Mario Vitale Sr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Kennedy Avenue. After graduating from vocational school, Mr. Vitale served in the Navy from 1951 to 1955 as a pipe fitter. He was discharged with the rank of petty officer. He had worked with the city water department before establishing Vitale Plumbing & Heating in 1962.
NEWS
April 17, 2007
A plumbing company employee was trapped for several hours yesterday after a trench collapsed outside a West Baltimore home, causing injuries to his legs, a city Fire Department spokesman reported. The man's identity was not available. About 11:30 a.m., a worker for Quality Plumbing was in a 7-foot-deep, 18-foot-long trench making repairs to a sewer line leading to a house in the 2800 block of Koko Lane when a portion of one wall of the trench collapsed, trapping the man up to his knees, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, the spokesman.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
William H. Burgemeister, co-founder of a Baltimore County plumbing company who, with his wife, established the Salem Players amateur theatrical troupe, died Saturday of complications from Parkinson's disease at his Owings Mills home. He was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea, Mr. Burgemeister was a 1939 graduate of Kenwood High School. He enlisted in the Navy at the outbreak of World War II and served aboard the attack transport USS James O'Hara as an electrician's mate during the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy.
NEWS
February 11, 2006
Edward Caplan, founder of a Baltimore plumbing company and a decorated World War II veteran, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Mount Washington resident was 83. The son of immigrant Russian parents, he was born and raised on Eden Street in East Baltimore. He attended Talmudical Academy before cutting short his education to help support his family. In his youth, he played baseball for the Brooklyn Athletic Association and always maintained that he would have been a professional player if not for injuries suffered in the war, family members said.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzieand Randy Johnson | February 2, 1991
Bathroom designs range from supremely simple to devilishly complex, but even the most rudimentary three-fixture layouts can involve a lot of thought and can benefit from a little imagination.Like kitchens, which also have a lot of large, heavy, immobile elements, bathrooms need to be right from the beginning. A world of annoyance awaits you if, for instance, the tub is positioned so the door hits it every time it's opened.Putting new baths in old houses can be tricky. The space may not be ideal, and there are plumbing imperatives that have to be taken into account.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | May 2, 1992
If your house was built before World War II, the plumbing may be a fairly recent feature. If it was built before the turn of the century, indoor plumbing may not even have been a gleam in a contractor's eye.Baltimore didn't have a comprehensive municipal sewage system until 1911, making it the last of the major East Coast cities to have such an amenity, according to Dean Krimmel, curator of local history for the Baltimore City Life Museums.By 1850, "houses of the elite" had cold water indoors, Mr. Krimmel says.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
An estimated 40,000 Maryland homeowners who have faulty polybutylene plastic plumbing have five weeks to stake their claim to a $950 million national settlement -- one of the largest property class-action suits in U.S. history.Under terms settling a Tennessee lawsuit that became final in late 1995, some 6 million homeowners nationwide are seeking compensation for property damage, repair costs and replacement of plumbing systems.In the past four years, a national hot line has received about 143,000 claims, totaling $360 million.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
When the water heater went out at his Pasadena home, Steven Stafford called his home warranty company, which sent a plumber from All State Plumbing, Heating & Cooling to replace it. Stafford paid the plumber $175 in cash to obtain a permit. When the plumber asked for more money, Stafford began to sense something was amiss. "I couldn't understand what their deal was," Stafford said. "They were charging you all these extra things on top of what they were supposed to do. The next thing I knew, I was paying more for their services than the actual water heater cost.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
When are we going to learn that government can't procure custom-designed software the same way it procures plumbing supplies or paving stones? Reading of the suspension of Anne Arundel County's multimillion-dollar emergency dispatch system due to "software problems," I couldn't help but shake my head ("Anne Arundel suspends use of new emergency dispatch system," Dec. 23"). This was yet another example of a government bureaucracy that stubbornly insists that it can procure custom-designed software the same way it procures plumbing supplies or concrete for paving.
EXPLORE
By Diane Brown, dmbrown@comcast.net | December 15, 2011
In the moment it took him to put one foot into the house, with the other foot still outside beyond the storm door, the plumber told me about the slave quarters he had seen in western Howard County. "Oh yeah," he said, raising the right foot from the front step into the hallway, "me and my buddies, we used to go up there to those slave quarters and sit on top of the roof and hunt. It was sumthin'. And they got some of those slave quarters on a bunch of farms all over the county.
NEWS
September 8, 2011
I live in the Phoenix area of Baltimore County and we didn't get power back in our homes until Sept. 2. I understand that power has to be restored to hospitals, nursing homes, emergency treatment centers and other places of critical importance. But BGE should have given more priority to the homes that depend on well water. When the electricity is out, well pumps do not function, leaving our homes without running water and plumbing as well as power. I prepared for the storm by filling pots and bathtubs with water, but it wasn't enough to carry us through six full days without power.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 4, 2011
Big storms, falling trees, downed power lines, cracks in old pipes, raw sewage flowing into rivers - I'd be glad to join Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann in prayer to ward off such calamities, but I have a more practical idea: Convert some of the billions we're spending on national defense to fixing the country's wiring and plumbing. I'd spring for replacing the covered bridges Vermont lost in last weekend's big storm, too. About the power line thing: Tesla, Edison and Westinghouse started engineering electrical power systems in the late 19th century, before my grandmother was born.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | December 18, 2010
With the holiday entertaining season in full swing, you may find yourself lacking a dedicated space for mixing up and serving the latest cocktail. For some, a box of spirits and a six-pack in the fridge might be enough, but for large-scale entertaining, a home bar may be the answer — particularly if you are trying to get your guests out of the kitchen. Bar styles and options are as varied as those for sofas. Victorian, deco, urban contemporary, rustic, wood, metal, glass — whatever look you're trying to achieve, a custom cabinetry specialist can build you a bar to the dimensions and specifications you desire.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
Consider it the Super Bowl of plumbing.At 5: 30 tonight, several hundred volunteers, some of whom began vying for an invitation months ago, will take their assigned places in the freshly tiled bathrooms of the new Ravens stadium downtown.Then, on cue, they will simultaneously flush more than 1,000 toilets and urinals to make sure the plumbing system works.What started as a simple test of pipes and valves has, with the nudging of the team's public relations department, become a full-blown potty party dubbed "Super Flush."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1996
Headlines squealed: SHUTDOWN REROUTES TOURISTS TO TOWN. With many attractions closed in Washington because of the partial federal shutdown, tourists flock to Baltimore.At the Inner Harbor, flockage can be found at the National Aquarium and Maryland Science Center. The new kid on the museum block, the American Visionary Arts Museum, has good company, too. But what's this? A sign off President Street reads: HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. The words on the building say, SEWAGE PUMPING PLANT. Open House.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 15, 2010
Monica Marcum sat in the office of the Baltimore City Historical Society and held a document she discovered among her late father's papers. It was a check dated July 6, 1874, for $62.81 for plumbing materials at the "new City Hall. " She was giving the canceled check to the historical group because she thought it deserved a proper home. She wondered how her father came into possession of this financial document for Baltimore's City Hall, which was under construction during this period and opened for business in 1875.
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