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NEWS
July 3, 2014
Of course, teachers' salaries should depend on how well their students progress over the year ( "A new battle in Md. schools," June 29)! How could anyone object to such a common sense concept? It's exactly the same situation that my doctors are in. I should have lost weight years ago and exercised more. Did I? No. Did I end up with heart disease? Yes. Well, heart disease is in my family's genes, but still, my behaviors should have been different and my doctor should be held accountable - financially.
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NEWS
July 3, 2014
Of course, teachers' salaries should depend on how well their students progress over the year ( "A new battle in Md. schools," June 29)! How could anyone object to such a common sense concept? It's exactly the same situation that my doctors are in. I should have lost weight years ago and exercised more. Did I? No. Did I end up with heart disease? Yes. Well, heart disease is in my family's genes, but still, my behaviors should have been different and my doctor should be held accountable - financially.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | October 24, 1992
Now's the time. If there's anything wrong with your heating system, the hour has come to get it fixed. We get a lot of questions about heat, especially from people who have old houses with balky hot-water or steam equipment.A reader in Baltimore writes: "I have an oil furnace [steam boiler] . . . when the heat comes on it makes a clanking noise so loud TC you can hear it in my driveway . . . we had a new burner installed . . . the oil company I deal with told me I need a plumber to come in and open the large pipes in my basement and bleed the radiators.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
It is a chilling tale of winter, one that in ghost-story fashion begins with a sign that all is not right. Maybe there's a damp spot spreading ominously across a wall, or faint sounds that grow louder and more insistent. "I heard water dripping," Liz Simon-Higgs of Baltimore said, "but mostly what I heard was my water meter spinning. " Similarly, Kacey Gaige heard the tell-tale sound of water on the move in her Severna Park home, "but I wasn't running the laundry. " As she headed into her garage to pick her kids up at school Thursday, the source of the mystery sound was revealed.
NEWS
August 15, 2006
George W. Harrison, a retired plumbing company owner and flag enthusiast, died in his sleep Thursday at his Dundalk home. He was 84. Mr. Harrison was born and raised in Baltimore and attended city public schools. "He was one of eight and had to go to work to help support his family," said his son, Timothy T. Harrison Sr. of Taneytown. Mr. Harrison earned a General Educational Development diploma, and during World War II served as an Army Air Corps reconnaissance photographer assigned to a B-25 Liberator bomber squadron in the Pacific.
NEWS
September 28, 1990
Services for George F. Wolf, a retired plumber and former union official, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Howard H. Hubbard Funeral Home, 4107 Wilkens Ave.Mr. Wolf, who was 87 and lived on Louisiana Avenue in Baltimore Highlands, died Tuesday of heart failure at the Greater Laurel-Beltsville Hospital.He retired nearly 20 years ago as a plumber after working for more than 50 years for contractors through the hiring hall of Plumbers Union Local 48.Active in the labor movement and Democratic political campaigns, he was a former vice president and committee chairman of the local, which is part of the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industries of the United States and Canada.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Columnist | June 26, 2007
Oddly dispiriting as it can be, I often hum "You Can't Always Get What You Want" because truer words cannot be spoken about life as a consumer. First-time homeowner Addie Compton might be singing along with the Rolling Stones now, too, after wrestling with the plumbing problem she had back on Jan. 18. An upstairs toilet in her Violetville home got clogged and leaked wastewater through the living room ceiling. As most of us would do in that situation, the 35-year-old archivist started calling plumbing companies.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2006
Albert Louis Gettier, a retired plumber and longtime recreation league football coach, died Jan. 1 at his Ridgeleigh home after a battle with melanoma. He was 78. He was born and raised in Baltimore and completed eighth grade at St. Bernard's School before he went to work to help support his family. He enlisted in the Army and served during World War II. He was stationed in Germany for four years. During his stint in the Army, he began to correspond with Sophie Burrier, a childhood friend.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
When the water heater went out at his Pasadena home, Steven Stafford called his home warranty company, which sent a plumber from All State Plumbing, Heating & Cooling to replace it. Stafford paid the plumber $175 in cash to obtain a permit. When the plumber asked for more money, Stafford began to sense something was amiss. "I couldn't understand what their deal was," Stafford said. "They were charging you all these extra things on top of what they were supposed to do. The next thing I knew, I was paying more for their services than the actual water heater cost.
NEWS
September 25, 2002
Herbert H. Roberts Sr., a retired plumber, died Monday of complications from cancer at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 68 and lived in the Baltimore County community of White Hall. Before his retirement in 1999, he was a plumber for the Johns Hopkins University on the Homewood campus for 29 years. He previously worked as a welder for Bethlehem Steel Corp. at Sparrows Point. Born in Baltimore and raised in Middle River, he attended Baltimore County public schools. During the Korean War, Mr. Roberts served in the Navy as an aircraft mechanic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A recent afternoon was windowpane-clear, the sun bright and direct. The environment could not have seemed less conducive for communing with the spirit world. And yet, Jeff and Tessa Evason walked up and down a stretch of Annapolis waterfront known as Ego Alley, telling strangers intimate details of their lives that it was seemingly impossible for the couple to have known in advance. The Evasons, who describe themselves on their website as "a mind-reading duo," wished a visibly startled Christine Mae Jones of Hebron a happy 47th birthday as she ate lunch with her husband at a sidewalk café.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
When the water heater went out at his Pasadena home, Steven Stafford called his home warranty company, which sent a plumber from All State Plumbing, Heating & Cooling to replace it. Stafford paid the plumber $175 in cash to obtain a permit. When the plumber asked for more money, Stafford began to sense something was amiss. "I couldn't understand what their deal was," Stafford said. "They were charging you all these extra things on top of what they were supposed to do. The next thing I knew, I was paying more for their services than the actual water heater cost.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Posting after midnight will catch a handful of copy editors and insomniacs, my natural audience, but some of the rest of you may overlook things. So I draw your attention to a late-night, early-morning post at which I chime in with Stan Carey on banned words , before, having been wakened at eight o'clock by the plumber coming to call, I go on with a roundup of items for today. Today, I found out from Language Log, has been declared Passive Voice Day . You may want to explore, and perhaps bookmark, Geoffrey Pullum's link to the astonishing number of posts illustrating that language commenters and writing instructors commonly rail against passive constructions without being able to identify correctly what a passive construction is. In addition to incompetent instruction, we are awash in bad information.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 1, 2011
Earlier this month, the left-wing magazine The Nation highlighted Joe Therrien as a symbol of the Occupy Wall Street movement. A New York City public-school drama teacher, Therrien was frustrated with the shortcomings of the school system. So he quit his job and "set off to the University of Connecticut to get an MFA in his passion -- puppetry. " Three years and $35,000 in student-loan debt later, Therrien returned home, only to find he couldn't land a full-time job. Apparently, a master's in puppetry doesn't provide the competitive edge in the marketplace he'd hoped for. Mr. Therrien joined Occupy Wall Street, constructing giant puppets and "figuring out how to make theater that's going to help open people up to this new cultural consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Richard Yeagley fueled his punchy new film, "The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work," with a fierce hometown nostalgia. This first-time documentary maker grew up near Loch Raven High School — he's a 2002 graduate — and went to Stevenson University when it was still called Villa Julie College. Film degree in hand, he took off for Los Angeles, where he found ready employment; during one stint at Toyota, he helped craft the multi-DVD history of the car manufacturer's first half-century in America.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2010
Milton H. Gable, a retired plumber who had worked at the National Security Agency, died Tuesday of colon cancer at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 85 and a longtime Lansdowne resident. Mr. Gable was born on his family's Gable Avenue farm in Southwest Baltimore. After the death of his mother when he was 8 years old, he and a sister were placed in the General German Orphan Home in Catonsville. "His father, who had been born in 1865, was elderly and could only care for the older children," said his son, Charles M. Gable of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 11, 1995
A friend needed a plumber. She called J. C. Flood. "But," she says, "as soon as I told them I had an Ikea kitchen, they recommended I call Johnny Waters. I hung up and said to my husband, 'Only in Baltimore.' " So she called this Johnny Waters, and he came out to fix a leaking faucet. It happens that his real name is Christopher Kolb. He started his business three years ago and came up with the name when he was trying to think of a catchy pun on johns and water. Soon he was getting calls for John Waters, our favorite hometown director and the man who gave us "Serial Mom," among other delights.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2010
Milton H. Gable, a retired plumber who had worked at the National Security Agency, died Tuesday of colon cancer at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 85 and a longtime Lansdowne resident. Mr. Gable was born on his family's Gable Avenue farm in Southwest Baltimore. After the death of his mother when he was 8 years old, he and a sister were placed in the General German Orphan Home in Catonsville. "His father, who had been born in 1865, was elderly and could only care for the older children," said his son, Charles M. Gable of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
The huge water main break that flooded Dundalk has spawned another outpouring - one of local generosity: from "Len the Plumber," who has given and installed 32 hot water heaters to replace damaged ones, to a couple who were preparing to downsize for their retirement and donated furniture and other belongings. "I told him to bring a truck and take whatever he needed," said Barbara Vallimont, referring to a man whose basement bedroom and all of its contents were destroyed in the Sept. 19 flood.
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