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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 5, 1998
A good friend and fellow food professional told me recently that she has a new term for the way she cooks when entertaining today. She calls her style "creative convenience" cooking."
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 6, 2008
A good way to enjoy watching the Summer Olympics is to snap on the television, put the recliner in the deep-comfort position and order Chinese takeout. I started my Olympics regime about a week early by ordering three versions of Moo Shu Pork, then settling into a recliner and alternately nibbling on the pancakes stuffed with meat and vegetables and working the remote control. Best Bite The Bamboo House Address: 26 Cranbrook Road, Cockeysville Phone: 410-666-9550 Hours: 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, noon-midnight Friday-Saturday The gold-medal winner.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 6, 2008
A good way to enjoy watching the Summer Olympics is to snap on the television, put the recliner in the deep-comfort position and order Chinese takeout. I started my Olympics regime about a week early by ordering three versions of Moo Shu Pork, then settling into a recliner and alternately nibbling on the pancakes stuffed with meat and vegetables and working the remote control. Best Bite The Bamboo House Address: 26 Cranbrook Road, Cockeysville Phone: 410-666-9550 Hours: 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, noon-midnight Friday-Saturday The gold-medal winner.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | January 8, 2006
If you've eaten at one of Jesse Wong's two restaurants in Columbia, you know to expect the unexpected. So it's no surprise that his newest venture, Jesse Wong's Kitchen in Hunt Valley, isn't anything like the other two, and it's not at all a typical shopping center Asian eatery. For one thing, there's live piano music with dinner. A large open kitchen dominates the multilevel space. The kitchen is a stage, with the cooking of your meal the performance. The dining area that looks down on it is contemporary but not minimalist.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 28, 1999
Authentic spring rolls -- thin dough fried to a fragile crisp around a tempting filling -- used to be a rarity except in Chinese restaurants. Now, with ready-made wrappers available at supermarkets, natural food stores and Asian markets, spring rolls from your own kitchen can vie with the best takeout. Most Chinese-style wrappers are 7 to 8 inches square; Japanese spring roll skins are slightly smaller but work just as well. Spring rolls cooked at 375 degrees absorb very little oil because the surface of the dough seals on contact with the hot oil. For most Chinese foods, peanut oil is the best choice.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | May 19, 2004
These days one of the latest trends in kitchen designs is having a second oven, either in the wall or in the range. Linda Stephen's new cookbook, 125 Best Toaster Oven Recipes (Robert Rose Inc., 2004, $18.95), points out that many of us already have a second oven sitting on our countertop. Stephen notes that almost anything you can cook in a regular oven you can cook in a toaster oven. That may come as a surprise to most of us who use our toaster ovens mainly to toast bagels and bake chicken nuggets for the kids.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2004
With a stash of fragrant pho in the back seat, it was a maddening drive home from Pho Nam. The Vietnamese soup smelled so good I wanted to pull over on Baltimore National Pike and have a slurp or two. Pho, made of meat stock and spices, brimming with add-your-own meats, rice noodles, crunchy sprouts, onions, basil and hot pepper slices, is an entire meal in a bowl, one that should be declared the universal comfort food. Pho Nam, in the 40 West Plaza in Catonsville, is a spare but welcoming place that specializes, of course, in pho. The menu is a primer on different ingredients that helps the uninitiated decide among, for example, well-done or rare beef, eye-of-round steak, tripe, meatballs and "soft tendon."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | July 15, 1992
Every culture has some kind of a meal in a wrapper. The wrap in France is the crepe. Mexicans use the tortilla or corn husks. In the Orient, the Japanese wrap of choice is seaweed, the Chinese use a very thin pancake.The new twist in the menu offered here is an Oriental hand meal that comes wrapped in cabbage. It's fun for quick and casual entertaining or for the family.The lightly steamed napa cabbage leaf encloses a colorful combination of vegetable sticks and deliciously seasoned chicken or meat.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 2002
All the entrees you expect to find at a Chinese restaurant, such as General Tso's chicken, beef with broccoli and other favorites, are offered on the Mandarin House menu. "Our specialty is just good Chinese food," said James Kong, the restaurant's owner. Under "Chef's Suggestions" are Empress chicken (chicken chunks dipped in egg batter and lightly fried, then sauteed in a sauce), Quadruple Fragrance Combination (shrimp, scallop, crabmeat and vegetables served on a hot plate), Sauteed Double Flavors (shrimp and shredded garlic chicken served side by side)
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | January 8, 2006
If you've eaten at one of Jesse Wong's two restaurants in Columbia, you know to expect the unexpected. So it's no surprise that his newest venture, Jesse Wong's Kitchen in Hunt Valley, isn't anything like the other two, and it's not at all a typical shopping center Asian eatery. For one thing, there's live piano music with dinner. A large open kitchen dominates the multilevel space. The kitchen is a stage, with the cooking of your meal the performance. The dining area that looks down on it is contemporary but not minimalist.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | May 19, 2004
These days one of the latest trends in kitchen designs is having a second oven, either in the wall or in the range. Linda Stephen's new cookbook, 125 Best Toaster Oven Recipes (Robert Rose Inc., 2004, $18.95), points out that many of us already have a second oven sitting on our countertop. Stephen notes that almost anything you can cook in a regular oven you can cook in a toaster oven. That may come as a surprise to most of us who use our toaster ovens mainly to toast bagels and bake chicken nuggets for the kids.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2004
With a stash of fragrant pho in the back seat, it was a maddening drive home from Pho Nam. The Vietnamese soup smelled so good I wanted to pull over on Baltimore National Pike and have a slurp or two. Pho, made of meat stock and spices, brimming with add-your-own meats, rice noodles, crunchy sprouts, onions, basil and hot pepper slices, is an entire meal in a bowl, one that should be declared the universal comfort food. Pho Nam, in the 40 West Plaza in Catonsville, is a spare but welcoming place that specializes, of course, in pho. The menu is a primer on different ingredients that helps the uninitiated decide among, for example, well-done or rare beef, eye-of-round steak, tripe, meatballs and "soft tendon."
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 2002
All the entrees you expect to find at a Chinese restaurant, such as General Tso's chicken, beef with broccoli and other favorites, are offered on the Mandarin House menu. "Our specialty is just good Chinese food," said James Kong, the restaurant's owner. Under "Chef's Suggestions" are Empress chicken (chicken chunks dipped in egg batter and lightly fried, then sauteed in a sauce), Quadruple Fragrance Combination (shrimp, scallop, crabmeat and vegetables served on a hot plate), Sauteed Double Flavors (shrimp and shredded garlic chicken served side by side)
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 28, 1999
Authentic spring rolls -- thin dough fried to a fragile crisp around a tempting filling -- used to be a rarity except in Chinese restaurants. Now, with ready-made wrappers available at supermarkets, natural food stores and Asian markets, spring rolls from your own kitchen can vie with the best takeout. Most Chinese-style wrappers are 7 to 8 inches square; Japanese spring roll skins are slightly smaller but work just as well. Spring rolls cooked at 375 degrees absorb very little oil because the surface of the dough seals on contact with the hot oil. For most Chinese foods, peanut oil is the best choice.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 5, 1998
A good friend and fellow food professional told me recently that she has a new term for the way she cooks when entertaining today. She calls her style "creative convenience" cooking."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | July 15, 1992
Every culture has some kind of a meal in a wrapper. The wrap in France is the crepe. Mexicans use the tortilla or corn husks. In the Orient, the Japanese wrap of choice is seaweed, the Chinese use a very thin pancake.The new twist in the menu offered here is an Oriental hand meal that comes wrapped in cabbage. It's fun for quick and casual entertaining or for the family.The lightly steamed napa cabbage leaf encloses a colorful combination of vegetable sticks and deliciously seasoned chicken or meat.
FEATURES
By Marlene Sorosky and Marlene Sorosky,Contributing Writer | December 5, 1993
Entertaining during the holiday season is a paradox. Just when we have the most to do is when we have the least time to it. And just when we have the heaviest expenses is when we're lightest in the wallet. But giving up holiday entertaining and a chance to visit with friends is not the only answer.The solution to these age-old dilemmas is a very '90s one -- band together with three or four friends with whom you can share the work, share the expense and share the joy. Be a co-host for a progressive holiday cocktail party.
FEATURES
By Charles Britton and Charles Britton,Copley News Service | February 9, 1992
Over the ages, the Chinese have developed their own way of doing things, especially when it comes to cooking and eating.They may serve soup at the end of the meal, for example, or offer noodles as a birthday dish. Some Chinese techniques run flat against Western practice, and none is more at variance with what we think of as good cookery than the use of prepared sauce concentrates.In the West, we have such products, but those who resort to them had best do so on the sly or else forfeit any claim to "gourmet" status.
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