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NEWS
February 2, 2011
When the mayor summons her best and brightest transportation officials, it isn't for an update on snow removal in the neighborhoods, to discuss technology and workflows that would enable more efficient service delivery, or even to check the status of the backlog of projects citywide. Rather, it's to find out if her $8 million race track is on schedule for Labor Day. Baltimore is spending the bulk of its transportation stimulus funds on Pratt and Light streets — not to make them more attractive gateways to the Inner Harbor but to create a race course so Baltimore Racing Development can hold an IndyCar race.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
For Rick Farrell, all this winter's snow and ice have meant about $1 million in contract work with the city of Baltimore — the welcome return on an investment inspired by 2010's "Snowmaggedon. " Farrell, of Ellicott City, incorporated his commercial power-washing business, Columbia-based Corporate Maintenance Group, in 2004, focusing on shopping centers and parking garages and eventually providing sweeping and other services for the same facilities. Then the "hellacious back-to-back snow storms" of 2010 hit, and the company took a chance, he said — renting every plow and salt-spreader it could get its hands on, installing them on its trucks and picking up work.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
The Maryland Senate spent Wednesday afternoon plowing through the state budget bill and a companion measure shifting part of the cost of teacher pensions from the state to the counties, turning back Republican attempts to amend the legislation. Late in the afternoon, after giving preliminary approval to both measures, senators turned to the big fight of the week: consideration of a revenue bill that includes a $416 million increase in state income tax rates. If that measure and the budget companion bill don't pass, almost $750 million in contingent cuts in the budget bill would take effect.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 4, 2014
When discussions turn to the government, they usually relate to a cast of elected officials ranging from town council member to president of the United States. Invariably, everyone with a knowledge of the comings and goings of these people who have been elected to office has a view of government that is deeply colored by impressions left by the people entrusted by the voters - reasonable or otherwise - to be at the top of the managerial pyramid. Meanwhile, there's a government that operates where the rubber meets the road, and this harsh winter has left some of those public servants with few opportunities to take a breath.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 17, 2010
A 72-year-old Virginia man was killed and three people injured in the Lexington Market parking lot around noon Saturday when the driver of a pickup truck lost control and plowed into a crowd, police and fire officials said. Baltimore City Fire Chief Kevin Cartwright said that a woman driving a white Ford F-150 appeared to have suffered a seizure while driving in the parking lot off North Eutaw Street, causing the truck to strike a group of people. She was treated at University Hospital for a possible seizure.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | February 5, 2010
Kenneth McCullough got the itch to buy a snowplow months ago, acting on a hunch that this winter would be a nasty one. Money, McCullough anticipated, would be there to be made. Turns out McCullough's gut was right. He is prepping for this weekend's snow as if he is a participant in Sunday's Super Bowl. "I'm going to get a good eight hours' sleep, then get up at 5 a.m. [Saturday] and get started," said McCullough, 39, who lives in Reisterstown and plans to canvass Baltimore County for jobs.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The promise of warm weather and the threat of more rain through the rest of this week have pushed the State Highway Administration to craft a two-pronged plan for its continuing winter clean-up operations. The focus: potholes and drainage. Recent cold snaps and snowfalls have left many roadways crumbling in spots, the result of freezing water cracking surfaces and plows and layers of salt compounding the damage. Warmer weather is preferable to cold in fixing pot holes. High temperatures from Wednesday through the weekend are expected to hover between 40 and 60 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
As mild weather continued to melt remnants of recent snowstorms, county officials tried yesterday to dissolve lingering public anger about what they admit was a subpar plowing job. The message: We're sorry, and we'll do better next time. "To those county residents who feel you did not receive the level of service you thought you should, I offer my apology with a sincere pledge that our efforts will continue to give you quality service in the future," Public Works Director John M. Brusnighan wrote in an open letter to Anne Arundel County residents.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 4, 2014
When discussions turn to the government, they usually relate to a cast of elected officials ranging from town council member to president of the United States. Invariably, everyone with a knowledge of the comings and goings of these people who have been elected to office has a view of government that is deeply colored by impressions left by the people entrusted by the voters - reasonable or otherwise - to be at the top of the managerial pyramid. Meanwhile, there's a government that operates where the rubber meets the road, and this harsh winter has left some of those public servants with few opportunities to take a breath.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
As a Baltimore resident, I want to thank our officials for doing a commendable job at getting our city moving again. Although I know there are many that would disagree with me, I feel they have not looked at the whole picture. The major roadways were opened as soon as possible. As I traveled from Canton to Lutherville each day, I observed the slow but steady improvement. The city did all it could with the resources it had. Perhaps all those individuals who were riding around with plows on their trucks making money by the minute privately could have taken the example of Max Furman of Max's on Broadway.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The promise of warm weather and the threat of more rain through the rest of this week have pushed the State Highway Administration to craft a two-pronged plan for its continuing winter clean-up operations. The focus: potholes and drainage. Recent cold snaps and snowfalls have left many roadways crumbling in spots, the result of freezing water cracking surfaces and plows and layers of salt compounding the damage. Warmer weather is preferable to cold in fixing pot holes. High temperatures from Wednesday through the weekend are expected to hover between 40 and 60 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
When Rob Rogers woke up the morning of Dec. 8 and looked at an ominous weather forecast predicting several inches of snow or the threat of freezing rain, he knew exactly where he wanted to be. The 24-year-old Hampden resident rushed to his computer, navigated to Stubhub.com and saw that ticket prices for that afternoon's game between the Ravens and Minnesota Vikings were dropping. He snapped up tickets for himself and three friends and threw on long underwear, warm clothes, a winter jacket and, of course, his No. 82 Torrey Smith jersey and was off to M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
On Sunday morning, I ventured out to do my grocery shopping before the snow storm arrived. Being a native of Western New York, I favor the familiar offerings of Wegmans, so I have little difficulty justifying the drive from Baltimore to Columbia every week. As I was leaving the store, the snow had begun in Columbia, and I anticipated some slow going for the drive home. I progressed up Route 29, and the snow became heavier to the point of obscuring the lane lines. People from snowy areas would not call this heavy snow since visibility was still fair, but it was persistent and a healthy amount creating challenging driving conditions.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Baltimore County officials on Wednesday released the identity of a county worker who died after emergency responders were called to a former county golf course earlier this week, and crash investigators are probing what happened to him as he was plowing snow. Philip Wayne Higgins, 57, of the 4400 block of Declaration Circle in Belcamp, was found Monday, 10 to 20 feet from his county truck at the former Gunpowder Falls Golf Course in Kingsville, police said. He worked for the Property Management Division, which maintains county properties.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
As "tractorcade" protests go, the demonstration of farmers and farm vehicles in Annapolis on Tuesday morning was a modest affair with a handful of old-fashioned tractors and some equally well-worn grievances. The timetable may have been a little off, too, since the protesters' collective ire was directed at a law that the General Assembly passed last year. Nevertheless, the group of farmers assembled at the State House to support legislation that would repeal the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 - or, as most people know it, Gov. Martin O'Malley's septics bill.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
State highway crews have an answer to whatever winter brings our way this year: a snow-chewing, salt-spewing monster truck capable of plowing two full lanes at once. The truck is the latest weapon in the 2,400-vehicle arsenal of the State Highway Administration, the agency charged with clearing as much blacktop and concrete as the equivalent of seven round trips to Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland. Officials showed off an array of flake-fighting equipment Monday at its annual show-and-tell at SHA's Statewide Operations Center in Hanover.
NEWS
February 15, 2007
In a first major test against winter's wrath, Baltimore-area snow crews didn't distinguish themselves. Even toward the end of yesterday morning's rush hour, some major arteries in the city, such as the Jones Falls Expressway, York Road and Russell Street, were barely passable - making for a grumpy start to the day. Maybe we've all gotten a bit out of practice. The last significant snowstorm was last February, when 13 inches fell. Local transportation and public works departments had been preparing all winter, stocking up on salt and making sure that spreaders, plows and support vehicles were in good working order.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
The U.S. is outsourcing its food supply. Imports have nearly doubled since 2001, and the big growth is not in foods that don't grow here - coffee, for instance, or bananas - but in crops that are American staples. The change raises questions about food safety, and about the wisdom of entrusting the nation's food security to overseas producers. Consider garlic. The U.S. is one of the world's major garlic growers. It is also an important exporter of garlic. Yet American imports of garlic have been skyrocketing.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
The Maryland Senate spent Wednesday afternoon plowing through the state budget bill and a companion measure shifting part of the cost of teacher pensions from the state to the counties, turning back Republican attempts to amend the legislation. Late in the afternoon, after giving preliminary approval to both measures, senators turned to the big fight of the week: consideration of a revenue bill that includes a $416 million increase in state income tax rates. If that measure and the budget companion bill don't pass, almost $750 million in contingent cuts in the budget bill would take effect.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
In Baltimore, road crews were starting to wrap up salting and plowing operations, with most roads expected to be done by 11 a.m. “It's turning into a rain event,” said Adrienne Barnes, a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Transportation. She said crews will be working throughout the day and night, but they will be hitting targeted, problem areas, instead of cruising the streets. Barnes said that all primary and secondary roads were salted and plowed by this morning and as of 10 a.m. crews were responding to individual calls for service or complaints.
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