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NEWS
February 10, 2010
My neighbors dug our entire city street only to find that the main street at the end had yet to be plowed. Some people have driven on it and smashed down the snow, but there are serious ruts and holes. I'm not expecting miracles on the side streets, and I know the crews must have a lot going on, but really Harford Road is still unplowed??!! How can that be? My husband and I made it out in my SUV today, thanks to neighbors who pushed us until we were able to move on our own -- and while we were out we didn't see a single plow, and the streets were clearly not salted.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
For Rick Farrell, all this winter's snow and ice have meant about $1 million in contract work with the city of Baltimore — the welcome return on an investment inspired by 2010's "Snowmaggedon. " Farrell, of Ellicott City, incorporated his commercial power-washing business, Columbia-based Corporate Maintenance Group, in 2004, focusing on shopping centers and parking garages and eventually providing sweeping and other services for the same facilities. Then the "hellacious back-to-back snow storms" of 2010 hit, and the company took a chance, he said — renting every plow and salt-spreader it could get its hands on, installing them on its trucks and picking up work.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | February 13, 2010
As plows dug into neighborhood streets in Annapolis on Friday - most for the first time since two storms dropped 42 inches of snow on the city in a week - officials began to hunt for places to put it. "We are literally running out of space to pile snow," said city spokesman Phill McGowan. "We were piling it at the boat ramp at Truxtun Park, but that's almost full." He said Mayor Josh Cohen and other city officials called business owners and owners of vacant lots starting Friday morning, looking for areas in and near the city.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
When Rob Rogers woke up the morning of Dec. 8 and looked at an ominous weather forecast predicting several inches of snow or the threat of freezing rain, he knew exactly where he wanted to be. The 24-year-old Hampden resident rushed to his computer, navigated to Stubhub.com and saw that ticket prices for that afternoon's game between the Ravens and Minnesota Vikings were dropping. He snapped up tickets for himself and three friends and threw on long underwear, warm clothes, a winter jacket and, of course, his No. 82 Torrey Smith jersey and was off to M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 15, 2010
Friday was a turning point for Ron Furman. That day, he decided to become a vigilante plower. The owner of Max's Taphouse in Fells Point was walking in the neighborhood when he said he slipped and fell on ice at Lancaster Street and Broadway. "I almost broke my neck," Furman said. "I just said that was it and went up and got the tractor." The Upperco resident said he plowed out side streets and parking spaces through the weekend as well as Monday morning, starting at 5 a.m. He said he decided to take matters into his own hands, rather than complaining that it's someone else's responsibility to get the job done.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Larry Carson and Patrick Gilbert and Larry Carson,Staff Writers | March 19, 1993
An article in yesterday's editions on Baltimore County snow removal reported incorrectly the retirement date of former county highway chief Saverio Cortese. It should have said that he retired earlier this month.The Sun regrets the errors.When Shirley Merrill looked out the windows of her Randallstown home Monday, she saw streets plowed to the right of her and streets plowed to the left of her.But her street, Eastman Road, wasn't plowed at all. And she wondered why."It just doesn't make any sense that other streets around me were plowed and just my street wasn't," she said.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1996
At least some Carroll residents seemed to have been pushed past their limits during the weekend, after digging out from more than 30 inches of snow.Police were called to two altercations involving residents who fought back when areas they had cleared of snow were filled again.About 3:30 p.m. Friday, a snowplow driver was injured at Oakmont Green in Hampstead when a resident's driveway was plowed shut, police said.Police said Kevin Hand, 41, accidentally pushed snow into the driveway while the resident was clearing it. The resident reportedly became irate and swung his shovel at the plow, breaking its window and damaging the door.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
Forget the grassy knoll. In the Baltimore area, our conspiracy theories converge on the snowy streets, as our cabin-fevered imaginations develop endless scenarios for who gets plowed and why.We think it's political, a nefarious system based on who you are, who you know and who you've irked. We think it's linked to class, with the rich neighborhoods in front of the poor ones. We think it depends on if your precinct voted "right" in the last election. We think it's racist, no matter which race we are. And we're sure it really helps to have neighbors with names like Hackerman, Knott, Meyerhoff and Paterakis.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
Robert Jackson, a gentleman born in 1894, begins many anecdotes by saying, "It's a long story." In syncopation, he moves his long, beautiful hands to shape the memory. Within moments, the turn of the 20th century comes into view.It was 1903."I was 9 years old. I was raised in the Lord, and I came out of the woods in Georgia to live in Vincent, Ala. I worked in the fields with a mule and a plow. Sunup to sundown. I worked for Mr. Logan. He was a white man and treated me like I was his son. He had four sons of his own. We all plowed."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 24, 1996
A column in yesterday's Maryland section misstated Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's middle name, Lidell.The Sun regrets the error.Submitted for your approval is one Kurt Louis Schmoke, beleaguered mayor of a large East Coast city. Recently re-elected by a large majority, the mayor soon became afflicted with delusions of grandeur and competence, leading him to a bend in the road that leads to: The Twilight Zone.Rod Serling, where are you now that you're really needed? "The Twilight Zone" creator and writer might have written just such an opening -- albeit somewhat better -- for an episode about the beloved mayor of Charm City -- clearly living in a parallel universe where 90 percent of the streets were plowed after the recent blizzard.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
On Sunday morning, I ventured out to do my grocery shopping before the snow storm arrived. Being a native of Western New York, I favor the familiar offerings of Wegmans, so I have little difficulty justifying the drive from Baltimore to Columbia every week. As I was leaving the store, the snow had begun in Columbia, and I anticipated some slow going for the drive home. I progressed up Route 29, and the snow became heavier to the point of obscuring the lane lines. People from snowy areas would not call this heavy snow since visibility was still fair, but it was persistent and a healthy amount creating challenging driving conditions.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Baltimore County officials on Wednesday released the identity of a county worker who died after emergency responders were called to a former county golf course earlier this week, and crash investigators are probing what happened to him as he was plowing snow. Philip Wayne Higgins, 57, of the 4400 block of Declaration Circle in Belcamp, was found Monday, 10 to 20 feet from his county truck at the former Gunpowder Falls Golf Course in Kingsville, police said. He worked for the Property Management Division, which maintains county properties.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
As "tractorcade" protests go, the demonstration of farmers and farm vehicles in Annapolis on Tuesday morning was a modest affair with a handful of old-fashioned tractors and some equally well-worn grievances. The timetable may have been a little off, too, since the protesters' collective ire was directed at a law that the General Assembly passed last year. Nevertheless, the group of farmers assembled at the State House to support legislation that would repeal the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 - or, as most people know it, Gov. Martin O'Malley's septics bill.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
State highway crews have an answer to whatever winter brings our way this year: a snow-chewing, salt-spewing monster truck capable of plowing two full lanes at once. The truck is the latest weapon in the 2,400-vehicle arsenal of the State Highway Administration, the agency charged with clearing as much blacktop and concrete as the equivalent of seven round trips to Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland. Officials showed off an array of flake-fighting equipment Monday at its annual show-and-tell at SHA's Statewide Operations Center in Hanover.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
The Maryland Senate spent Wednesday afternoon plowing through the state budget bill and a companion measure shifting part of the cost of teacher pensions from the state to the counties, turning back Republican attempts to amend the legislation. Late in the afternoon, after giving preliminary approval to both measures, senators turned to the big fight of the week: consideration of a revenue bill that includes a $416 million increase in state income tax rates. If that measure and the budget companion bill don't pass, almost $750 million in contingent cuts in the budget bill would take effect.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
In Baltimore, road crews were starting to wrap up salting and plowing operations, with most roads expected to be done by 11 a.m. “It's turning into a rain event,” said Adrienne Barnes, a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Transportation. She said crews will be working throughout the day and night, but they will be hitting targeted, problem areas, instead of cruising the streets. Barnes said that all primary and secondary roads were salted and plowed by this morning and as of 10 a.m. crews were responding to individual calls for service or complaints.
NEWS
December 4, 2001
Howard County residents won't have to venture out into the frigid landscape to find out whether the way is clear to school or work or shopping. Instead, they can warm up their personal computers and see not only where the nearest plow is, but also which nearby streets have been salted, plowed or both. Using software developed by a Columbia company over the past several years, county officials said yesterday, they are poised to become the first local government in Maryland to offer residents current information on street conditions during snow or other storms.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Sherrie Ruhl and Larry Carson and Sherrie Ruhl,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers James M. Coram, Tanya Jones, Dan Morse, Shanon D. Murray, Dennis O'Brien, Alisa Samuels and Andrea F. Siegel contributed to this article | January 11, 1996
Baltimore and Harford counties reported major progress yesterday in reclaiming roads from the blizzard, but both jurisdictions still were having trouble removing drifts in rural sections.Thanks to yesterday's milder weather, all streets in Baltimore County's urban areas were scheduled to be plowed by dawn today. But many small roads "up the country," in northern, rural communities, remained closed by drifts as high as 10 feet, officials said.Road crews were attacking the toughest areas with large front-end loaders and specialized digging equipment instead of plows, county highway chief C. Richard Moore said.
NEWS
February 2, 2011
When the mayor summons her best and brightest transportation officials, it isn't for an update on snow removal in the neighborhoods, to discuss technology and workflows that would enable more efficient service delivery, or even to check the status of the backlog of projects citywide. Rather, it's to find out if her $8 million race track is on schedule for Labor Day. Baltimore is spending the bulk of its transportation stimulus funds on Pratt and Light streets — not to make them more attractive gateways to the Inner Harbor but to create a race course so Baltimore Racing Development can hold an IndyCar race.
NEWS
January 31, 2011
I couldn't agree more with Frank Diventi ( "Once again, the county beats the city on snow removal," Jan. 30). I, too, live in Northeast Baltimore, about a fifth of a mile from the county line. It has now been four days since the storm and still no city plow. Had it not been for a good samaritan neighbor with a small plow, we would still be snow-bound. There have been many ocassions when all the neighbors got out and shoveled the street, something I can no longer do since I now have a heart condition.
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