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By Elizabeth Shogren and Elizabeth Shogren,Los Angeles Times | January 22, 1992
MOSCOW -- The plotters of the August coup here had elaborate plans to turn back the clock to a time just before former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev came to power, and they were prepared to launch massive Stalinist repressions, Russian prosecutors said yesterday.The prosecutors also said that the plotters thought they eventually would win Mr. Gorbachev's cooperation in reversing the liberalization trend he had begun.In their 4 1/2 -month investigation of the failed coup, prosecutors said, they found 100 documents describing the plotters' intention to re-create the Soviet society of 1984, when political prisoners were commonplace, the news media were controlled by the Communist Party, and elections were inconsequential because there was only one name on the ballot for each job."
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
With his fiancee seven months pregnant and his bail bonds business struggling to get the insurance it needed, Ralph Hall received a voice mail from someone offering to help him out. On a midsummer evening, Hall drove to the KIPP Ujima Village Academy on Greenspring Avenue to try to make a deal. He met his contact and they talked inside Hall's car for just over five minutes, video of the scene shows, before the other man pulled out a .38-caliber revolver and shot Hall twice, killing him, according to prosecutors.
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NEWS
By Russell Baker | August 28, 1991
I WAS ONCE involved in a Broadway musical that never got to Broadway on account of folding in Toronto. It was a humbling experience. A lot of talented, hard-working dancers and singers who had been anticipating their big break were suddenly thrown out of work through some fault of my own. A large sum of money may or may not have been lost. Since theater bookkeeping is one of the most creative arts, it was hard to tell.Most humbling of all, though, was the discovery that I was the only person in the United States and Canada who didn't know how to write a successful Broadway musical.
NEWS
March 26, 2010
- Osama bin Laden threatened in a new message released Thursday to kill any Americans al-Qaida captures if the U.S. executes the self-professed mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks or other al-Qaida suspects. In the 74-second audiotape aired on Al-Jazeera television, the al-Qaida leader explicitly mentions Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who was captured in Pakistan in 2003. He is the most senior al-Qaida operative in U.S. custody and is currently detained at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 23, 1991
THE WORLD may have to wait for the courtroom confessions or eventual memoirs of the key plotters in this week's attempted coup in the Soviet Union to get clearer insights into what caused their conspiracy to fail -- and fail so ignominiously.Several things went terribly wrong for the junta -- but wonderfully right for the supporters of democracy.First, they found a rock-steady and audacious champion in Yeltsin. He must now, beyond any question, be recognized as his country's pre-eminent political figure.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 23, 1991
Too bad the coup, the final flaring of a political faith now nearly extinguished, did not end with the plotters fleeing Russia by train from St. Petersburg's Finland Station, where Lenin arrived in 1917. The plotters were (in Lenin's phrase) useful idiots. Because of what they did, Mikhail Gorbachev cannot again be what he was, a retrograde force temporizing with a bankrupt system and retarding the advance toward democratization and economic rationality.Mr. Gorbachev now has the prominence of a ship's figurehead.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 14, 1993
NEW YORK -- Under extraordinary security, the trial of four of the seven men charged in the bombing of the World Trade Center opens today in federal court in Manhattan, promising the first comprehensive picture of a crime that shook American complacency about terrorism.After almost seven months of investigation, prosecutors have concluded that the plotters had sought to collapse a 110-story trade center tower, killing thousands.The defendants -- Mahmud Abouhalima, 33, an Egyptian cabdriver, and three men with Palestinian roots, Ahmad M. Ajaj, 27, Nidal A. Ayyad, 25, and Mohammed Salameh, 25 -- contend that the charges are flawed by false identifications and that the ,, government is putting Islam on trial.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY AND AAMER MADHANI and TOM HUNDLEY AND AAMER MADHANI,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 12, 2006
LONDON -- One was a well-known student activist at London Metropolitan University whom a friend described as a moderate. Another worked in security at Heathrow airport. Another had a job in a pizza parlor. The youngest of the alleged plotters was only 17. They lived seemingly ordinary lives on ordinary streets in the immigrant neighborhoods of London, Birmingham and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire. Friends and neighbors could have no idea they were planning murder on a mass scale. But little more than a month after Britain marked the first anniversary of the July 7 suicide attacks that killed 52 London commuters, the nation was slowly coming to grips with reports that another, even more ambitious network had taken root in their midst.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | July 21, 1992
BERLIN -- In the brilliant July sun, the day lilies and the gladiolas blaze red-orange before the memorial plaque in the courtyard of what was once the War Ministry of Nazi Germany.And you could wonder if it was a bright, pleasant summer's day when the men whose names are on the plaque tried to assassinate Adolf Hitler on July 20, 1944.They failed. And against the wall of this courtyard about where the flowers are now, just after midnight on July 21, some of the leaders of the attempt were shot: Col. Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, Gen. Friedrich Olbricht, Col. Albrecht von Quirheim and Lt. Werner von Haeften.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | November 23, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A U.S. missile strike may have killed a Pakistani-British man who was implicated in a plot to blow up trans-Atlantic airliners, Pakistani intelligence officials said yesterday. Rashid Rauf, who has been a fugitive since escaping from Pakistani custody in December, was thought to have been among five militants killed in the strike near the Afghan border, the officials said. Pakistani news media also reported the death, citing security sources. Pakistan's government confirmed that Rauf and a Saudi militant called Abu Zubair al-Masri were the apparent targets of the missile in North Waziristan in the tribal region that lies next to Afghanistan.
NEWS
November 24, 2009
K halid Sheikh Mohammed and his co-defendants have announced through their lawyers that they intend to plead not guilty to charges of conspiring to perpetrate the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York and the Washington area. But Mr. Mohammed and his henchmen aren't denying their involvement in the worst terrorist strike on U.S. soil in American history; on the contrary, they're boasting of their intention to turn the trial in New York into a media circus that will enable them to preach their philosophy of violent jihad to a worldwide audience.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | November 23, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A U.S. missile strike may have killed a Pakistani-British man who was implicated in a plot to blow up trans-Atlantic airliners, Pakistani intelligence officials said yesterday. Rashid Rauf, who has been a fugitive since escaping from Pakistani custody in December, was thought to have been among five militants killed in the strike near the Afghan border, the officials said. Pakistani news media also reported the death, citing security sources. Pakistan's government confirmed that Rauf and a Saudi militant called Abu Zubair al-Masri were the apparent targets of the missile in North Waziristan in the tribal region that lies next to Afghanistan.
NEWS
By TOM HUNDLEY AND AAMER MADHANI and TOM HUNDLEY AND AAMER MADHANI,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 12, 2006
LONDON -- One was a well-known student activist at London Metropolitan University whom a friend described as a moderate. Another worked in security at Heathrow airport. Another had a job in a pizza parlor. The youngest of the alleged plotters was only 17. They lived seemingly ordinary lives on ordinary streets in the immigrant neighborhoods of London, Birmingham and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire. Friends and neighbors could have no idea they were planning murder on a mass scale. But little more than a month after Britain marked the first anniversary of the July 7 suicide attacks that killed 52 London commuters, the nation was slowly coming to grips with reports that another, even more ambitious network had taken root in their midst.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The alleged mastermind of a plot to bomb train tunnels connecting New York City and New Jersey also discussed blowing up subway cars in Manhattan, and even toyed with the idea of setting a wildfire in California, U.S. counterterrorism officials said yesterday. U.S. and Lebanese officials said they learned about the discussions between Assem Hammoud and several co-conspirators by monitoring e-mail traffic on a Web site used by Islamic militants, and by scouring Hammoud's computer and his Beirut, Lebanon, home and office after his arrest April 27. Such discussions, U.S. authorities said, suggest that Hammoud and up to seven other accomplices were still searching for ways to strike the United States when the plot was disrupted.
NEWS
By DAVID SAVAGE and DAVID SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The only person prosecuted for the worst terrorist attack in American history, Zacarias Moussaoui, was spared a death sentence yesterday because some jurors concluded that he had little to do with the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Meanwhile. the two key planners of the al-Qaida plot, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and Ramzi Binalshibh, have not been prosecuted, even though they have been in U.S. custody for more than three years. That conundrum results from the Bush administration's approach to combating terrorism, which leads to public prosecutions of bit players while the main plotters are held for secret questioning.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Lane Harvey Brown and Scott Shane and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 2004
A 26-year-old Pennsylvania businessman in Iraq to help with reconstruction was kidnapped and beheaded by Islamic militants who said they were avenging U.S. soldiers' mistreatment of Iraqi prisoners, according to a gruesome video of the murder posted yesterday on the Web site of a militant group tied to al-Qaida. The video attributed the killing of Nick Berg to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who has emerged as a leading plotter of terrorist attacks on Americans and their allies in Iraq and elsewhere.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1994
MOSCOW -- The lower house of parliament set the stage yesterday for a major showdown with President Boris N. Yeltsin by declaring an amnesty for the organizers of the failed 1991 coup as well as the ringleaders of the armed uprising of last October.The amnesty vote was virtually the first important piece of business for Russia's new legislature, and it promises to resurrect the inter-branch power struggle that Mr. Yeltsin had hoped was now behind him.The president's aides reacted furiously to the vote in the Duma, or lower house.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The alleged mastermind of a plot to bomb train tunnels connecting New York City and New Jersey also discussed blowing up subway cars in Manhattan, and even toyed with the idea of setting a wildfire in California, U.S. counterterrorism officials said yesterday. U.S. and Lebanese officials said they learned about the discussions between Assem Hammoud and several co-conspirators by monitoring e-mail traffic on a Web site used by Islamic militants, and by scouring Hammoud's computer and his Beirut, Lebanon, home and office after his arrest April 27. Such discussions, U.S. authorities said, suggest that Hammoud and up to seven other accomplices were still searching for ways to strike the United States when the plot was disrupted.
SPORTS
By Doug Beizer and Doug Beizer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
Massive 65-foot yachts with twin staterooms and hardwood floors may draw the biggest oohs and aahs at this year's boat shows, but for an increasing number, it's all about the smaller stuff. While the temporary piers in Annapolis will be packed with boats, the nearby tents will have all the latest in electronics, such as handheld global positioning system (GPS) devices and full-color, electronic chart plotters. "There are a lot of gadgets and electronics involved in boating. I think that's one of the reasons people love their boats so much," said Rick Franke, a spokesman for the boat shows.
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