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By Los Angeles Times | May 28, 1995
MANILA, Philippines -- They called the project Bojinka, "the explosion."The plan was devastating in its complexity and technical brilliance. If it had not been foiled, it might have been the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history.Project Bojinka was a plan to blow up 11 U.S. airliners over the Pacific in a day of rage at the United States.According to investigators, it called for five Muslim terrorists to plant virtually undetectable bombs aboard the planes, all jumbo jets, in an intricately synchronized plan that had the bombers changing planes as many as four times in a day.The U.S. government has accused Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, the Pakistani suspected of engineering the New York World Trade Center bombing, of being the mastermind behind the Bojinka plot.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The founder of a Baltimore County-based company that provided insurance to nightclubs and bars who was previously charged with misleading regulators now faces additional charges. The new charges of wire fraud and money laundering mean Jeffrey Cohen, the former CEO of Indemnity Insurance Corp., could face a stiffer sentence if convicted. Officials said he could be sentenced to an additional 120 years imprisonment if convicted on all counts. He was previously facing 15 years in prison for each of five counts of making false statements to an insurance regulator.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Edelstein and McClatchy-Tribune | December 24, 2009
A TV show about a group in their 20s who rent a summer share on the Jersey Shore. Hilarity, hookups and high jinks ensue. Been there, seen that. A decade and a half before MTV's controversial "Jersey Shore," there was "Down the Shore," a Fox sitcom that was a lot less controversial. A lot less funny, too. The comedy about three guys (lifelong pals) and three women (co-workers at a Manhattan ad agency) in their 20s sharing a house in the fictional town of Belmar Bay debuted in June 1992 and lasted for parts of two seasons.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A man convicted in a 2010 fatal shooting at a Hess gas station in exchange for $9,000 argued unsuccessfully that he should get a new trial because the judge in his case had once been the target in a similar scheme. The Court of Special Appeals upheld Walter P. Bishop Jr.'s conviction in an opinion announced Tuesday. Bishop, now 32, was convicted and sentenced to two consecutive life sentences plus 20 years for shooting William "Ray" Porter at a Joppa Road gas station in Towson on March 1, 2010.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and The Washington Post | January 20, 2010
A 20-year-old from Bethesda linked to a plot to try to kill then-presidential-candidate Barack Obama was sentenced to 61 months in prison Tuesday by a federal judge who said he had gone well beyond innocent role-playing. "Nobody was assassinated. Nobody was wounded. Nobody was injured. But you were on the cusp," U.S. District Judge Peter J. Messitte told Collin McKenzie-Gude. The judge technically sentenced McKenzie-Gude on his earlier guilty plea of storing bomb-making chemicals in his bedroom.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
The bizarre plot federal law enforcement officials described Tuesday in which elements of the Iranian government are accused of trying to blow up Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S. with explosives planted in a Washington restaurant sounds like something out of a spy novel. FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III acknowledged as much at the news conference announcing the arrest of one of the alleged conspirators. Yet if true, the charges represent an unprecedented and intolerable provocation by a regime long known for exporting terrorism, and they demand the strongest possible response - short of direct military action - from the U.S. and the international community.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | October 28, 2010
Federal law enforcement authorities arrested a Northern Virginia man Wednesday in connection with an alleged plot to carry out terrorist bombings at stations in the Washington Metro system. Farooque Ahmed, 34, of Ashburn conspired with people he believed to be al-Qaida operatives to bomb the Arlington Cemetery, Pentagon City, Crystal City and Court House stations, according to a federal indictment. An Obama administration official said that Ahmed, a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Pakistan, first drew the attention of law enforcement officials by seeking to obtain unspecified materials.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
If you like musicals packed with songs delivered by a vibrant cast boasting a certified star at the helm, all surrounded by cool stagecraft, then hasten to the National Theatre for the pre-Broadway tryout of “If/Then.” If you're more interested in truly distinctive music and a totally straightforward plot, then you may well  be disappointed in this new venture by the creators of the Tony Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning “Next to Normal” that...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
Antonio Martinez, who is accused of masterminding a failed jihadist plot to bomb a Catonsville military center, pleaded not guilty Friday to a two-count indictment charging him with the attempted murder of federal employees and the attempted use of a "weapon of mass destruction. " The 21-year-old Baltimore man, who has been in custody since his arrest a month ago, could receive life in prison if convicted on both counts, as well as a fine of up to $500,000. Martinez, who prefers to be known as Muhammad Hussain, confessed to plotting the attack after it was foiled Dec. 8 by investigators posing as accomplices, prosecutor Christine Manuelian said in court last month.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 1995
MINNEAPOLIS -- In a flurry of legal motions filed late yesterday, attorneys in the murder-for-hire case against Qubilah Shabazz profiled an indecisive woman who talked bluntly about murder, then backed out of an alleged plot just weeks before she was indicted on charges of conspiring to kill Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.The release of transcripts from FBI wiretaps and a purported confession from Ms. Shabazz, 34, the second eldest daughter of Malcolm X, provided the first inner details of a case that has flared into renewed controversy over the government's reliance on criminal informants.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A Parkville man was convicted Monday of conspiring to ship industrial components to Iran in violation of the U.S. trade embargo on that country, the U.S. attorney's office announced. After a two-week trial in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, a jury found Ali Saboonchi, 34, guilty of one count of conspiracy and seven counts of illegally transporting U.S.-manufactured goods and services to Iran, the federal prosecutor's office said. The United States has outlawed commerce with Iran since 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
I can't remember the last time real-life events recontextualized a work of fiction for me the way Israel's incursion into Gaza has done with "The Honorable Woman" this month. When I first started watching the BBC-made mini-series that starts at 10 p.m. Thursday on the Sundance Channel, I liked almost everything about it -- except Maggie Gyllenhaal. And that was a big problem, because she is the star, playing an Anglo-Israeli businesswoman, Nessa Stein, heavily involved in Middle East philanthropy and politics.
BUSINESS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The founder of an embattled Sparks-based insurance company appears to have been plotting to kill a Delaware judge overseeing the liquidation of his business, recording himself on a trip to scout out his targets and acquiring a cache of weapons, federal authorities allege in court filings. Jeffrey B. Cohen, 39, of Reisterstown was arrested last month after he was indicted on charges that he schemed to make it appear that his company, Indemnity Insurance Corp., which insured bars and nightclubs, had millions of dollars in cash it did not possess.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Who's winning the “Game of Thrones”? At this point, there's really only one correct answer: Lord Petyr Baelish, that oft-overlooked advisor to kings, better known as “Littlefinger.” He's sparked a great war that's thrown three prominent families of Westeros - the Lannisters, Starks and Baratheons - into a death struggle. He's murdered the king. And, now, he's claimed control of The Eyrie stronghold, by killing the very woman he manipulated into starting the war in the first place.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
The Columbia Triathlon Association - one of the country's premier endurance race organizers - expects to be taking event registrations again and offering reassurance to nervous athletes on its website next week after drafting a plan to put the organization on sound financial footing. "Races will all be open…We're happy about that, " said Todd Jennings, chairman of the board of directors for the 30-year-old nonprofit that has helped raised millions for charity and stages the EagleMan, a 70.3-mile triathlon in Cambridge, a qualifying event for the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
A Baltimore jury convicted two men on murder, extortion and false imprisonment charges Wednesday for abducting a man and taking his girlfriend's ransom money before killing him and dumping his body in the Patapsco River. Eric Pendergrass went missing in early 2009 and turned up dead soon after. The jury convicted Donta Vaughn, 37, and Darryl Nichols, 38, of the abduction plot after about a day of deliberation. Sherrell Ferguson, 32, who helped obtain the ransom payments, according to court records, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder earlier this month.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- FBI agents have been told by an Iraqi bein held in Kuwait that he led an attempt to assassinate former President George Bush last month on behalf of the Iraqi government, U.S. officials said yesterday.The officials said that the man had admitted to working with the Iraqi intelligence service and that other members of the 10-member team had admitted from a Kuwaiti jail to having received Iraqi government assistance.The officials were the first to describe the extensive jailhouse interviews since they began a week ago. While the FBI is not yet satisfied that it has established proof, the officials said the initial findings from the investigation had strengthened the view within the administration that the Iraqi government was behind the plot.
NEWS
By William Safire | October 15, 1991
Washington -- THE FULL story of the conspiracy to blackmail Clarence Thomas into withdrawing will not be told until after the Senate votes on his confirmation this evening. But the outlines of the plot to use Anita Hill to bring him down are clear.Ricki Seidman, aide to that defender of womanhood, Sen. Ted Kennedy, and James Brudney, aide to Sen. Howard Metzenbaum, were tipped off by the legion of liberal activists digging for dirt that Professor Hill harbored a secret grudge against Thomas.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Tuesday sentencing of a Howard County teen convicted of terrorism offenses in Philadelphia has been postponed, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office there. Mohammad Hassan Khalid pleaded guilty to working to pursue a terrorist plot in Europe with a Pennsylvania woman who went by the name Jihad Jane and other people. Khalid mailed stolen documents, tried to raise money and translated extremist propaganda, according to federal prosecutors. His sentencing had been postponed several times and his attorney said last week he was seeking further delay so his client could undergo further psychological testing.
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