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By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | December 8, 1996
A KISS is still a kiss, sweetheart, but pliers may never be the same.In recent years, manufacturers like Sears and Black & Decker have been rethinking traditional tools and coming up with new and improved versions, or with new devices altogether to perform traditional -- and some nontraditional -- tasks.In 1993, Sears introduced its Craftsman Professional Robogrips, a type of carefully engineered, hand-friendly pliers that are spring-loaded and self-adjusting. "As of early this year, they became the best-selling tool in the world," said Mike Mangan, of MKM Communications in Chicago, a home-improvement consultant for Sears.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 16, 2007
What to get for the multisport outdoors person on your list who has one of everything? How about Wenger's Ranger 73 Swiss Army knife ($85; wengerna .com), a multiple-use tool that looks the part and plays it, too. The Model 73 has a tough, 4-inch locking blade, a tough pair of needle-nose pliers with wire cutter, two screwdrivers, a wire stripper, an awl, a cap opener and a corkscrew. (Nine other models have different blade and tool configurations, so check the inventory online.) The package is wrapped in a tough, black housing that protects the tools and is easy to grip.
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FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 4, 1993
Putting together a basic tool collection is one of the first orders of business for new homeowners and would-be do-it-yourselfers.Selecting the correct tools for the basic kit can save time and effort when routine home repair and maintenance problems occur.The tools described in this column comprise what I think is an excellent basic kit. The entire collection can be bought for $125 to $150. Additional tools and accessories can be added as they are needed.A cordless drill-driver is the key component of the tool kit and, at $40 or more, the most-expensive of the tools.
NEWS
By Jia-Rui Chong and Jia-Rui Chong,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
Astronauts successfully stitched together tears in a sheet of solar panels on the International Space Station early yesterday morning in a seven-hour operation that was one of the most difficult ever attempted in space. Spacewalker Scott E. Parazynski snipped a guide wire that had snagged on the long, wing-like solar array and another wire that had gotten tangled in the damaged area. He also laced five makeshift braces made of aluminum, wire and insulating tape - dubbed "cuff links" by the crew - into the panels to stabilize them.
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | May 9, 1992
Nothing pleases Mom more than being remembered on Mother's Day with a gift from the heart. Here's a fun jewelry-making project from old junk jewelry. Once the kids get started, plan on making a designer's collection to give to grandmothers, aunts and other special women your children remember on Mother's Day.Cover a worktable with newspaper, and gather the following items: junk jewelry, pliers, scissors, cardboard, velvet or solid-color fabric scraps, glue...
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 8, 1991
Of all the fix-it jobs on the face of the earth, few are more rewarding than repairing a kid's bike.Fixing a kid's bike restores order to the universe. A small body once reluctantly at rest is transformed into an exuberant body in motion.Where once was sulking immobility there is suddenly joyful motion.Most of the repairs jobs I've done on my kids' bicycles have been minor. I straighten a bent handle bar. Tighten a loose wheel nut. Replace a reflector.But the other day I undertook a big bike job, for me -- I shortened a bicycle chain.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
Man, 38, charged in restaurant break-in A Severn man has been charged with breaking into a fast-food restaurant through a front window and stealing soft drinks, Anne Arundel County police said. Police who went to Cluck U Chicken at 20 E. Ordnance Road in Glen Burnie after the alarm went off about 5:45 a.m. Thursday found the front window shattered. Officers arrested Randal Carlton Harper, 38, of the 600 block of Queenstown Road. He had in his possession beverages taken from the restaurant and drugs, police said.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 16, 2007
What to get for the multisport outdoors person on your list who has one of everything? How about Wenger's Ranger 73 Swiss Army knife ($85; wengerna .com), a multiple-use tool that looks the part and plays it, too. The Model 73 has a tough, 4-inch locking blade, a tough pair of needle-nose pliers with wire cutter, two screwdrivers, a wire stripper, an awl, a cap opener and a corkscrew. (Nine other models have different blade and tool configurations, so check the inventory online.) The package is wrapped in a tough, black housing that protects the tools and is easy to grip.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1994
The director of the Patuxent Institution has launched an investigation aided by the state police to determine how an inmate got his hands on the tools to cut through steel bars and a security fence, and why the escape Wednesday went unnoticed by corrections officers."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | April 26, 1994
Toward dusk the other day, as we were turning into a creek near the mouth of the Severn River after a two-hour shakedown cruise, a man in a 12-foot tin boat raised an orange life jacket and waved for us to stop.He and his son, a 10-year-old who sat quietly and straight-faced toward the bow, had made their way down the Severn in the tin boat on what had seemed a great parent-child adventure for a warm spring day.Upon reaching the mouth of the river at Tolly Point, they hadturned and headed for home, intent on getting back upriver before dark.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
Man, 38, charged in restaurant break-in A Severn man has been charged with breaking into a fast-food restaurant through a front window and stealing soft drinks, Anne Arundel County police said. Police who went to Cluck U Chicken at 20 E. Ordnance Road in Glen Burnie after the alarm went off about 5:45 a.m. Thursday found the front window shattered. Officers arrested Randal Carlton Harper, 38, of the 600 block of Queenstown Road. He had in his possession beverages taken from the restaurant and drugs, police said.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 16, 2007
Any weekend that is free of plumbing problems is a good one. Last Sunday night, I went to bed with the cheery thought that I had made it through another weekend without having to pick up the pliers. That, it turned out, was mistaken joy. Late Sunday night, while I was sleeping, the kitchen faucet, the best faucet in the house, started spewing water from its base. My wife noticed the problem, wrapped a tea towel around the base of the faucet to soak up the water, and told me about the trouble Monday morning at breakfast.
NEWS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2005
Jacquelyn Stephens Shatzer Goldsmith/designer, Towson Age --49 Years in business --27 years Salary --$32,000 a year plus yearly distributions that range from $4,000 to $8,000 How she got started --Shatzer majored in art at Towson University but left after three years to complete a one-year jewelry design and repair program at the former Bowman Technical School in Lancaster, Pa. She went to work as an apprentice at the former H.C. Garthe Co., a...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 17, 2004
I HAD HEARD other baby boomers speak of this time, and now it was mine - time to help the Greatest Generation move to the next horizon. So on a gloomy day, about a week before the movers are to come, I stand in the old man's workshop, lined floor to ceiling with steel and wooden tools, some of them handmade, from his 50 years as the family's chief handyman. I hold a heavy, gritty, oily object in my hands - a belt grinder - and the old man, who can no longer lift the thing himself, announces that it must go to the new house in the retirement community.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 16, 2002
TOMORROW IS St. Patrick's Day, so this weekend virtually anyone can slap an "O" in front of his name and pretend to be Irish. Since my grandparents came from Ireland's County Kerry, I feel qualified to dish out blarney with the best of them. In that vein I offer these accounts of when I have been blessed with the "luck of the Irish." Cuisinart's Wake: It is a sad time in any home when an appliance dies. Such was the case this week when the food processor gave up the ghost, or so it appeared.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 9, 2000
I FIXED our home's "singing door" recently. The song came from a loose pane of glass in the back door. Anytime a trash truck or a throaty motorcycle rolled down the alley, the glass sounded its clarion call. It wasn't planned to function that way. But a few years back, when I repaired a broken pane in the door, the replacement glass that I used was slightly too small. The home repair books advise that when calculating the size of a replacement glass, you should hold a tape measure between the outside edges of the space, record the numbers for both width and height, then subtract 1/8 of an inch from each measurement.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 17, 2004
I HAD HEARD other baby boomers speak of this time, and now it was mine - time to help the Greatest Generation move to the next horizon. So on a gloomy day, about a week before the movers are to come, I stand in the old man's workshop, lined floor to ceiling with steel and wooden tools, some of them handmade, from his 50 years as the family's chief handyman. I hold a heavy, gritty, oily object in my hands - a belt grinder - and the old man, who can no longer lift the thing himself, announces that it must go to the new house in the retirement community.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 29, 1994
Every so often you have to swallow your pride and call theplumber. Calling the plumber is an admission of defeat. It is an acknowledgment that no matter how many home-repair books you read, there are times when pipes get the better of you. My plumber, however, seems to enjoy our little visits. I think it gives him comic relief."How come you need me?" he asked with a smile on his face as he arrived at our house one day this week. "You're the expert." He good-naturedly reminded me that the last time he came to visit, he had performed major surgery on a toilet I had "fixed" a few weeks earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 23, 1999
Being ahead of your time isn't always an advantage. Nick Hexum of 311 remembers the first time his band got played by MTV, back in 1993, on the channel's underground rock show, "120 Minutes.""We were doing that rap/rock [fusion]," he says, over the phone from his Los Angeles home. "It was such a novelty, because most of the stuff they were playing at that time was the Seattle sound."Now, however, the Seattle sound is passe, while the rap/rock approach is all the rage. But because 311 was on hiatus when Limp Bizkit, Korn and Kid Rock charged up the charts, some in the music industry say the band will be playing catch-up when it releases its new album, "Soundsystem," in early October.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 30, 1998
WHEN THE SCREEN door goes in, outdoor living begins. At our house, that happened last weekend. This was a little later in the year than usual. But with this spring's mean-spirited weather -- too much rain followed by too little -- I was reluctant to start the screen-door season.I kept waiting for a sign that nature had calmed down, that it was safe to take down some of the barriers, to invite the breeze into our home. Three days of relative calm convinced me that the time had come to remove the panel of thick, protective glass from the back door and replace it with a panel of airy, welcoming screen.
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