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By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Joseph Leahy, a husky 19-year-old from Long Island, N.Y., entered the gates of the Naval Academy early yesterday, following in his mother's footsteps. Leahy, son of one of the first female graduates of the academy, was one of about 1,200 plebes to arrive at the Annapolis military college for the punishing yearly ritual known as Induction Day. Noreen Leahy, a former naval officer who graduated with the second wave of academy women in 1981, watched her oldest child cross over from civilian to military life.
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NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
Stocky mids at the base, tall ones in the middle, and on top - the scrawniest. That was the winning formula for the determined freshmen in the Naval Academy's Class of 2008, who yesterday scaled the Herndon Monument, an annual rite of passage that marks the end of plebe year, in excellent time. The class reached the top of the 21-foot, grease-slicked granite monument in an hour and 16 minutes - the fastest time since 1988, when it took 43 minutes. At 10:16 a.m., the wobbly tower of squirming bodies suddenly hoisted John Olsen, 19, toward the top of the obelisk.
NEWS
August 14, 2004
Donning new white uniforms, more than 1,000 plebes at the U.S. Naval Academy greeted their families yesterday at the end of the grueling Plebe Summer -- a six-week program that includes rigorous physical training and instruction in academy rules and lore. The members of the Class of 2008 are enjoying three days of liberty and time with their families before beginning their first academic year. Above, Midshipman Erica Reid-Dixon gets a hug from her 10-year-old brother, Jarred, of Delaware.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Rule No. 1 of Induction Day at the U.S. Naval Academy: Do not speak unless spoken to. Rule No. 2: If you are spoken to, there are only two possible responses: Sir, yes sir! or Ma'am, yes ma'am! It might sound simple, but for many of the 1,200 freshmen - or plebes - who arrived at the academy yesterday morning for six weeks of physical and mental training, the first, and most important, order of the day proved a challenge. "Ma'am, yes ma'am!" one plebe stammered to a male upperclassman.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Rule No. 1 of Induction Day at the U.S. Naval Academy: Do not speak unless spoken to. Rule No. 2: If you are spoken to, there are only two possible responses: Sir, yes sir! or Ma'am, yes ma'am! It might sound simple, but for many of the 1,200 freshmen - or plebes - who arrived at the academy yesterday morning for six weeks of physical and mental training, the first, and most important, order of the day proved a challenge. "Ma'am, yes ma'am!" one plebe stammered to a male upperclassman.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2004
From the oval-shaped windows of an airplane, Maryland looked enough like Belize that for a moment, teenagers Andrea and Javier Bosch forgot about the lush landscape and glittering beaches of their Central American homeland. "As we arrived it was like `Wow,'" Javier Bosch said. "It's very green here, and coming from Belize, that's what we are used to." Beginning today, however, the 19-year-old twins will realize how different their lives will be at their home for the next four years: the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Just before 11 a.m. yesterday, cheers erupted from a pile of several hundred scrambling, sweat-drenched midshipmen attempting to climb Herndon Monument at the Naval Academy. Placing his feet on the shoulders of a classmate below him, a midshipman finally reached the summit of the 21-foot obelisk - coated with 150 pounds of lard - and set an upperclassman's cap on its point, an academy rite of passage marking the end of the lowly plebe (freshman) year. It was cause for celebration, to be sure - but only for a moment.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2004
Poised on all fours at the edge of puddle of mud, four plebes -- or Naval Academy freshman -- listened attentively as an upperclassman shouted orders. "Stay on your hands and knees," yelled Adam Allegro, a sophomore. "And no head locks or choking." Pausing before he set the students loose into the chocolate-colored pool, Allegro added: "Oh, and this is mud wrestling -- so wrestle!" With that, the plebes charged into the puddle, scrambling to find a water-tight picture of the academy's landmark Herndon Monument somewhere beneath the murky surface as part of the annual Sea Trials -- a day-long endurance test for the 1,150 plebes.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
The daughter of a Navy pilot and a Navy nurse, the 18-year- old woman with perfect grades saw the Naval Academy as a gateway to her dreams of flying fighter jets for her country. But disillusionment set in soon after the freshman put on a Navy uniform. A senior midshipman raped her last fall, she says, and then used his rank to try to bully her into silence. Shaken and afraid, she hoped that a school renowned for high moral standards would bring her alleged attacker to trial and keep her safe while the case was pending.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Less than a week after the Naval Academy dropped criminal charges against a senior accused of raping a female midshipman, an academy official said yesterday that the college intends to court-martial him in the next week or so on other misconduct charges. The academy superintendent, Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, is troubled that few of the school's sexual assault cases have gone to trial and feels that pursuing other charges against the midshipman will send a message to students that sexual misconduct has serious consequences, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retribution.
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