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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2001
There were no crying parents and bright-eyed teens lined up outside the Naval Academy sports arena at dawn yesterday. No baggy jeans or care packages from home. No long-haired kids learning how to salute. This was a different breed of soon-to-be midshipmen who arrived at the academy a day before 900 recent high school graduates charge through with their parents in tow today. These young men and women come from the fleet, from the Navy and Marine enlisted ranks - older, calmer and seasoned, in many cases, by years of military experience.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
A pair of plebes showed last night that, despite its current troubles, the future of Navy's basketball team looks bright. The present, however, remains gray and dreary. American defeated Navy, 64-61, at Alumni Hall, giving the Eagles a season sweep over the Mids for the second year in a row. Senior guard Steven Miles scored 27 points to lead American, helping the Eagles overcome an excellent night by Navy freshman David Hooper, who scored 24 points, the most by a plebe since Michael Heary had 31 against Army in 1995.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
More women were inducted into the Naval Academy's Class of 2010 Wednesday than in any previous class in the school's 161-year history. The 273 women also make up 22 percent of the 1,218 students who entered the academy, the highest percentage in school history and second among service academies only to the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, where women make up 28 percent of the student body. "In 1980, we admitted about 80 and in 1990, we did 136, and tomorrow, on induction day, we will have some 270," Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, the academy superintendent, said Tuesday.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
More women were inducted into the Naval Academy's Class of 2010 Wednesday than in any previous class in the school's 161-year history. The 273 women also make up 22 percent of the 1,218 students who entered the academy, the highest percentage in school history and second among service academies only to the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, where women make up 28 percent of the student body. "In 1980, we admitted about 80 and in 1990, we did 136, and [now] we will have some 270," Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, the academy superintendent, said Tuesday.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Rule No. 1 of Induction Day at the U.S. Naval Academy: Do not speak unless spoken to. Rule No. 2: If you are spoken to, there are only two possible responses: Sir, yes sir! or Ma'am, yes ma'am! It might sound simple, but for many of the 1,200 freshmen - or plebes - who arrived at the academy yesterday morning for six weeks of physical and mental training, the first, and most important, order of the day proved a challenge. "Ma'am, yes ma'am!" one plebe stammered to a male upperclassman.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
ANNAPOLIS -- Nimitz, Rickover, Farragut. The esteemed dead are alive on the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy. The buildings, playing fields, 75 monuments, benches, even trees honor Naval heroes and distinguished classes of midshipmen. Damn the torpedoes. I have not yet begun to fight. Don't give up the ship.Plebes, the freshmen of the Brigade, also face the CORE VALUES OF THE U.S. NAVAL ACADEMY: HONOR, COURAGE AND COMMITMENT. Posted in huge letters on classroom walls, the words bore into plebes.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2000
The 1,200 long-haired, scruffy-looking teen-agers dropped off at the Naval Academy gates six weeks ago were long gone yesterday as the academy's freshman class marched out in formation before more than a thousand emotional parents craning their necks to find their children. It has been a grueling six weeks for most of them. Each day begins with a 5 a.m. jog to the beat of a drill sergeant and ends with the memorization of arcane facts late into the night - all part of the process meant to indoctrinate them in the ways of the academy.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2004
Poised on all fours at the edge of puddle of mud, four plebes -- or Naval Academy freshman -- listened attentively as an upperclassman shouted orders. "Stay on your hands and knees," yelled Adam Allegro, a sophomore. "And no head locks or choking." Pausing before he set the students loose into the chocolate-colored pool, Allegro added: "Oh, and this is mud wrestling -- so wrestle!" With that, the plebes charged into the puddle, scrambling to find a water-tight picture of the academy's landmark Herndon Monument somewhere beneath the murky surface as part of the annual Sea Trials -- a day-long endurance test for the 1,150 plebes.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
As a groundswell of fan and alumni discontent grows after Navy's 0-7 start, coach Charlie Weatherbie, his staff and the players are maintaining a stiff upper lip. "The only control we have over anybody is ourselves," Weatherbie said yesterday. "We can't worry about what other people are saying or thinking. We have to do what we can control and look inside ourselves for improvement." Saturday's 28-21 defeat to Rutgers on homecoming increased the volume of the feedback during this dreary season, which began with high hopes after 1999's solid finish to a 5-7 record and six losses by seven points or fewer.
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