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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Juan Magallon enlisted in the U.S. Navy while still in his home country, the Philippines, and served 20 years, taking part in such battles as Operation Desert Storm. Now a U.S. citizen, the Tucson, Ariz., resident said he frequently spoke to his son, Justin, about the gratitude he owed the nation and its armed forces. Apparently, Justin listened. He is among 1,200 plebes in the U.S. Naval Academy's Class of 2017 who since June have been immersed in their first year at Annapolis, away from friends and family.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Netdao Yutakon of Nashville, Tenn., was still shaking her head, getting used to the lightness two days after her waist-length hair was chopped off to meet Naval Academy regulations in time for her freshman year. "It was like losing a best friend," said Yutakon, an 18-year-old graduate of Hume-Fogg Academic High School in Tennessee, as she fiddled with the locks that now come just below her ears. At least Yutakon was spared the razor. One by one, members of the freshmen class who didn't have their hair cut before Tuesday saw their locks vanish with the quick work of a barber - a ritual that was among their first tastes of academy life in Annapolis.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The Naval Academy is about molding military leaders, but when it comes to scaling a greased-up, 21-foot-tall obelisk, it takes teamwork. That's what propelled 19-year-old Midshipman Michael Landry to the top of a writhing human pyramid Monday. He topped the academy's Herndon Monument with a midshipman's hat after 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 35 seconds - a feat celebrated by his classmates with jumping, cheering and singing. "Plebes no more! Plebes no more!" members of the Class of 2017 chanted.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The Naval Academy is about molding military leaders, but when it comes to scaling a greased-up, 21-foot-tall obelisk, it takes teamwork. That's what propelled 19-year-old Midshipman Michael Landry to the top of a writhing human pyramid Monday. He topped the academy's Herndon Monument with a midshipman's hat after 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 35 seconds - a feat celebrated by his classmates with jumping, cheering and singing. "Plebes no more! Plebes no more!" members of the Class of 2017 chanted.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
The wake-up call came at 3:15 a.m. Tuesday, but Midshipman Alberto Salabarria was ready well before then. Anticipating a grueling, thrilling, muddy day of Sea Trials at the Naval Academy, Salabarria and some of his classmates couldn't wait. "Everyone was listening to music, trying to motivate themselves," Salabarria said. Staying upbeat is a key to surviving Sea Trials, a 14-hour test of strength, endurance and will that marks the end of the freshman, or "plebe," year at the Naval Academy.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
With a flick of his wrist, a U.S. Naval Academy baseball player from Orlando, Fla., tossed an upperclassman's hat atop the Herndon Monument on Monday, leading his 2016 classmates to launch into cheers of "Plebes no more!" amid roars from onlookers. "I was considering jumping and making it a little more dramatic," said Patrick Lien - who is a catcher, not pitcher, on the Navy team, "but I didn't want to fall and make a scene. " The Herndon climb was itself a scene: hundreds of plebes, or freshmen, charged a slickened, 21-foot tall granite obelisk at the service academy in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
They are plebes no longer. It took two hours, 10 minutes and 13 seconds Tuesday for the freshman class at the U.S. Naval Academy to have one of its own knock a plebe's "dixie cup" hat from the top of the greased Herndon Monument and replace it with a midshipman's hat, symbolically morphing the group into 4th-class Mids. Andrew Craig, 19, of Tulsa, Okla., achieved the goal in the noisy and slippery event that drew between 800 and 1,000 plebes, officials said. Tradition holds that the student who caps the monument will be first in the class to reach the rank of admiral, though that has yet to happen.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
The snide comments surprised Randy Kurtz, who figured she was suffering the same harrowing rites of passage as her U.S. Naval Academy classmates as they trudged through the plebe summer of 1978. "You don't belong here," the male midshipmen might say. A few seemed to take particular glee in pulling her down as she attempted the Herndon Climb, which culminates plebe year. Kurtz, a Connecticut native, was part of the third academy class to include women, and the spirit of equality had not sunk in with everyone.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | May 17, 2006
The lowly plebes, caked in mud and sweat, jogged toward the "minefield" of cinder blocks, tires and sticks and began to holler wildly. Dressed in fatigues, some with painted faces and one sporting a freshly cut Mohawk, they'd already been warned to stop their whooping or face more "PT": more push-ups, more sit-ups, more leg lifts, more pain. Almost immediately and in unison, the 25th Company of plebes began, with respects to Walt Whitman, to "sound their barbaric yawps" in defiance. The minefield was only the latest challenge for about 1,000 Naval Academy freshmen, who awoke at 3:30 a.m. yesterday to begin "Sea Trials," one of many rites that mark their transition into fully respected midshipmen at the school.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | July 2, 1994
It was during a family trip to the U.S. Naval Academy while she was in eighth grade that Emily Kochenash became interested in becoming a midshipman.Yesterday, the 17-year-old from Allentown, Pa., was standing with her family in a long, winding line, waiting to sign in and pick up her gear."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
By midmorning Tuesday, Naval Academy Midshipman Kevin Saxton had been awake for eight hours, tackled an obstacle course, survived an endurance run and beat his classmates with pugil sticks. Sweat dripping down his face as he scarfed down trail mix, Saxton said his day at the annual academy Sea Trials was already a success - a sweaty, sandy, muddy good time with his band of classmates in Annapolis. "It's a lot of fun. Pretty physically challenging," said Saxton, a systems engineering major from Grand Rapids, Mich., who aspires to be a Marine Corps pilot.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Juan Magallon enlisted in the U.S. Navy while still in his home country, the Philippines, and served 20 years, taking part in such battles as Operation Desert Storm. Now a U.S. citizen, the Tucson, Ariz., resident said he frequently spoke to his son, Justin, about the gratitude he owed the nation and its armed forces. Apparently, Justin listened. He is among 1,200 plebes in the U.S. Naval Academy's Class of 2017 who since June have been immersed in their first year at Annapolis, away from friends and family.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
Allison Pavlansky knows the challenges facing the military: Questions about mission after two long wars; budget pressures and spending cuts; rising reports of sexual assaults, and the scrutiny they have drawn. As she prepared to take her oath at the U.S. Naval Academy on Thursday, she expressed optimism for the future. "I'm just as confident now as when I made my decision," said Pavlansky, 18, of Youngstown, Ohio. "And I know that over the next nine years, everything will be taken care of. It won't be easy, but we'll get through everything.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
With a flick of his wrist, a U.S. Naval Academy baseball player from Orlando, Fla., tossed an upperclassman's hat atop the Herndon Monument on Monday, leading his 2016 classmates to launch into cheers of "Plebes no more!" amid roars from onlookers. "I was considering jumping and making it a little more dramatic," said Patrick Lien - who is a catcher, not pitcher, on the Navy team, "but I didn't want to fall and make a scene. " The Herndon climb was itself a scene: hundreds of plebes, or freshmen, charged a slickened, 21-foot tall granite obelisk at the service academy in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
The wake-up call came at 3:15 a.m. Tuesday, but Midshipman Alberto Salabarria was ready well before then. Anticipating a grueling, thrilling, muddy day of Sea Trials at the Naval Academy, Salabarria and some of his classmates couldn't wait. "Everyone was listening to music, trying to motivate themselves," Salabarria said. Staying upbeat is a key to surviving Sea Trials, a 14-hour test of strength, endurance and will that marks the end of the freshman, or "plebe," year at the Naval Academy.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
Fresh off of his referendum victories, Gov. Martin O'Malley said that throughout Maryland's history the state has been better served by "a representative democracy rather than plebiscites. " I looked up the word plebiscite in the dictionary and found it means "a vote by which the people of an entire country or district express an opinion for or against a proposal especially on a choice of government or ruler. " Put simply, the people have the ability to voice their opinion on a choice made on their behalf by the government.
EXPLORE
November 14, 2012
An article in the Nov. 16, 1912, edition of The Argus reported a Sunday showdown in the streets over love was shut down by police. Thistle, a milling village near Catonsville, had an exciting Sunday afternoon when Dorsey Harrison , 17 years old, and George Whalen , 18 years old, who hale from Ilchester, appeared on the roads flourishing pistols. The trouble, it is said, started over the attentions paid by each to a young woman of that village and the pistols were brought into play to emphasize the rival lovers' remarks.
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