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NEWS
October 3, 2013
Dan Shannahan's recent letter to the editor was sad ( "Mikulski picks the wrong side on Obamacare," Sept. 30). I'm sorry he has apparently suffered in the private sector, but his Schadenfreude at the hardships federal workers might be experiencing is just pathetic. The jealousy and resentment seething from his letter aren't really that surprising, of course, given that they are fostered by talk radio and the tea party, a standard tactic of demagogues who want people to blame others for their situation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
I had one of those soul-satisfying, I-love-Baltimore nights a few Saturdays back at Cafe Gia Ristorante, a colorful, cheerful and satisfying Italian restaurant on the corner of High Street and Eastern Avenue. We showed up for early dinner reservations and were whisked right upstairs to the narrow second-floor balcony, which was pretty darn magical on this particular night. The view from there isn't spectacular, but it's captivating, a mix of old and new. Across the street, you can see diners on the balcony at Dalesio's, and further back, the high- and medium-rise luxury apartment buildings of the Harbor East development.
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NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 22, 1995
IF YOU ARE fed up with the Puritan tyranny over modern America, boy, have I got a book for you!"Endangered Pleasures" is the title. It is by Barbara Holland, and its underlying philosophical question is, "If the carefully lived life is so good for you, how come the people living it spend so much time thinking about death?"Ms. Holland shamelessly advocates all the pleasures that have fallen into low repute since modern Puritanism cast its pall over the country. These include martinis, breakfast, wood fires, real coffee, loafing, lunching with lovers -- as opposed to big shots -- and doing your own gardening, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
HEALTH
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Not all addictions live up to their advance press. In the past decade, it's become common to casually and humorously describe a favorite activity in the parlance of chemical dependency. People speak of being "addicted" to chocolate or high-fat foods, playing video games, buying expensive designer shoes, watching weekly episodes of "American Idol" to sleeping on high-thread-count sheets. But according to "The Compass of Pleasure," a new book by Johns Hopkins neuroscientist David Linden that is being released today by The Viking Press, just two of those pursuits -- eating fatty foods and shopping -- can become genuine addictions for some people.
NEWS
December 1, 2002
The Coast Guard was trying to determine why an unmanned 40-foot pleasure craft sank at a marina near the Inner Harbor early yesterday. The Miss Complextion was discovered underwater at the Anchorage Marina on Boston Street at about 5:30 a.m., said Petty Officer Steven Rogers of the Coast Guard Activities Office in Baltimore. A salvage company managed to raise the wooden vessel by 8:40 p.m. and anchor it at the marina. The boat spilled about 10 gallons of fuel into the harbor, leaving a light sheen that evaporated in the morning sun, Rogers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 12, 1990
'The Pleasure Raiders' When: Wednesdays to Saturdays at 8 p.m.; matinees Sundays at p.m. Through Oct. 28.Where: Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St.Tickets: $10-$16.Call: 752-8558.... * 1/2 Last winter "The Pleasure Raiders" -- a socio-political sci-fi detective story by Baltimore's Impossible Industrial Action theater company -- debuted at Towson State University. Now a second production, billed as "a reworking," is playing a three-week run at the Theatre Project.It hasn't been reworked enough.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | January 7, 1996
Cheers to Donna Shalala for standing up for common sense. At the unveiling last week of the federal government's latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the health and human services secretary defended the idea of moderation -- not an easy thing to do in the face of ardent diet vigilantes.Just as admirable was her defense of the new recommendations which, she said, ''finally admit what many of us have known all along -- that food is not just fuel, it is one of life's great pleasures.''Only in AmericaOnly in America could a set of dietary guidelines produce such a flurry of interest-group lobbying, or be met with the harsh criticism of those for whom any compromise in dietary discipline seems tantamount to death.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 18, 2002
PARIS -- It is not the new currency that strikes this returning visitor's eye. The euro has been accepted, and the franc retired, without much fuss. Nor is it the mobile phone that hangs from nearly every French citizen like an earring. Nor is it the Benetton on the Champs-Elysees or The Gap on the Rue de Commerce that seem like icons of change and globalization. On this bright April day, as I leave the much demeaned and very crowded McDonald's where I have been allowed to indulge my great-nephew in not-so-French fries as a nod to his dual citizenship, I confront an image much more surprising: Crowds of young French men and women walking and eating their way down the street.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2000
In "For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again," Michael Tremblay writes about his mother with that rarest of sentiments: love untainted by embarrassment. The play doesn't equivocate, hold back or glance away. Although the 100-minute show is quite funny, it doesn't hide its feelings behind a scrim of jokes. And it's not afraid to weave an extravagant fantasy when that's the best way of getting at the truth. If only the acting and staging were as wise and honest as the script. The show takes place in Montreal in the 1950s and 1960s, among the French-Canadian working class.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
The Morgan State University Board of Regents offered President David Wilson an "appointment" but no formal job contract this week and said he will continue to serve at "the pleasure of the board. " The college's governing board met in closed session for an hour Tuesday to debate Wilson's one-year contract, which is set to expire at the end of June. The appointment, which begins July 1, has no end date. "Morgan is a very special institution, which I have enjoyed leading now for four wonderful years," Wilson said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
It's been a busy three years for Marta Ines Quintana, owner of Towson's Havana Road. There's her thriving catering business, a line of fully prepared packaged dinners Quintana developed for supermarket sales, and a cookbook and television show - both are works in progress that will showcase traditional Cuban restaurants as well as Quintana's contemporary spins on them. You might think all of that would distract Quintana from the restaurant itself - a bright spot on a drab Pennsylvania Avenue dining strip.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
Dan Shannahan's recent letter to the editor was sad ( "Mikulski picks the wrong side on Obamacare," Sept. 30). I'm sorry he has apparently suffered in the private sector, but his Schadenfreude at the hardships federal workers might be experiencing is just pathetic. The jealousy and resentment seething from his letter aren't really that surprising, of course, given that they are fostered by talk radio and the tea party, a standard tactic of demagogues who want people to blame others for their situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
Sitting on the cool patio at Donna's at Cross Key's, enjoying a fine dinner of gazpacho, Moroccan-spiced lamb meatballs and bouillabaisse, I got to telling my friends about the old days at Donna's. These friends weren't living in Baltimore back in 1992, when it all started. "You know," I told them, "no one was dipping bread in olive oil before Donna's started it. " I'm not sure they believed it. I'm not sure I believe it, but that's how I remember it. If you've forgotten 1992 - I know I have - Bill Clinton was elected president, the Orioles played their first season at Camden Yards and Michael Keaton was Batman.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Old Catonsville boasts turn-of-the-last-century buildings and schools, fine restaurants, antiques and music shops, and a library. But scattered among the Victorian structures are Arts and Crafts-style homes built in the early 20th century. It is in one of these that the Shaw family resides, just blocks off of the town's main street. "We moved here from just two blocks away," said Kelley Shaw, a 37-year-old speech pathologist. "Our [other] house had no driveway and we loved the porches on these old houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick,
The Baltimore Sun
| March 28, 2013
Artifact Coffee, Amy and Spike Gjerdes' follow-up to their acclaimed Woodberry Kitchen , has been growing on me. In the span of eight days, I had two of my favorite restaurant entrees of the past year at Artifact Coffee. The first night was a 12-hour braised pork shoulder with rigatoni, tossed with roasted turnips in a pesto made from sharp-flavored ramps, the early spring vegetable sometimes called wild garlic. Another night was a sublime stew of chicken, carrots, parsnips and kohlrabi bathed in red wine.
NEWS
January 28, 1997
Police logPasadena: Someone broke into the Kurtz Pleasure Beach club overnight Saturday and stole two cases of beer, valued at $45.Pub Date: 1/28/97
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 9, 1994
When I heard about the "pleasure-revenge" trend that is said to be spreading through the land, I had a piece of cheesecake in celebration. This is my kind of movement.After suffering through "the siege of skinned chicken," the years when low-fat, low-flavor food was the rage, there at last appears to be some relief on the culinary horizon.Basically the pleasure-revenge trend is about cutting yourself some slack. No longer should you feel guilty if you don't constantly eat bad-tasting food.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 21, 2013
After last week's heavy (relatively speaking) "Feud" episode, we get a dose of "Glee" fluff in this week's "Guilty Pleasures" show. It all starts when Blaine spies Sam pilfering bags of pasta from the school cafeteria. He assumes it's to feed his family, but then learns it's really to fulfill Sam's guilty pleasure: macaroni portraits. He's done Emma Stone, LeAnn Rimes, Ralph Macchio and even Kurt. ("The macaroni really captures him," Blaine agrees.) The incident plants the seed for the Glee club's weekly assignment, courtesy of Sam and Blaine since Mr. Schuster is out with "the flu. " (whatever that really means)
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 24, 2012
It wasn't an easy road this fall for the Manchester Valley High School girls' soccer team. After winning the school's first-ever state championship last fall, the Mavericks endured graduation losses at several key spots, and with a 4-3-2 record at midseason, coach Joe Miller's team was far from a lock to repeat as Class 1A state champions. At that point, the coach made some lineup changes and watched his charges take off. A season-ending nine-game winning streak was more than enough to propel the team to a second straight Manchester Valley state championship.
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