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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
Fortunately for us all, the world isn't in black and white."Pleasantville," a deliciously subversive and visually stunning film from first-time writer-director Gary Ross (whose previous screenplays include "Big" and "Dave"), uses a '50s-era sitcom world to drive that point home. And while the film is marred by some unnecessary preachifying at the end, the time spent getting there has been so filled with wit and imagination that its flaws are easy to overlook.David and Jennifer (Tobey Maguire and Reese Witherspoon)
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 7, 2011
Members of the Fallston Volunteer Fire Company will be visiting neighborhoods along Pleasantville Road between Fallston and Forest Hill Thursday evening to offer free home safety checks and hand out free smoke detectors to those who need them. The neighborhoods where the visits are planned had a tragic last month that included a fatal tree trimming accident and two house fires, one of which also resulted in a fatality, County Councilman Joe Woods, who represents the area, said.
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NEWS
September 17, 1995
Meeting scheduled on expanding deer huntThe Maryland Department of Natural Resources has scheduled a public meeting for 7 p.m. Sept. 28 at Fallston High School to discuss a proposal to include the Pleasantville section of Gunpowder Falls State Park in the Sweet Air managed white-tailed deer hunt.The proposal was made after area residents expressed concern about the large deer population in the park and the negative effect of deer not only on park vegetation and wildlife, but also on crops and shrubs.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 22, 2004
HOW DO YOU rate yourself as a driver? No, that's a stupid question. You rate yourself above average. It's a well-known fact that all humans consider themselves to be above-average drivers, including primitive Amazonian mud people who have not yet discovered the wheel. No amount of physical evidence will convince a bad driver that he or she is a bad driver. You take a motorist who, while attempting to pull out of a parking space, mistakes "forward" for "reverse," then, in an effort to correct this error, mistakes the accelerator for the brake and sends his car (an Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme)
NEWS
August 22, 2003
On Monday, August 18, 2003, ALLEN THOMAS, of Baltimore. Surviving are an aunt, Emma Winchester, Centreville; nieces, Charlotte Hudson of Pleasantville, NJ, and Joy Hudson of Chicago, IL; a nephew, Stacey Brown of Atlantic City, NJ; great-nephews, Shayne Hudson, James Allen Hudson and Byron Linwood Washington, and a host of cousins and friends. Services 11 AM Saturday, August 23, 2003 in Charles Wesley UM Church, South Liberty Street, Centreville, where friends may call from 10 AM. Burial in Chesterfield Cemetery.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2004
Two brothers pleaded guilty yesterday to charges stemming from a fight in a Ferndale park in February that left one man dead and another seriously wounded. William Russell Ross, 21, of Ridgely was charged with second-degree murder in the death of Roger Jefferson Harrison, 20, who was stabbed in Pleasantville Park in Ferndale. Ross pleaded guilty to manslaughter under the terms of his plea agreement, said Assistant State's Attorney Kelly M. Poma. His brother, Bryan Francis Ross Jr., 23, had been charged with attempted second-degree murder in the stabbing of John Wesley Tomer III, 21, who survived stab wounds to the upper body.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer Staff writer Jay Apperson contributed to this article | February 13, 1992
A Randallstown lawyer disbarred for stealing more than $54,000 from a client in 1989 now faces a charge in New Jersey of practicing medicine without a license at a medical clinic he and his wife opened last month.If convicted, Fred Kolodner, 66, could be sentenced to five years in prison and a fine of $7,500, Atlantic County Prosecutor Jeffrey Blitz said. Mr. Kolodner is free pending trial.The charge stems from the opening last month of the Kolodner Medical Center on North Main Street in tiny Pleasantville, N.J., near Atlantic City.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer Staff writer Jay Apperson contributed to this article | February 13, 1992
A Randallstown lawyer disbarred for stealing more than $54,000 from a client in 1989 now faces a charge in New Jersey of practicing medicine without a license at a medical clinic he and his wife opened last month.If convicted, Fred Kolodner, 66, could be sentenced to five years in prison and fined $7,500, Atlantic County Prosecutor Jeffrey Blitz said. Mr. Kolodner is free pending trial.The charge stems from the opening last month of the Kolodner Medical Center on North Main Street in tiny Pleasantville, N.J., near Atlantic City.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
James Algar, 85, who brought nature and history documentaries as well as animated classics to Disney fans for 43 years, died Thursday in Carmel, Calif. He was best known for the Disney True Life Adventure Series he directed, including the episodes "Beaver Valley," "Bear Country" and "The Living Desert."Dr. George H. Hitchings, 92, who won the Nobel Prize in medicine for helping pioneer research techniques used by the modern pharmaceutical industry, died Friday in Chapel Hill, N.C. He and research partner Gertrude Elion won the Nobel Prize in 1988 for work that led to drugs for AIDS, herpes, leukemia and malaria, sharing the prize with Sir James W. Black of Britain.
NEWS
June 15, 1993
Police-community council to meetA meeting of the Eastern District Police-Community Relations Council is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Eastern District Police Station, 3700 Mountain Road.The guest speaker will be from the Department of Natural Resources Police. Capt. Tom Shanahan, Eastern District commander, will be available to discuss crime statistics, crime prevention and law enforcement in the community.Traffic stop of woman results in drug chargesCounty police arrested a Glen Burnie woman on drug charges after they stopped her car on Marley Neck Boulevard Wednesday.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2004
Two brothers pleaded guilty yesterday to charges stemming from a fight in a Ferndale park in February that left one man dead and another seriously wounded. William Russell Ross, 21, of Ridgely was charged with second-degree murder in the death of Roger Jefferson Harrison, 20, who was stabbed in Pleasantville Park in Ferndale. Ross pleaded guilty to manslaughter under the terms of his plea agreement, said Assistant State's Attorney Kelly M. Poma. His brother, Bryan Francis Ross Jr., 23, had been charged with attempted second-degree murder in the stabbing of John Wesley Tomer III, 21, who survived stab wounds to the upper body.
NEWS
May 8, 2004
Georgia A. Davis, a retired cook and nurse, died May 1 of cancer at her West Baltimore home. She was 66. She was born Georgia Alma Pettigrew in Amherst, Va., moved to Baltimore as a child and was a 1956 graduate of Dunbar High School. Mrs. Davis began cooking professionally in the late 1950s. She worked for the old Bluefeld Catering Co. and later Martin's Caterers, from which she retired in 2000. She also worked as a private duty nurse. She enjoyed entertaining family and friends, and was known for her seafood dishes, especially lobster Cantonese, seafood gumbo and crab imperial, family members said.
NEWS
August 22, 2003
On Monday, August 18, 2003, ALLEN THOMAS, of Baltimore. Surviving are an aunt, Emma Winchester, Centreville; nieces, Charlotte Hudson of Pleasantville, NJ, and Joy Hudson of Chicago, IL; a nephew, Stacey Brown of Atlantic City, NJ; great-nephews, Shayne Hudson, James Allen Hudson and Byron Linwood Washington, and a host of cousins and friends. Services 11 AM Saturday, August 23, 2003 in Charles Wesley UM Church, South Liberty Street, Centreville, where friends may call from 10 AM. Burial in Chesterfield Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nine days before Seabiscuit's national debut, filmmaker Gary Ross, who previously wrote the hit comedies Big and Dave and wrote and directed the subversive fantasy Pleasantville, sat in a D.C. cafe and said: "Sometimes we give ourselves a little too much credit for the way things are rendered. Sometimes what gives our work its impact are the facts and power of the story." (The movie opens across the country Friday and receives its Maryland premiere tonight at the Senator, in a sold-out benefit for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Maryland Horse Industry Foundation.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 23, 2003
RECENTLY, my little brother Phil (he's only 50) gave me a box that wound up with him some years ago, when our mother died and a bunch of family flotsam drifted down one generation. The box contains slides. For you young, digital readers, I should explain that slides are transparencies made from photographs. They used to be very popular. When you wanted to look at big, bright images of your vacation, you'd get out your slides, spend a few seconds thinking about what a pain it was to set up the projector and screen, then put your slides back away, unviewed.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
Fortunately for us all, the world isn't in black and white."Pleasantville," a deliciously subversive and visually stunning film from first-time writer-director Gary Ross (whose previous screenplays include "Big" and "Dave"), uses a '50s-era sitcom world to drive that point home. And while the film is marred by some unnecessary preachifying at the end, the time spent getting there has been so filled with wit and imagination that its flaws are easy to overlook.David and Jennifer (Tobey Maguire and Reese Witherspoon)
NEWS
May 8, 2004
Georgia A. Davis, a retired cook and nurse, died May 1 of cancer at her West Baltimore home. She was 66. She was born Georgia Alma Pettigrew in Amherst, Va., moved to Baltimore as a child and was a 1956 graduate of Dunbar High School. Mrs. Davis began cooking professionally in the late 1950s. She worked for the old Bluefeld Catering Co. and later Martin's Caterers, from which she retired in 2000. She also worked as a private duty nurse. She enjoyed entertaining family and friends, and was known for her seafood dishes, especially lobster Cantonese, seafood gumbo and crab imperial, family members said.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer Staff writers Jay Apperson and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | February 23, 1992
The latest pages in the life ledger of Fred Kolodner read this way:Convicted of sports betting. Estranged from family. Slapped with palimony suit. Disbarred. Charged with practicing law without license. Convicted of stealing from clients. Accused of hiding money from creditors in bankruptcy proceedings.Two weeks ago, a new entry was recorded, the strangest one yet. Arrested in New Jersey at age 66 for practicing medicine without a license.Fred Kolodner may never have risen all that high, but his fall from grace has seemingly been without end.It is now a distant memory, but there was a time when Fred Kolodner's life was full of promise.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
James Algar, 85, who brought nature and history documentaries as well as animated classics to Disney fans for 43 years, died Thursday in Carmel, Calif. He was best known for the Disney True Life Adventure Series he directed, including the episodes "Beaver Valley," "Bear Country" and "The Living Desert."Dr. George H. Hitchings, 92, who won the Nobel Prize in medicine for helping pioneer research techniques used by the modern pharmaceutical industry, died Friday in Chapel Hill, N.C. He and research partner Gertrude Elion won the Nobel Prize in 1988 for work that led to drugs for AIDS, herpes, leukemia and malaria, sharing the prize with Sir James W. Black of Britain.
NEWS
August 24, 1997
Joseph J. Eilers Sr., 102 accountant for railroadJoseph J. Eilers Sr., a certified public accountant who worked for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad for more than half a century, died Thursday at Spa Creek Rehabilitation Center in Annapolis from complications of a fall. He was 102.Mr. Eilers was born and raised in Sidney, Ohio, the son of a railroader, and graduated from Jacobs Business College.He began his railroad career in 1906 as a lamplighter for switch lamps in the B&O's Sidney yards. He later worked in the accounting department, and, in 1946, moved to Baltimore and the railroad's Charles Street headquarters.
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