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By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 11, 1996
The 15th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival begins tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre with "The Portable Tutweiller," a comedy about divorce written by Geoffrey Bond and directed by Barry Feinstein.This year's festival features four full-length plays and two one-acts produced at three area theaters. Here's the rest of the line-up: "Saint Sylvia," by Nan Kirchhoff, tomorrow-Aug. 3, Spotlighters Theatre; "Keeping It Aloft," by John Morogiello, Aug. 2-18, Vagabond Players; "Real Time," by Mimi Teahan, Aug. 8-25, Fell's Point Corner; "Chin Music," by Joe Dennison, and "Saturday Morning Television," by Joe Thompson, Aug. 9-24, Spotlighters.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
The numbers tell an impressive tale: 266 plays by 158 playwrights produced by 25 companies during a 29-year span. Those figures from the Baltimore Playwrights Festival are about to tick higher. Starting Friday and wrapping up in early September, the festival's 30th anniversary season will present seven new works, staged at five theaters in the area. It's the culmination of an annual effort to shine a spotlight on local playwrights, an effort that started with the Vagabond Players , the country's oldest community theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 12, 1999
Final productions debutThe final two productions in this year's prolific Baltimore Playwrights Festival will debut this weekend -- Jim Sizemore's "Joe Pete" opens tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, and Rosemary Frisino Toohey's "Gladys in Wonderland" opens tomorrow at the Vagabonds.The second part of a projected trilogy, "Joe Pete" is a cautionary barroom drama, directed by Richard Dean Stover and starring Leo Knight. "Gladys in Wonderland," directed by Betty May, focuses on an octogenarian who confronts her personal angel of death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
They looked so innocuous, the two women, both in their 70s. Their stated intention — to provide shelter for the homeless — seemed so laudable. It took a Los Angeles traffic officer operating on a hunch to determine that the two senior citizens had planned and put into action a bizarre murder-for-profit plot. The real-life arrests of Helen Golay and Olga Rutterschmidt in 2006 riveted local writer Susan Middaugh, and formed the basis of "Black Widows," one of the featured dramas in the Baltimore Playwrights Festival, which begins its 29th season this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 17, 2000
Playwrights Festival ends with a parody "Ancient Geeks," the final production of this year's Baltimore Playwrights Festival, opens tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Written by festival veteran John Wallace Teahan, this comedy updates and parodies three "original classics" including Plato, Homer and Helen of Troy. Richard Dean Stover directs a cast headed by Teresa M. Altoz, Kevin Chap, Leo Knight, Mike Nowicke, John Sadowsky and Russell Wooldridge. The requisite Greek chorus includes Debbie Bennett, Joseph M. Dunn, Lydia Real, Michael Robinson and Danielle Suder.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 15, 1996
The subject of popular entertainment is the common thread connecting the pair of one-act plays being presented at the Spot-lighters Theatre as the final entry in this summer's Baltimore Playwrights Festival.Joe Dennison's "Chin Music" is about baseball, and Joe Thompson's "Saturday Morning Television" is about, well, television. And both are involving, in part because they depict the dangers of excess."Chin Music" -- baseball slang for a ball thrown at the batter's head -- takes place on April 1, 1995, the day before the end of the eight-month baseball strike.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | August 29, 1991
The Baltimore Playwrights Festival has concluded its 10th season. This year, 52 original scripts by Baltimore playwrights were submitted. From these, local theaters selected nine for production.Short dramas about personal relationships and people caught up in the everyday treadmill of life predominated the better presentations.The following is a breakdown of what this columnist considers the best of the festival."The Naked House Painting Society" by Robert H. Bowie Jr., produced by the Spotlighters.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 2, 2002
Ten new plays by Marylanders will be produced by eight area theaters in this summer's Baltimore Playwrights Festival. The list of theaters includes one newcomer, Baltimore's newest community theater, Paragon, and one former participant returning to the fold, Arena Players. "I think this is the year of diversity," festival chairman Rodney S. Bonds said, referring not only to the fact that the plays range from historical dramas to romantic comedies to a murder mystery, but also to their racially diverse dramatis personae.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 23, 2005
Blue Mermaid, a new play by prolific Baltimore Playwrights Festival author Mark Scharf, is the latest Playwrights Festival offering. Opening tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, the drama, set in Ocean City, focuses on three generations of women in the same family as they struggle to find themselves and reforge familial bonds. Under Alex Willis' direction, Susan Scher plays the grandmother, Tiffany James plays her mixed-raced granddaughter and Pam Feldman plays the girl's aunt. Show times at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 7 p.m. Sundays, through July 10. Tickets are $14. Call 410-276-7837.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 13, 2006
From Shakespeare to transit systems, from language usage to landscaping. The four one-act plays at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, jointly titled The Past Is Present, tackle diverse subjects at the same time that they showcase some of the Baltimore Playwrights Festival's more talented writing and acting. All four are by festival veterans. The middle two -Memory Garden and Wilderness, both by Mark Scharf - are distinguished by strong naturalistic dialogue and character development. In the first, a young widow (portrayed by Janise Whelan with a convincing blend of sensitivity and anger)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 11, 2005
Do you believe? The Baltimore Playwrights Festival continues tonight with the opening of The Best Christmas Murder Ever, an Uncommon Voices production at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Ron Holsey's dark comedy was a winner in the 2004 Carolinas Contemporary Playwrights Festival. The action is set at Christmastime in Western Maryland, where a family holds tight to its belief in Santa Claus, even though, ominously, the jolly guy in the red suit hasn't made an appearance for 14 years. The cast, directed by Miriam Bazensky, is headed by Nancy Dall, Janise Bonds and Lisa Geyer, as three adult sisters, and also features Jimmy Morgan and Emily Holmes Hahn as two of the sisters' six offspring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 23, 2005
Blue Mermaid, a new play by prolific Baltimore Playwrights Festival author Mark Scharf, is the latest Playwrights Festival offering. Opening tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, the drama, set in Ocean City, focuses on three generations of women in the same family as they struggle to find themselves and reforge familial bonds. Under Alex Willis' direction, Susan Scher plays the grandmother, Tiffany James plays her mixed-raced granddaughter and Pam Feldman plays the girl's aunt. Show times at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 7 p.m. Sundays, through July 10. Tickets are $14. Call 410-276-7837.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2005
Rob Nagle stomped across a stage yesterday, shouting in a gravelly voice to portray a boorish, discontented Sun in a play about the solar system. Then he put on a fake beak to play a talking toucan in a tale about why palm trees have coconuts. The quirky roles figured in a pair of plays written by Baltimore second-graders and performed by professional actors last night at Center Stage's annual Young Playwrights Festival. This is the first year festival organizers have accepted submissions from children as young as first-graders - and organizers said they are glad they did. Two of the five plays chosen from among 250 entries were written by three city second-graders: Dylan Balter and Hanna Lau, 7-year-olds who attend Midtown Academy, and 8-year-old Lizzie Smith of Bryn Mawr School.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 6, 2004
Ten plays, on subjects ranging from pre-Civil Rights era racism to a family business, will be produced by seven local theater companies in this summer's Baltimore Playwrights Festival. It may be indicative of how institutionalized the 23-year-old festival has become that all but three of this year's playwrights are festival veterans. Two of those - Mark Scharf (who is also the festival chairman) and Joe Dennison - will each be shepherding their 11th festival productions. At the same time, the roster of participating theaters includes a newcomer - the Invisible Theatre Company, founded in the late 1990s by a group of Roland Park Country School alumnae.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 25, 2003
The Baltimore Playwrights Festival lost one of its most dedicated leaders earlier this month when Rodney S. Bonds, who served as chairman for six years, moved to South Carolina. But it found a new leader in an old friend. Last week, playwright Mark Scharf was named festival chairman. One of the event's most produced playwrights, Scharf has had six full-length plays and four one-acts staged by the community theater festival since 1994. Several of those plays have had subsequent productions or staged readings at theaters as far away as Singapore and Australia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Makeba Scott Hunter and Makeba Scott Hunter,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
To Get to the Other Side, the best-script winner at the 1994 Baltimore Playwrights Festival, is making a comeback this year with a revival performance to kick off a new playwright residency program developed in honor of the play's late author, Carol Weinberg. The play, which takes place in Georgia over six years beginning in the mid-1980s, tells the story of two women, one black and one white, who form a bond in high school and room together in college. It shows the highs and lows of the relationship as the girls adjust to some harsh racial situations on campus.
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