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By Michael Himowitz and Michael Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | October 8, 1990
I DON'T normally write about educational software because I don't find much to write about.Most educational programs are ultimately boring, not ver educational, or both. This is particularly true of software for preschoolers.At their heart, computers require at least a minimal amount o literacy, and it's particularly hard to write good software for children too young to read.But now and then I run across a program that restores my faith i the creativity of the profession. Playroom, from Broderbund Software, is a delightful offering from a company that knows kids and really seems to like them.
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NEWS
November 12, 2003
FOR THE FAMILIES of children battling catastrophic illnesses, the city's Ronald McDonald House is an oasis. For a lone man on Saturday morning, the nonprofit shelter was a plump target. He should have known better. Besides being illegal, his stealing video game systems from the house's playroom was carelessness doubled. Not only did he let himself be videotaped in the act - which should help police collect him off the street - he tore at the protective social curtain helping these hard-pressed families face down one of the scariest times of their lives.
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FEATURES
By BETH SMITH | January 23, 1994
When architects Richard Luxenburg and Mike Ryan began designing a three-story, 4,100-square-foot addition to a home in Mount Washington, they knew the basement level was going to more than a catch-all storage area. Their clients, two doctors with children, wanted a high-tech, professional exercise room/spa, one which would give them a clear view of a nearby playroom when working out or relaxing in the hot tub.Teaming up with interior designer Jun Villones and Dwight Griffith of Griffith-Brilhart Builders Inc., Mr. Luxenburg and Mr. Ryan carved out a contemporary space bounded by floor-to-ceiling glass.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Between the entrances to two Carroll County courtrooms is a door with a paper sign reading "Please walk in." Anybody who does finds a suite of offices where parents can work out custody battles while their children play in a room adorned with a mural of forest animals frolicking in a green meadow. This is the new home of the Carroll Circuit Court's Family Law Administration in the Courthouse Annex. In the past, children would sometimes amuse themselves in a judge's chambers while the grownups settled their legal differences.
BUSINESS
By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Contributing Writer | October 30, 1994
Joe and Suzanne Cline had always dreamed of a house in the country."I grew up in College Park, and when we bought the house, we were looking for a country house," said Mr. Cline, 37. The home they bought was a turn-of-the-century 1,100-square-foot, two-bedroom farmhand's house in Columbia, which they bought 1983 for $74,000. Since then, they have expanded the house to 2,830 square feet. It was recently appraised for $276,000.The house sits atop a hill on a 3-acre lot crossed by a creek. A garage and barn are across a gravel driveway from the house, and a footbridge with a tin roof with the "Mail Pouch Tobacco" logo straddles the creek behind the house.
NEWS
August 24, 2002
THE HOUR glows blood red on the nightstand clock: 1:20 a.m. Awake, disoriented. The urgent beeping that summons the sleeper is not coming from the timepiece. Beep ... beep ... infusion complete ... infusion complete ... the green letters scroll across a digital panel monitoring doses of painkiller, antibiotic, fluid given intravenously. A nurse pads into the room. Go back to sleep, Mom, she murmurs. He's fine. At 5 a.m., the alarm chatters again, but this time, the patient stirs. A little hand darts from a swath of white blankets and tangle of tubes, and pokes a button on the IV machine.
NEWS
November 12, 2003
FOR THE FAMILIES of children battling catastrophic illnesses, the city's Ronald McDonald House is an oasis. For a lone man on Saturday morning, the nonprofit shelter was a plump target. He should have known better. Besides being illegal, his stealing video game systems from the house's playroom was carelessness doubled. Not only did he let himself be videotaped in the act - which should help police collect him off the street - he tore at the protective social curtain helping these hard-pressed families face down one of the scariest times of their lives.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | August 14, 1999
THE SOUND of a helicopter buzzing overhead is not a noise we city dwellers welcome. It's sure sign of trouble -- especially at 5 in the morning. Before long I smelled the smoke of burning aged wood, an unmistakable urban scent that means more grief.There was a good breeze blowing, and I guessed the fire was a distance away. It wasn't. My father called about 7 and reported that a Guilford Avenue house down the block from his had been burned out.The damaged place was what we called the Lenhards' home, although that family had not lived there for more than 30 years.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2000
Police, community and county leaders gathered in Woodmoor yesterday to open the county's newest Police Athletic League center, a facility that officials hope will help curb juvenile crime. "We are giving an alternative to some of the things happening in the street," County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger said at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. "We must capture our youth and give them the opportunity." The center cost $1.2 million, with the cost being split by the county and the state.
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | December 6, 1993
Students: Freshman John Bova, 13; sophomore David Gorrie, 15; and seniors Martha Hopkins and Erin Kilby, both 17.Accomplishments/Interests: John, David, Martha and Erin earned straight A's on their most recent report cards, placing them on the school's honor roll. But their talents extend beyond studying.John plays in the band. "Mount percussion, like the xylophone, glockenspiel and the bells," he said, "Music is a big thing."He said he also enjoys odd and unusual research. "Like ancient Chinese war games," he said.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Between the entrances to two Carroll County courtrooms is a door with a paper sign reading "Please walk in." Anybody who does finds a suite of offices where parents can work out custody battles while their children play in a room adorned with a mural of forest animals frolicking in a green meadow. This is the new home of the Carroll Circuit Court's Family Law Administration in the Courthouse Annex. In the past, children would sometimes amuse themselves in a judge's chambers while the grownups settled their legal differences.
NEWS
August 24, 2002
THE HOUR glows blood red on the nightstand clock: 1:20 a.m. Awake, disoriented. The urgent beeping that summons the sleeper is not coming from the timepiece. Beep ... beep ... infusion complete ... infusion complete ... the green letters scroll across a digital panel monitoring doses of painkiller, antibiotic, fluid given intravenously. A nurse pads into the room. Go back to sleep, Mom, she murmurs. He's fine. At 5 a.m., the alarm chatters again, but this time, the patient stirs. A little hand darts from a swath of white blankets and tangle of tubes, and pokes a button on the IV machine.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | June 3, 2001
OCEAN CITY -- If you were a little boy, this would be your dream vacation home. The first-floor playroom, with two arcade video games and an antique Coke machine, opens right onto the beach, and you're just a few yards from the ocean. At the same time, the house is in the middle of Ocean City, so you can walk across the street to play miniature golf or head for the nearest ice cream parlor. A Bob's Big Boy stands at the entrance to the kitchen. Not a hamburger joint, of course, but the restaurant chain's icon: an 8-foot pop-art kid in a red-and-white-checkered jump suit holding up a hamburger.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2000
Police, community and county leaders gathered in Woodmoor yesterday to open the county's newest Police Athletic League center, a facility that officials hope will help curb juvenile crime. "We are giving an alternative to some of the things happening in the street," County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger said at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. "We must capture our youth and give them the opportunity." The center cost $1.2 million, with the cost being split by the county and the state.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | August 14, 1999
THE SOUND of a helicopter buzzing overhead is not a noise we city dwellers welcome. It's sure sign of trouble -- especially at 5 in the morning. Before long I smelled the smoke of burning aged wood, an unmistakable urban scent that means more grief.There was a good breeze blowing, and I guessed the fire was a distance away. It wasn't. My father called about 7 and reported that a Guilford Avenue house down the block from his had been burned out.The damaged place was what we called the Lenhards' home, although that family had not lived there for more than 30 years.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1996
Sharks circle a brilliant coral reef and starships battle in deep space on the walls of Westminster's new family center -- thanks to local free-lance artist Nicole Maria Stanton."
FEATURES
By Ro Logrippo and Antonio F. Torrice and Ro Logrippo and Antonio F. Torrice,Contributing Writers | January 17, 1993
Where can children play indoors when it's too cold, dark or miserable outdoors, or when they're tired of being room-bound?It's a perplexing question year-round but especially now, when winter weather often spells school closure or sickness that translates to endless hours at home indoors.Undoubtedly, the ideal solution is a permanent playroom. But if the place where you live doesn't permit that luxury, do the next best thing. Improvise an area for play that takes advantage of auxiliary space you do have.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1996
Sharks circle a brilliant coral reef and starships battle in deep space on the walls of Westminster's new family center -- thanks to local free-lance artist Nicole Maria Stanton."
BUSINESS
By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Contributing Writer | October 30, 1994
Joe and Suzanne Cline had always dreamed of a house in the country."I grew up in College Park, and when we bought the house, we were looking for a country house," said Mr. Cline, 37. The home they bought was a turn-of-the-century 1,100-square-foot, two-bedroom farmhand's house in Columbia, which they bought 1983 for $74,000. Since then, they have expanded the house to 2,830 square feet. It was recently appraised for $276,000.The house sits atop a hill on a 3-acre lot crossed by a creek. A garage and barn are across a gravel driveway from the house, and a footbridge with a tin roof with the "Mail Pouch Tobacco" logo straddles the creek behind the house.
FEATURES
By BETH SMITH | January 23, 1994
When architects Richard Luxenburg and Mike Ryan began designing a three-story, 4,100-square-foot addition to a home in Mount Washington, they knew the basement level was going to more than a catch-all storage area. Their clients, two doctors with children, wanted a high-tech, professional exercise room/spa, one which would give them a clear view of a nearby playroom when working out or relaxing in the hot tub.Teaming up with interior designer Jun Villones and Dwight Griffith of Griffith-Brilhart Builders Inc., Mr. Luxenburg and Mr. Ryan carved out a contemporary space bounded by floor-to-ceiling glass.
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