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NEWS
October 20, 2003
Preston E. Smith, 91, a former Texas governor known for his assortment of polka-dot ties and his old-fashioned electioneering, died Saturday in Lubbock. A Democrat elected to the first of two terms as governor in 1968, he relied on personal contacts, face-to-face campaigning and direct mail. Mr. Smith focused on education and criminal justice, pushing for the first comprehensive drug abuse program in Texas. He was also instrumental in passing the state's first minimum-wage law. When he ran for lieutenant governor the first time, then-Lt.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
Evelyn B. Butterhoff, whose spirited barroom playing and renditions of Tin Pan Alley classics took her from the old Emerson Hotel to the Glenmore Tavern on Harford Road — and many places in between — died April 11 of dementia at the Hamilton Center, a Northeast Baltimore nursing facility. She was 86. Evelyn Beck was born in Baltimore and raised in the 400 block of Curley St. By age 7, she was studying piano with a neighborhood teacher, and by 1937 was studying with Jack Rohr at Hammann Music Co. at 206 N. Liberty St. in downtown Baltimore.
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NEWS
April 26, 1992
Name: Jennifer HolbrookHonored by The Carroll County Sun for: Becoming the finalist from the 6th District in the fourth annual RespecTeen "Speak for Yourself" letter-writing contest; she wrote a letter to Rep. Beverly B. Byron on equal representation in Congress for womenAge: 14Residence; hometown: ManchesterEducation: Currently an eighth-grader at North Carroll Middle School; graduate of Manchester Elementary SchoolFamily: Mother: Ardice, 42, homemaker; father:...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
You cannot imagine," Franz Liszt wrote, "how it spoils one to have been a child prodigy." Still, Liszt turned out just fine, enjoying enormous success as a pianist and composer, the kind of dual career that may well be in store for a prodigy born 16 years ago in China. His name is Peng Peng, and he makes his Baltimore debut Saturday in a recital that includes works of Brahms and Debussy, as well as his own music. No stranger to the concert stage - he made his recital debut at 8, his orchestral debut at 10 - Peng Peng can be heard on a just-out Naxos CD playing the heck out of Liszt's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 29, 1991
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, concluded what may have been its best Summerfest series ever Saturday with the best concert of the festival. The chief reason was an extraordinary Beethoven's "Emperor Concerto" that featured the pianist Nelson Freire.In the opinion of many piano aficionados -- including this writer -- Freire is the undisputed heir to the late Arthur Rubinstein. There is the same physical beauty of the playing -- gorgeous tone from top to bottom at all dynamic levels -- and a kind of technique that makes playing the piano seem as natural and as easy as breathing.
NEWS
September 11, 1991
Mabel Bonner Akehurst, 102, an officer in the United Daughters of the Confederacy, died Sunday at Good Samaritan Hospital of a heart ailment.Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Henry W. Jenkins and Sons funeral establishment, 4905 York Road.Mrs. Akehurst, who lived on Park Heights Avenue, was registrar of Baltimore Chapter No. 8 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy at her death.The former Mabel Yost was born in Baltimore and studied voice at the Peabody Conservatory. A soprano, she also sang in operas there.
NEWS
December 11, 2004
Rose H. Krieger, who had been a buyer and sales associate for several downtown clothing stores, died in her sleep Monday at Brighton Gardens assisted-living facility in Pikesville. She was 95. Born Rose Herman in Suffolk, Va., she moved to Baltimore with her family in 1924 and graduated from Western High School three years later. She also studied piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. Mrs. Krieger had been the buyer for Herman's, a North Eutaw Street women's and children's apparel store that had been established by her family in 1933.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
When Patrick Merrill started taking piano lessons at the age of 7, he was playing simple notes and melodies. But it wasn't long before his parents noticed how naturally Patrick was mastering difficult classical piano pieces. His mother, Brenda Merrill, recalled a lesson where he was learning to play a Mozart sonata. "I had seven years of lessons, and I never learned to play the piece," she said. "Patrick learned more in 10 minutes than I could learn in a month. That stuck in my head."
FEATURES
By PATRICK A. MCGUIRE | June 28, 1992
He's the man behind those beautiful sunrises seen each day on Channel 13's morning news show. He's also a veteran television news photographer who only recently has come out from behind his camera to be the host of WJZ-TV's twice-weekly "Now and Then" segments -- aired at 6:40 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays as part of the news show.Those sweet, nostalgic glimpses into Baltimore's recent past have made a minor local celebrity of Norm Vogel, a South Baltimore native who almost randomly chose photography over radar training when he joined the Air Force in the late '50s.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2002
SEAN LANE was talking with a friend about how busy his day had been, playing the piano at Nordstrom, watching his two sons, grocery shopping and cooking. The friend teased him, saying, "You'll make someone a good wife someday." Sean countered with, "I hope I'm being a good husband now." Like a growing number of young couples, Sean and Kathy Lane have chosen a fairly unconventional, but very practical approach to raising their family. Sean has stayed home with their two young boys while Kathy works full time as an administrator for Anne Arundel public schools.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
Robert E. Fields Sr., a noted Baltimore jazz pianist and composer who during his nearly six-decade career played in such venues as the Prime Rib, Belvedere Hotel and the old Chesapeake Restaurant, died Monday of bladder cancer at his Hamilton home. He was 80. Mr. Fields was born in Baltimore and raised in the Plymouth Road home where he had lived since 1940. "He was 8 when he started playing the piano," said his wife of 53 years, the former Joan Schumacher. "His father was leery of buying him a piano, so he practiced for a year on a next-door neighbor's piano until [his father]
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
When Patrick Merrill started taking piano lessons at the age of 7, he was playing simple notes and melodies. But it wasn't long before his parents noticed how naturally Patrick was mastering difficult classical piano pieces. His mother, Brenda Merrill, recalled a lesson where he was learning to play a Mozart sonata. "I had seven years of lessons, and I never learned to play the piece," she said. "Patrick learned more in 10 minutes than I could learn in a month. That stuck in my head."
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2006
A new dimension of music can be experienced through New York City-based architect/artist John Diebboll's 35 colored-pencil drawings that enable viewers to see music, on display now through Feb. 4 at St. John's Mitchell Gallery. The drawings were chosen from Diebboll's collection of art-case piano representations - a 19th-century tradition of one-of-a-kind commissioned constructions to be seen as well as heard. These drawings were inspired by such classical musical forms as etudes, bagatelles, nocturnes, fugues and operas, as well as by pianists George Gershwin, Thelonious Monk, Mary Lou Williams and Randy Weston.
NEWS
December 11, 2004
Rose H. Krieger, who had been a buyer and sales associate for several downtown clothing stores, died in her sleep Monday at Brighton Gardens assisted-living facility in Pikesville. She was 95. Born Rose Herman in Suffolk, Va., she moved to Baltimore with her family in 1924 and graduated from Western High School three years later. She also studied piano at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. Mrs. Krieger had been the buyer for Herman's, a North Eutaw Street women's and children's apparel store that had been established by her family in 1933.
NEWS
October 20, 2003
Preston E. Smith, 91, a former Texas governor known for his assortment of polka-dot ties and his old-fashioned electioneering, died Saturday in Lubbock. A Democrat elected to the first of two terms as governor in 1968, he relied on personal contacts, face-to-face campaigning and direct mail. Mr. Smith focused on education and criminal justice, pushing for the first comprehensive drug abuse program in Texas. He was also instrumental in passing the state's first minimum-wage law. When he ran for lieutenant governor the first time, then-Lt.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2002
SEAN LANE was talking with a friend about how busy his day had been, playing the piano at Nordstrom, watching his two sons, grocery shopping and cooking. The friend teased him, saying, "You'll make someone a good wife someday." Sean countered with, "I hope I'm being a good husband now." Like a growing number of young couples, Sean and Kathy Lane have chosen a fairly unconventional, but very practical approach to raising their family. Sean has stayed home with their two young boys while Kathy works full time as an administrator for Anne Arundel public schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 8, 1993
Athough he's not yet 33 years old, Barry Douglas has proved himself a survivor. When the Belfast-born pianist became the first Western pianist since Van Cliburn to win Moscow's Tchaikovsky Competition outright in 1986, he had to endure a storm of publicity that has undone many artists, including Cliburn himself.The young Irishman never made himself a party to hype -- his restrained, dignified manner makes him about as willing to undertake self-promotion as a cat is to take a bath -- and, although he made the requisite recording of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1, he managed to eschew most of the flashy pieces that tend to wear out the public's welcome of the latest sensation.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
Yesterday's concert at Second Presbyterian Church in Baltimore was a family affair.Robert Sirota, director of the Peabody Institute, his wife, Victoria, their son, Jonah, and daughter, Nadia, performed with an unusual combination of violas, piano and organ at a presentation in the church's concert series.The parents said they were especially pleased with how well the children played."If I hadn't been playing, I would have cried," Mrs. Sirota said.While it would seem natural for this musically gifted family to perform together, their mastery of seemingly incompatible instruments made yesterday's performance a challenge to the musical repertoire and family relations.
FEATURES
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
Daniel Hays is rhapsodizing about one of his life's passions:"It's not only an escape," he says. "It opens up new vistas. It's like, you open up a room, and then there's another door and then another, and it just opens up such " He pauses. What is the right word? A flash of inspiration pulls him to the piano keyboard an arm's length away."Like Chopin writing about the fall of Warsaw," he says above the heroic music rising from his Yamaha grand.In a couple of days he'll be playing at the Metro Food Market in Hunt Valley.
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