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By Ray Frager | November 12, 1995
"CONCUSSIONS ARE overrated."Thus spake one Rich Brooks, head coach of the St. Louis Rams, leader of men and apparent neurological expert.What's the big deal, Mr. Brooks was quoted as saying, with all this talk about concussions? It's not really any different from hurting other parts of your body playing football. Just a bunch of media hype, Dr. Brooks said.Now, I can't claim any of the expertise of the esteemed coach, but my limited knowledge of concussions tells me that the injury occurs when the brain bounces around inside the skull.
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SPORTS
By Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
While tossing a football around the back yard in eighth grade, Mason Zimmerman would crouch down and snap the ball to his best friend, Jacob Yunker, who lined up as the quarterback. The duo developed a connection and Zimmerman, a former tackle, went on to snap for Yunker that season and at Anthony Wayne High School in Whitehouse, Ohio. Three years later, Zimmerman has honed his craft and earned a scholarship to play for the Terps. Zimmerman had offers from Toledo, Marshall, Air Force and Cincinnati, but orally committed to Maryland on Sunday after visiting the school on June 8. The 6-foot-5, 275-pound center felt comfortable with the coaching staff and said the campus felt like home.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 23, 1996
A man fired a handgun into a group of children playing football in the 400 block of N. Lakewood Ave. about 8 p.m. yesterday, wounding a teen-age boy in the leg, police said.Ernest Graham, 15, of the 400 block of N. Lakewood Ave. in East Baltimore was in good condition at Johns Hopkins Hospital with a gunshot wound in the left leg, police said.They said the man had been in a long-term dispute with several youths over playing in the street.Police were looking for a 53-year-old suspect, driving a 1976 Chevrolet pickup truck with tags 273519.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Running back Lorenzo Taliaferro was the last player to walk off the Ravens' practice field Saturday, holding an upbeat conversation with coach John Harbaugh following the end of a rookie minicamp. It was a meaningful moment for the fourth-round draft pick from Coastal Carolina (Myrtle Beach, S.C.) considering that academic problems in high school nearly derailed a promising football career. Growing up in Williamsburg, Va., Taliaferro was ruled academically ineligible for his sophomore season at Bruton High School.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | November 8, 2008
Sam "Muggsy" Feldman grew up in an era when folks didn't brag about their achievements. It was between World Wars and during the Depression era. Adding to his restraint is the fact that he played for City College in three City-Poly football games in the 1930s, and the code for both teams was "Win without boasting and lose without excuse." With some prodding, however, Feldman, 89, breaks out old scrapbooks in his Pikesville home and opens up about his experiences in the rivalry series that originated in 1889 and continues with the 120th meeting between the schools at noon today at M&T Bank Stadium.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
It was the round ball that was in their plans, but now it could be the oval-shaped ball -- or both.Severn's Dennard Melton and Jeff Hatch were well on their way to college basketball a couple years ago before taking a detour to the gridiron. Neither had played a down of football before entering high school, and now the helmet sport has given each an option.At 6 feet tall and 190 pounds, Melton is a junior who runs the 40 in 4.5 seconds. Hatch is a 6-foot-8, 245-pound senior and 4.8 runner.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | November 18, 2007
If you ever doubt that America is the land of opportunity, look no farther than Ricky Williams, the running back who is on his fourth or fifth chance at a pro football career with his recent return to the Miami Dolphins. Williams looks different. He's clean-shaven, from dome to chin. And he sounds a bit different. He's not utterly the vague, navel-gazing guy we had come to know. Last week, he said he wanted to be a football player and that he realized it was what most fulfilled him. "Someone asked me a question.
SPORTS
October 25, 2005
"After three failed marriages, I know how it feels to be replaced." Terry Bradshaw On Fox's NFL pre-game show, about Jeff Garcia starting for Joey Harrington with the Detroit Lions "The time I glued my eye shut." Michael Vick Atlanta Falcons quarterback, responding to a question about his most memorable childhood moment, recalling when he mistook a bottle of glue for eye drops "Somebody has to say that `We're playing football right now. This is not a good time.'" Michael Irvin ESPN commentator, on the Minnesota Vikings' "Love Boat" scandal
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | January 28, 1994
ATLANTA -- Playing football is not hazardous to your health -- unless you're an offensive or defensive linemen. That was a conclusion of a study conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and released by the NFL Players Association yesterday.The study of 6,848 players who played between 1959 and 1988 revealed that 46 percent fewer players died compared to an equal number of males of similar age and race in the general population.That research suggests that former football players will live as long as the average male, although the majority is still too young to determine at what age the average player dies.
NEWS
By Bill Free | September 17, 2006
Westminster junior running back Jesse Astlin made quite a debut in varsity football, rushing for 94 yards on 18 carries and scoring both of his team's touchdowns in a 12-0 season-opening victory over rival South Carroll. Astlin, 5 feet 8, 140 pounds, got a chance to start in his first varsity game when senior Michael Hill couldn't play because of a knee injury. What do you like most about playing football? The adrenaline rush you get from the game. What is the hardest part of playing the game?
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Franklin's Jacquez and Jordan Adams didn't need much time on their visit to "Junior Day" at West Virginia before they committed to play football at the Morgantown school. At 12:36 p.m. Saturday, Jordan tweeted: "Verbally committed to WVU. " The twins, who helped lead the Indians to their first state football championship last fall, said they "kinda, sorta" knew they would commit to the Mountaineers because they had been West Virginia fans "for a while. " Franklin coach Anthony Burgos said he joked with the juniors, after he heard about the commitment, that they had been West Virginia fans since they were freshmen.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
The Navy is investigating the alleged sexual assault last year of a female midshipman at the Naval Academy by three members of the football team, a Pentagon spokesman confirmed Friday. The woman has told investigators she remembers little of the alleged assault, which she said occurred after she became intoxicated at an off-campus party in Annapolis, her attorney said. Susan Burke, the Washington-based attorney, said the woman learned from friends and social media that three football players were claiming after the party that they had had sex with her while she was incapacitated.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
Dave Cottle had a very successful nine-year run as the head coach of the Maryland men's lacrosse team. During Friday night's Major League Lacrosse Collegiate Draft, the connections between the Chesapeake Bayhawks coach and his former squad were on full display. With their first two picks in the draft, the Bayhawks selected Maryland players, taking long-stick midfielder Jesse Bernhardt in the first round (No. 4 overall) and midfielder Kevin Cooper (Archbishop Spalding) in the second round at No. 16 overall.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
Former Orioles outfielder Jai Miller had committed to play college football at Stanford coming out of high school, but instead he chose to follow a dream to play professional baseball. Now, at age 27, Miller is going to give college football another chance with one of the nation's top programs. Miller, who spent last season in the Orioles' minor league system with Triple-A Norfolk and Double-A Bowie, has reportedly enrolled at Alabama for the spring semester and intends to join the football team there, according to a report from BamaOnline.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | November 15, 2012
As university leaders weigh whether to cut baseball and men's soccer, Towson will be featured by the newsmagazine show "60 Minutes" as an example of a relatively unknown school trying to raise its profile with football. You can watch a preview of the segment here . Reporters for the show traveled with the Tigers to Baton Rouge to work on the story, which explains how Towson was paid $500,000 to play its game at LSU but reaped more in the way of exposure by playing one of Divsion I's best and most-popular teams.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
John J. Condon, a former insurance executive and sports fan, died Sunday of pneumonia at his Columbia home. He was 87. The son of an accountant and a homemaker, John Joseph Condon was born in Canandaigua, N.Y., and moved in 1929 to Forest Park with his family. He was raised on Garrison Boulevard and Euclid Avenue. He was a 1943 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington, where he was a quarterback on the football team and starting catcher on the baseball team. Mr. Condon was inducted into the school's Hall of Fame in 1987.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 1, 2006
After playing professional football for 10 years - six for the Baltimore Ravens - Michael McCrary retired in 2003. He, wife Mary and 2-year-old daughter Kohanna ("it means `little flower' in Japanese," he notes with pride) recently moved back to the area, buying a home in Baltimore County. Now getting into real estate development, McCrary, 35, starts each morning with a caramel latte at the Barista Espresso Cafe at Harborview. 2003 to 2005 ... not much of a "retirement"... Yeah. We lived in Scottsdale [Arizona]
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
Lakia White could not believe her eyes when the small black car sped her way. She knew the driver, Jody Marie Kittel, was angry at the pack of children playing football outside her townhouse on a quiet Glen Burnie street. But White, 13, remained disbelieving yesterday that the car had plowed into her and two other Glen Burnie girls Thursday afternoon, sending all three to the hospital. Kittel, 20, of the 6400 block of Lamplighter Ridge Road was charged with first-degree assault and remained under house arrest after posting $35,000 bail yesterday, Anne Arundel County police said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
John Oliver DeVries II, a retired real estate salesman and former lacrosse player, died July 7 of complications after surgery at Gilchrist Hospice. He was 83 and had lived in Roland Park. Born in Baltimore and raised on Keswick Road, he attended the old Mount Washington Country School for Boys and was a 1946 graduate of Loyola High School, where he played football and swam. He then enlisted in the Marine Corps and was stationed in Guam. He also played on a Marine football team. After military service, he attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he played football.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | June 9, 2012
There is always sadness when a former NFL player such as Dan Dierdorf limps around or there is news of another like Junior Seau committing suicide. Some of these guys were our heroes, but sympathy is about as far as it goes for me. On Thursday, lawyers representing more than 2,000 former NFL players filed a complaint against the league in U.S. District Court before Judge Anita B. Brody alleging the NFL "deliberately and fraudulently concealed from its players the link between football-related head impacts and long-term neurological injuries.
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