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NEWS
By Peter Morici | January 12, 2012
President Barack Obama is initiating an "Insourcing American Jobs" dialogue with top business leaders. The latter are always looking for tax breaks and special benefits, and this could quickly degenerate into pleas for special treatment - whereas creating the best overall environment for all private investment would best foster growth and jobs. Huge losses in Washington's equity stake in GM illustrate that government-financed jobs are too expensive. Fiascos like Solyndra and other ill-fated energy projects prove yet again that businesses, not bureaucrats, have the fine-grain information and financial acumen to make the right bets: investments that create new products, advance established industries and multiply jobs, not merely pay politicians' debts to campaign supporters.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Now that the NFL and the NFL Players Association have implemented human growth hormone testing as part of a revised performance-enhancing drug policy, Ravens veteran defensive end Chris Canty is hoping that ensures a level playing field. As the Ravens' player union representative, Canty voted in favor of the policy. The changes include a suspension of four games without pay for a first violation, a 10-game suspension without pay for a second violation and a minimum two-year ban for a third violation.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
When Maryland National Guard Capt. Cara Kupcho first enlisted in the military 18 years ago, she wanted to drive a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, a 30-ton, armor-busting tank. "I like things that go boom," she explained Thursday. "I like tanks. " But as a woman, Kupcho was barred from joining any of the armored units that used the vehicles. She became a mechanic instead, able to maintain tanks, but prohibited from driving them into battle. Outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced plans Thursday to end the long-standing prohibition on servicewomen in direct combat roles, opening hundreds of thousands of jobs formerly limited to men. "In our democracy, I believe it is the responsibility of every citizen to protect the nation," Panetta said.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 10, 2014
This is a column about campaign finance reform. And your eyes glazed over just then, didn't they? That's the problem with this problem. Americans know that government truly of, by and for the people is unlikely if not impossible so long as the system is polluted by billions of dollars in contributions from corporations and individual billionaires. Half of us, according to Gallup, would like to see public financing of campaigns; nearly 80 percent want to limit campaign fund-raising.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | October 15, 2000
In seven days, investor Richard L. Berman of Rockville will get his wish. So will Mario Barac of Columbia and Stuart Venzke of Greenbelt. That's when a new Securities and Exchange Commission rule kicks in, which is designed to level the playing field between big and small investors. Small investors have long complained that they have been iced-out of the information loop by publicly traded companies. The juiciest tidbits of information, they argue, are often spoon-fed to influential securities analysts, who pass it on to a select group of people - their clients.
NEWS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2008
Playing your first season at the varsity level is a tough enough proposition for many high school football players. For Bel Air sophomore Steve Hemmig, the learning curve is even steeper. Hemmig, 15, and his teammates will spend all this season and next season on the road while their school and home field are being rebuilt. The Bobcats (2-2 entering this weekend), in fact, recently played their own homecoming game at North Harford. Despite the lack of a home-field advantage, the 6-foot, 185-pound linebacker has flourished, leading his team in tackles.
NEWS
March 29, 1992
The Baltimore Baseball Club logo from 1892 appears on the ends of all aisle seats, and the batters in the logo will face the playing field.
SPORTS
April 6, 1992
The ground rules at Oriole Park at Camden Yards:* Foul poles with screens attached are outside of playing field.* Thrown or fairly batted ball that goes behind or under the canvas, also canvas holder, and remains: two bases. Ball rebounding in playing field: in play.* Ball striking surfaces, pillars or facings surrounding the dugout: in dugout.* Ball striking railing around photographers' booths: in play.* No break in backstop screen: ball in play.* Ball left of green stripe on rightfield wall and above lower fence: home run. Ball on or to right of green stripe: in play.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Chuck Foreman, meet Earl "The Pearl" Monroe. That's the how-de-do that Foreman, a former NFL star running back, wants to hear. "It would be a joy to run into Earl some day," he said. Foreman, who's from Frederick, played seven years with the Minnesota Vikings and led them to three Super Bowl appearances in the 1970s with mercurial moves that he borrowed from Monroe, a basketball Hall of Famer. "I grew up watching him play for the [Baltimore] Bullets," said Foreman, 63. "The Pearl could spin down the court, and the energy he brought to the game was unbelievable.
NEWS
April 4, 1994
A lot more opens today at Camden Yards and ballparks around the country than just another baseball season. The Orioles, now settled comfortably in their trend-setting new stadium, will field the strongest team in years. That the club will do so is largely due to its new local ownership. That alone launches a new era for the Birds. And baseball itself is embarking on an era of its own, with three divisions in each league and expanded playoffs. Some fans like the idea, others detest it. But it marks change in a sport that changes very slowly.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Nick Markakis, the longest-tentured Orioles player, will make his eighth straight Opening Day start in right field this afternoon. After testing his stiff neck during batting practice today, Markakis will be in the starting lineup batting leadoff. It will mark the most consecutive Opening Day starts by an Orioles outfielder since Paul Blair made 12 straight starts in center field from 1965 to 1976.  Two Orioles infielders -- second baseman Jonathan Schoop and third baseman Ryan Flaherty -- will be making their first Opening Day starts.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
Under Armour took on Nike and Adidas - and won. Beating out much bigger rivals to partner with the University of Notre Dame and its athletic teams catapulted the Baltimore-based sports brand onto an elite playing field, marketing experts say. The endorsement deal, announced Tuesday, signals how far fast-growing Under Armour plans to go and how it plans to get there. "It's a signal to their competitors, to the stock market, to the consumer, that they're in this for the long run," said Amna Kirmani, a professor of marketing at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Chuck Foreman, meet Earl "The Pearl" Monroe. That's the how-de-do that Foreman, a former NFL star running back, wants to hear. "It would be a joy to run into Earl some day," he said. Foreman, who's from Frederick, played seven years with the Minnesota Vikings and led them to three Super Bowl appearances in the 1970s with mercurial moves that he borrowed from Monroe, a basketball Hall of Famer. "I grew up watching him play for the [Baltimore] Bullets," said Foreman, 63. "The Pearl could spin down the court, and the energy he brought to the game was unbelievable.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 28, 2013
Saturday was busy for the members of the Germantown Elementary School PTA. Parents and teachers spent the morning and afternoon shoe-horning cars into every square inch of space around the Annapolis school, handling the overflow parking from nearby Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. Saturday was Homecoming, and the football game drew a sell-out crowd, including lots of fans of Navy's opponent, the University of Pittsburgh. At $20 a car - $45 for a bus or a camper - it was a big payday, too. The PTA parks an average of 575 cars for every home game, but for Homecoming, as well as the Air Force game earlier this season, the number jumps to more than 850. They used to park more than 1,200 cars on Navy football Saturdays, said former PTA treasurer Kevin Chase.
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Orioles prospect Henry Urrutia had three singles in the Surprise Saguaros' 7-6 victory over the Peoria Javelinas in the Arizona Fall League opener Tuesday. Urrutia, who batted .276 with two RBIs in 24 games for the Orioles this season, had an RBI single in the bottom of the first inning to extend the Saguaros' lead to 2-0. The 26-year-old outfielder, who batted fifth and started in right field for Surprise, also singled in the third and seventh innings and grounded out to second base in the fifth.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
TORONTO - Right-hander Jake Arrieta , who hasn't pitched in 16 days, was optioned to Triple-A Norfolk before Thursday's game to make space on the 25-man roster for starter Kevin Gausman . Orioles manager Buck Showalter said the team was deciding between "two or three" possible moves but decided it was most important to get Arrieta back on the mound. While disappointed, Arrieta agreed. "I need to get innings," Arrieta said Thursday. "I need to pitch in games, whether it's here or there.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
Imagine you are a benevolent monarch and you have the power to institute a sales tax. (Even benevolent government has to be financed, after all.) Would you set one up that gave preference to sellers located outside your kingdom and penalized your own subjects? Would you go further and discourage those outsiders from even setting up shop in your country? Of course you wouldn't. That would be crazy. And while there are plenty of examples of insane heads of state, they aren't usually beloved by their people.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Nolan Reimold hasn't played left field since last Friday, and if he can't get out there consistently this spring, he could end up on the disabled list when the Orioles break camp. That's so far away in Reimold's mind, however, that he's not even slightly worried. “What do we still got, four weeks [left]? I think I'll be all right,” said Reimold, who has been dealing with right shoulder tightness and has been limited to designated hitter duties. “I'm not really concerned about not being able to play the field.
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